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October 2021 Photo Quiz

By |October 14th, 2021|Photo Quiz|

It’s that time of year. The time when raptorphiles head to the mountains, the shores of large lakes, the coastal promontories, the riverine bluffs to watch for southbound raptors. However, with a bit of luck and a lot of scanning the sky, one can encounter raptors in active migration virtually anywhere on land.

Adult Birder Camp, West Virginia 2022

By |October 12th, 2021|Travel Feature, Travel or IFO|

When adult birders hear about the fun that today’s teenage birders have on our Young Birder Camps, we hear the same response over and over—“Boy, I wish they’d had birding camps when I was a kid!” While the ABA can’t bring back your youth, we are able to offer you an experience that will let you relive much of the best of sleepover camps, with a good deal more comfort and a LOT more birds! Main Camp When: June 2 - 6, 2022 Where: Opossum Creek, West Virginia How Much: $1,995.00 Single read more >>

Oaxaca, Mexico 2022

By |October 11th, 2021|Travel or IFO|

April 21–30, 2022
$4,560.00 – $5,310.00

Birding Oaxaca is a wonderful experience. Not only are there lots of birds in general, there are numerous regional specialties and endemics, many of which are real stunners like Slaty Vireo, Orange-breasted Bunting, and Red-breasted Chat. Add to that the striking scenery, the outstanding cuisine, the rich and varied culture, and you have a truly memorable destination!

August 2021 Photo Quiz

By |August 17th, 2021|Photo Quiz|

This month we’ve got an apparently small bird flying overhead. Perhaps-important ID clues include the mix of buff and white below, the small bill, and the long primary projection. The final of those characters suggests that our bird is an individual of a species that is either a long-distance migrant or a highly aerial one… or both.

Kenya 2022

By |June 18th, 2021|Travel Feature, Travel or IFO|

February 5-15, 2022
$5,750.00 – $6,400.00

Kenya offers some of the most thrilling birding and wildlife viewing experiences anywhere on Earth. The mammals and scenery are iconic and thrilling, and the birds are abundant and tend to be large, colorful, and perhaps best of all, easy to see and photograph!

Atlantic Region: Summer 2021

By |June 1st, 2021|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Summer 2021: 1 Jun–31 Jul David Seeler [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2021. Summer 2021: Atlantic R. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bBx> North American Birds. Weather conditions within the region normalized this season with the exception of the remnants of post Tropical Storm Eisa that briefly affected the region in early July. Species of note included the arrival of Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, and the exceptional discovery of a Steller’s Sea-Eagle along the Restigouche in New Brunswick by Gerry Issac. Pending approval, this unique discovery will provide the provinces of New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Quebec with first records. read more >>

Hudson-Delaware Region: Summer 2021

By |June 1st, 2021|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

Summer 2021: 1 Jun–31 July Robert O. Paxton [email protected] Amy Davis [email protected] Frank Rohrbacher [email protected] Shai Mitra [email protected] Recommended citation:  Paxton, R. O., A. Davis, S. Mitra, and F. Rohrbacher. 2021. Summer 2021: Hudson-Delaware Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bxM> North American Birds. Summer 2021 was rainy and hot, though without breaking temperature records. It was the third wettest July ever in Central Park, New York City (11.09”), and on 17 Jul a record 3.03” of rain fell at Rochester. A major feature of the season was a hatch of 17-year Brood X cicadas, particularly in Delaware. read more >>

Ontario: Summer 2021

By |June 1st, 2021|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Summer 2021: 1 Jun–31 JulAdam [email protected] [email protected] citation: Capparelli, A., Janvrin, J. 2021. Summer 2021: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bBo> North American Birds. We would like to extend our gratitude to Blake A. Mann, Roger Frost, Jeremy L. Hatt, Leo Heyens, and Brian Ratcliff for regional reporting, Andrew Keaveney for assistance in data logistics, and Joshua Vandermeulen, Michael Hatton, Melanie Palik, and Luke Raso for contributing the photo highlights for this report.Drought-like conditions from May continued throughout most of the province into the first half of the summer period. Southern and north-western Ontario saw higher than average temperatures while read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Summer 2021

By |June 1st, 2021|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Summer 2021: 1 Jun–31 Jul Rudolf Koes [email protected] James Fox [email protected] Recommended citation: Koes, R.F., and J. Fox. 2021. Summer 2021: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bu2> North American Birds. Summer 2021 in the southern prairie provinces was characterized by heat, drought and smoke. The drought conditions ranged from abnormally dry to extreme and exceptional - the highest possible rating - in much of Manitoba, with similar conditions in parts of Alberta and Saskatchewan. It was the driest July on record in southern Manitoba. The heat was unrelenting, and made all the more unbearable by persistent read more >>

Oregon: Summer 2021

By |June 1st, 2021|Oregon and Washington, Regional Reports|

Summer 2021: 1 Jun–31 Jul Adrian Hinkle [email protected]  Christopher Hinkle [email protected]  Recommended citation:  Hinkle, A. W., and C. Hinkle. 2021. Summer 2021: Oregon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bE1> North American Birds. Portland hit an all-time record of 116 °F in the end of June, while spots on the North Coast topped 100 °F. Much of the state’s lowlands reported temperatures in the 90s or higher for several weeks. Many spots in the Willamette Valley, including Portland, had no measurable rain after mid-June, and the whole state suffered from drought.  It was an average summer for birds, with read more >>

May 2021 Photo Quiz

By |May 20th, 2021|Photo Quiz|

While some of the poor aspect to this photo is the photographer’s inability to get the subject in sharp focus, much of it is due to the disheveled appearance of the bird. While we all like looking at crisp photos of birds in good nick (as Brits say), particularly of pleasingly attractive birds, not all birds can meet these criteria at all times.

Idaho and Western Montana: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Idaho & Western Montana, Regional Reports|

Spring 2021: 1 Mar–31 May Kate Stone [email protected] Recommended citation:  Stone, K. 2021. Spring 2021: Idaho and Western Montana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bsk> North American Birds. Birders throughout the region commented on low migrant numbers and late arrival dates for migratory breeders. March was relatively dry in most areas, with average precipitation in April and May. A storm event that brought heavy, wet snow and cold temperatures the third week in May resulted in heavy passerine fallout, with hundreds to thousands of sparrows grounded and foraging in snow-free areas. Birders in some areas also noted grounded read more >>

Western Great Lakes: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Regional Reports, Western Great Lakes|

Spring 2021: 1 Mar–31 May  William Marengo [email protected] Sub-regional Compilers Sunil Gopalan (Wisconsin), Andrew Simon (Michigan), Ethan Urban (Michigan)  Recommended citation: Marengo, W. 2021. Spring 2021: Western Great Lakes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-brT> North American Birds. Spring was a “Jekyll-and-Hyde” season. While waterfowl and shorebirds impressed, migrant passerines disappointed. The region had mild weather with steady northerly winds through the first half of May. This resulted in no fallout-inducing storms, to the disappointment of all. The most noteworthy species reported was a region first Arctic Loon from Lake Superior in northwestern Wisconsin. A Wilson’s Plover from read more >>

Hawaii: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Hawaii, Regional Reports|

Spring 2021: 1 Mar–31 May  Alex Wang [email protected] Jennifer Rothe [email protected] Recommended citation: Wang, A. and J. Rothe. 2021. Spring 2021: Hawaii. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bdI> North American Birds. Spring 2021 in Hawaii started off with a bang. Spring storms from the south racked the state, resulting in flash-flooding on multiple islands and culminating in a high point for bird vagrancy. The ABA Area’s first Inca Tern showed up at South Point, Hawaiʻi Island, immediately after the first storm system. Looking heavily worn and ragged, it was lucky to have made it this far north (the read more >>

New England: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|New England, Regional Reports|

The Spring 2021, Mar. 1–May 31 Greg Hanisek [email protected] Recommended citation: Hanisek, G. 2021. Spring 2021: New England. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-b6C> North American Birds.   The winter season's significant irruption of boreal finches continued into early spring. Major passerine fallouts were unimpressive, but gulls provided a series of highlights with species from across the continent and beyond. Sub-regional Compilers L. Bevier (Maine), S. Williams (Massachusetts), S. Mirick (New Hampshire), R. Farrell (Rhode Island), K. MacFarland (Vermont). Abbreviations L. Champlain (Vermont side of L. Champlain); Hammonasset (Hammonasset Beach S.P., Madison, New Haven Co, CT); Manomet (Manomet read more >>

Middle Atlantic: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Middle Atlantic, Regional Reports|

Spring 2021: 1 March–31 May Ellison Orcutt (Virginia) [email protected] Daniel Sloan (Maryland & DC) [email protected] Recommended citation: Orcutt, E. and D. Sloan. 2021. Spring 2021: Middle Atlantic. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bxB> North American Birds. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic continued to affect birding in the region. Organized field trips were far less frequent than they were before the pandemic, but with people spending more time at home and having more free time, birder participation in the backyard and in the field appeared to be as high as ever. The weather was rather ordinary and no major weather read more >>

Texas: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Regional Reports, Texas|

Spring 2021: 1 Mar–31 May Eric Carpenter [email protected] Recommended citation: Carpenter, E. 2021. Spring 2021: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bux> North American Birds. After Winter Storm Uri hit Texas hard in mid-Feb, I'm not sure birders knew what to expect come springtime. The impact of the prolonged sub-freezing temperatures of that storm was felt throughout the spring mostly via the absence of regular residents, such as Eastern Bluebirds and Eastern Phoebe, that presumably perished during the storm. Some of these species did start to rebound as spring progressed but many did not. As an example, around read more >>

Québec: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Spring 2021: 1 Mar–31 May Pierre Bannon [email protected] Olivier Barden [email protected] Normand David [email protected] Samuel Denault [email protected]  Recommended citation: Bannon, P., O. Barden, N. David  and S, Denault. 2021. Spring 2021: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-btB> North American Birds. Overall, spring 2021 was dry accompanied with temperatures above normal. March was very dry but ended with significant amounts of rain. April brought dry, warm weather to most of the province with the exception of eastern Québec where rain and snow amounts were above normal. May continued dry with only 12 mm of rain at Montréal. Temperatures read more >>

Ontario: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Spring 2021: 1 Mar–30 May Adam Capparelli [email protected] Josh Janvrin [email protected] Recommended citation:  Capparelli, A., Janvrin, J. 2021. Spring 2021: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-baJ> North American Birds. We would like to extend our gratitude to Blake A. Mann, Roger Frost, Jeremy L. Hatt, Leo Heyens, and Brian Ratcliff for regional reporting, Andrew Keaveney for assistance in data logistics, and Dennis Dirigal, Ken Ball, Jeff H. Skevington, and Anthony Glenesk for contributing the photo highlights for this report. The weather was generally dry and very warm throughout most of the province. The lack of rain, especially read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Spring 2021: 1 Mar–31 May Rudolf Koes [email protected] James Fox [email protected] Recommended citation: Koes, R.F., and J. Fox. 2021. Spring 2021: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-baf> North American Birds. A mild March brought in a large number of early migrants, only the most notable of which will be mentioned here. April turned considerably cooler and migration slowed to a trickle. While the period was much drier than average, a significant amount of snow fell across the south from 10–12 April, and a mixture of snow and rain trekked through the area 20–22 May. The amount read more >>

Oregon: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Oregon and Washington, Regional Reports|

Spring 2021: 1 Mar–31 May Adrian Hinkle [email protected] Christopher Hinkle [email protected] Recommended citation: Hinkle, A. W., and C. Hinkle. 2021. Spring 2021: Oregon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-b7U> North American Birds. It was the driest spring on record in Portland and across much of the state. Many areas suffered severe and worsening drought despite near-average snowpack in several of the major mountain ranges. Drought was especially pronounced in the Klamath Basin where water shortages are intensifying.  Unusually constant north winds along the coast for most of May contributed to record numbers of Red Knots. Most knots typically read more >>

Atlantic Region: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Spring 2021: 1 Mar–31 May David Seeler [email protected]  Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2021. Spring 2021: Atlantic Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-b7m> North American Birds. The most significant weather event for the region was the development of sustained easterlies that originated in Europe and reached the Atlantic Region in early April. Interestingly, these winds emanated in France and the southern United Kingdom, a significantly more southerly flow than the past. Species of note this season included Garganey, King Rail, European Golden-Plover, Wilson’s Plover, Ruff, Slaty-backed Gull, Barn Swallow (ssp. rustica), and Eurasian Tree Sparrow amongst others. Sub-regional read more >>

February 2021 Photo Quiz

By |February 17th, 2021|Photo Quiz|

Tony Leukering Fairborn, OH [email protected] Photos and answers are supplied by Tony Leukering, a field ornithologist based in southeast Colorado, with strong interests in bird migration, distribution, and identification. He has worked for five different bird observatories from coast to coast and considers himself particularly adept at taking quiz photos (that is, bad pictures!). Leukering is a member of the Colorado Bird Records Committee and had been a reviewer for eBird since its inception. He is also interested in most everything else that flies, particularly moths and odonates. read more >>

January 2021 Photo Quiz

By |January 15th, 2021|Photo Quiz|

Tony Leukering Fairborn, OH [email protected] Photos and answers are supplied by Tony Leukering, a field ornithologist based in southeast Colorado, with strong interests in bird migration, distribution, and identification. He has worked for five different bird observatories from coast to coast and considers himself particularly adept at taking quiz photos (that is, bad pictures!). Leukering is a member of the Colorado Bird Records Committee and had been a reviewer for eBird since its inception. He is also interested in most everything else that flies, particularly moths and odonates. read more >>

December 31, 2020 EDI Report

By |December 31st, 2020|Current, EDI|

December 31, 2020 As 2020 draws to a close, we have the following updates on efforts and progress towards equity, diversity, and inclusion within the ABA and the communities it serves. We have continued to listen to and amplify BIPOC voices and to increase representation in our various media and content streams. Our publications and our podcast have featured Black, Latinx, and other non-white voices regularly. Our November issue of Birding magazine featured extensive coverage of the #BirdNames4Birds issue, including an essay by teen birder Ashwin Sivakumar. Our December issue includes content aimed at reaching a broader audience, read more >>

Baja California Peninsula: Year 2020

By |December 31st, 2020|Baja California Peninsula, Regional Reports|

Year 2020: 1 Jan–31 Dec Mark J. Billings [email protected] Richard A. Erickson [email protected] Gerardo Marrón [email protected] Enrique D. Zamora-Hernández [email protected] Recommended citation: Billings, M. J., R. A. Erickson, G. Marrón, and E. D. Zamora-Hernández. 2021. Year 2020: Baja California Peninsula. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aM8> North American Birds. We are pleased to announce the first annual report for the Baja California Peninsula. We hope that this format illustrates changes in avian status and distribution in our region more effectively. We plan to report the total number of naturally occurring species that we find acceptable in the region read more >>

December 2020 Photo Quiz

By |December 16th, 2020|Photo Quiz|

Tony Leukering Fairborn, OH [email protected] Photos and answers are supplied by Tony Leukering, a field ornithologist based in southeast Colorado, with strong interests in bird migration, distribution, and identification. He has worked for five different bird observatories from coast to coast and considers himself particularly adept at taking quiz photos (that is, bad pictures!). Leukering is a member of the Colorado Bird Records Committee and had been a reviewer for eBird since its inception. He is also interested in most everything else that flies, particularly moths and odonates. read more >>

New Mexico: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|New Mexico, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Matthew J. Baumann [email protected] Raymond L. VanBuskirk [email protected] Jodhan Fine [email protected] Recommended citation:  Baumann, M. J., R.L. VanBuskirk, and J. Fine. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: New Mexico. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-br9> North American Birds. This season saw typical La Niña weather patterns for the region, characterized by above-normal temperatures and below-average precipitation, an unfortunate trend seen across the Southwest in recent years. The continued drought wreaked havoc on wintering passerines, especially sparrows, numbers of which were dramatically reduced statewide. The Arctic polar vortex extended into the Land of Enchantment in mid-February, bringing read more >>

Idaho and Western Montana: Winter 2020 – 2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Idaho & Western Montana, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Kate Stone [email protected] Recommended citation: Stone, K. 2021. Winter 2020 –2021: Idaho and Western Montana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aHh> North American Birds. In general, the region experienced a mild winter with relatively warm temperatures. Low elevations experienced little snow at the beginning of winter, though parts of MT experienced one of the snowiest Februarys on record, as well as a subzero cold snap at the beginning of the month. Challenging weather (such as in Idaho and Montana in October) along the migratory paths of many species may have contributed to some read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Rudolf Koes [email protected] Christian Artuso [email protected] James Fox, AB [email protected] Recommended citation: Koes, R., C. Artuso, and J. Fox. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-atv> North American Birds. The Prairie Provinces experienced wild swings in the weather during the winter of 2020–2021. Snowfall was extremely low throughout the south of the region, continuing the dry cycle of the past few years, and by the end of the period little snow cover remained. While December was generally seasonable, January was very mild (the second-mildest ever in southern MB). On read more >>

Southern California: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Southern California|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Guy McCaskie [email protected] Kimball L. Garrett [email protected] Recommended citation: McCaskie, G., and K. L. Garrett. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Southern California. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aPO> North American Birds. The winter period was generally very dry and relatively warm, with rainfall totals well below average and little persisting snowpack in the mountains. But we note that a great deal of winter field effort, and perhaps even a greater percentage than usual this winter due to COVID-related restrictions, takes place in well-irrigated urban parks, residential areas, agricultural areas, and artificial wetlands which are somewhat read more >>

Ontario: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Adam Capparelli [email protected] Josh Janvrin [email protected] Recommended citation: Capparelli, A., and J. Janvrin. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aDs> North American Birds. We would like to extend our gratitude to Blake A. Mann, Roger Frost, and Maureen Riggs for regional reporting, Michael V. A. Burrell and Andrew Keaveney for assistance in data logistics, and Riley Walsh, Laurel Wood, Alexander Skevington, and William Van Atte for contributing the photo highlights for this report. Most of Southern Ontario experienced the driest and mildest winter in recent memory, with significant snow cover read more >>

Oregon: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Oregon and Washington, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Adrian Hinkle [email protected] Christopher Hinkle [email protected]  Recommended citation: Hinkle, A., and C. Hinkle. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Oregon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-b6O> North American Birds. Winter was warm and dry statewide. Dec–Jan was one of the warmest on record in Portland, and above average in most of the state, while rainfall and snowpack languished below normal. February brought higher precipitation, above average in some areas, but most of the state ended winter with below-normal snowpack and rainfall, with especially severe water shortages in the Klamath Basin.  The Covid-19 pandemic continued to alter read more >>

Texas: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Texas|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Eric Carpenter [email protected] Recommended citation: Carpenter, E. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aGL> North American Birds. If you read our Fall 2020 summary, you might be thinking that those four months were one of the most amazing birding periods ever in Texas, and you wouldn't be wrong. Well, along came an unimpressed Winter 2020 saying almost out of the gate "Hold my beer", and then kept bringing it the rest of the season. For the most part, southbound "fall" migration in Texas can last up until almost the last read more >>

New England: Winter 2020-21

By |December 1st, 2020|New England, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–21: 1 Dec–28 Feb Greg Hanisek [email protected] Recommended citation: Hanisek, G. 2021. Winter 2020–21: New England. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aDf> North American Birds. Late and generally out of season records continued a long trend, but the most notable feature of the season was a wide-ranging irruption of boreal finches. Red Crossbills and Hoary Redpolls were noteworthy, the latter especially so because of their general rarity, identification challenges and taxonomic uncertainties. Contributors Louis Bevier, Nick Bonomo, Rachel Farrell, Peter Flood, Tina Green, Greg Hanisek, Neil Hayward, Rick Heil, Doug Hitchcox, Marshall J. Iliff, Skyler Kardell, Frank read more >>

Hawaii: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Hawaii, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Alex Wang [email protected] Jennifer Rothe [email protected] Recommended citation: Wang, A. and J. Rothe. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Hawaii. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-azQ> North American Birds. Winter 2020-2021 was a relatively mild one in Hawai’i, with few and short-lasting winter storms. A high ocean swell is characteristic of winter in Hawaiʻi, and this is why there are not typically any pelagic trips at this time of year. However, calm seas in the early part of 2021 allowed for three pelagics out of Kona in back-to-back weekends. These yielded sightings of both Black-footed Albatross read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Joseph A. Grzybowski [email protected] W. Ross Silcock [email protected] Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J. A., and W.R. Silcock. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bfb> North American Birds. This season was marked with the increasingly expected in recent times—many species across a broad taxonomic array wintering more northerly, at least until mid-February when an exceptionally harsh cold snap with ice and snow across the region made such a poor choice.   Eastern Bluebirds may have been especially hard hit by this storm in Oklahoma.  More patterns may become apparent in read more >>

Québec: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Pierre Bannon [email protected] Olivier Barden [email protected] Normand David [email protected] Samuel Denault [email protected] Bannon, P., 0. Barden, N. David and S. Denault. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-azu> North American Birds. Winter 2020–2021 was very mild, especially in the East. December and January were the mildest with temperatures 2–7° Celsius above normal, while the month of February was closer to normal. Precipitation of snow was below normal in most of the province. The mild temperature and the absence of ice on the main waterways probably explain why so many unanticipated read more >>

Western Great Lakes: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Western Great Lakes|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb William Marengo [email protected] Recommended citation: Marengo, W. 2021. Winter 2020-2021: Western Great Lakes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aPy> North American Birds.  December and January temperatures were well above normal for the region. Consequently, three states generated record-late reports of shorebirds and passerines, among others. February brought below-average temperatures to the region, and also to much of the rest of the country. There were no exceptional winter storms in an otherwise quiet “atmospheric” season.  Highlighting the winter were Wisconsin's two first state records: Allen’s Hummingbird and Sprague’s Pipit; three other accidental species and read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Robert L. Norton (Greater Antilles, Bahamas) [email protected] Andrew Dobson (Bermuda) [email protected] Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) [email protected] Recommended citation: Norton, R., A. Dobson, and A. Levesque. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: West Indies & Bermuda. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-apJ> North American Birds. Bermuda stole the show, with the first record Mountain Bluebird for the West Indies and Bermuda region. Clearly weather, as function of climate change, had an impact on long-distance vagrancy and perhaps short-distance dispersals as is the case with the Bahamas. Cayman Islands, Puerto Rico, Guadeloupe, Grenada, and Barbados all provided major read more >>

Atlantic Region: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb David Seeler [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Atlantic Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ayt> North American Birds. Regional temperatures were above normal this season, moderating many of the winter’s effects. Various forms of precipitation, consistent with normal amounts, affected the latter part of the season. Sea temperatures within the region were at record high levels for the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while the Bay of Fundy also had water temperatures above normal. As a result, sea ice coverage of the Gulf was at a record low. The development of read more >>

Colorado: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Colorado & Wyoming, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Dean Shoup [email protected]       Recommended citation: Shoup, D. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Colorado. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bEb> North American Birds. Colorado winter weather was mostly mild for 2020-2021 until February. From 12 Feb through the 16th, temperatures dropped significantly to zero Fahrenheit or lower. On the 14th, the high was 1 degree above zero and the low was 14 degrees below zero, both record values for the day. Denver also had some higher-than-average precipitation, getting 13.5 inches of snow. This was 7.8 inches higher than the normal 5.7 inches for read more >>

November 2020 Photo Quiz

By |November 20th, 2020|Photo Quiz|

Tony Leukering Fairborn, OH [email protected] Photos and answers are supplied by Tony Leukering, a field ornithologist based in southeast Colorado, with strong interests in bird migration, distribution, and identification. He has worked for five different bird observatories from coast to coast and considers himself particularly adept at taking quiz photos (that is, bad pictures!). Leukering is a member of the Colorado Bird Records Committee and had been a reviewer for eBird since its inception. He is also interested in most everything else that flies, particularly moths and odonates. read more >>

October 2020 Photo Quiz

By |October 16th, 2020|Photo Quiz|

Tony Leukering Fairborn, OH [email protected] Photos and answers are supplied by Tony Leukering, a field ornithologist based in southeast Colorado, with strong interests in bird migration, distribution, and identification. He has worked for five different bird observatories from coast to coast and considers himself particularly adept at taking quiz photos (that is, bad pictures!). Leukering is a member of the Colorado Bird Records Committee and had been a reviewer for eBird since its inception. He is also interested in most everything else that flies, particularly moths and odonates. read more >>

ABA Area Introduced Species

By |October 8th, 2020|Listing and Taxonomy|

One of the questions the RSEC receives most frequently is about which populations of introduced species may be counted in the ABA Area. Version 2020 of the ABA Recording Rules and Interpretations has updated Rule 2.B(v) to help clarify the answer to this question. Previously, the rule said that a bird is countable if from a population that met the ABA Checklist Committee’s Criteria for Determining Establishment of Exotics. However, the RSEC recognizes that criterion #8—which states that a publication must document the first seven criteria—would rarely be met for established populations that were not the basis for read more >>

September 2020 Photo Quiz

By |September 16th, 2020|Photo Quiz|

A distant bird on a treetop can be difficult to identify. Distance takes away most, if not all, of the features that we generally use to ID individual birds, leaving us with only gross patterns of dark and light, particularly on this quiz bird.

Free Digital Collection of “Missing” Southeast Arizona Bird Vocalizations

By |August 7th, 2020|ID Special Feature, identification|

SEAZ Birds: The Missing Tracks is a 117-track, 75-species, five-disc digital collection. It includes regular species with missing calls (such as Crissal Thrasher), regional specialties and subspecies (such as Elegant Trogon), rare birds (such as Rufous-capped Warbler), and long-expected state-firsts not yet on the Arizona Checklist (such as Rusty Sparrow).

SEAZ Birds: The Missing Tracks, Disc 2

By |August 7th, 2020|ID Special Feature|

Disk 1: Hawks to Flycatchers by Diana Doyle ⇐ Click the ZIP icon to download the entire disc 1 set, with liner notes (12MB .zip file). This album of the “missing tracks” for Southeast Arizona’s Sky Islands is intended to supplement the popular national-coverage app, Sibley eGuide to Birds. The album currently has five “discs” with 117 audio tracks of 75 species, including regular species with missing calls, annual specialties, local subspecies, rarities, and the rare but potential dream-birds: Regular Species— Locally common birds that are missing vocalizations often heard in Southeast Arizona, such read more >>

SEAZ Birds: The Missing Tracks, Disc 5

By |August 7th, 2020|ID Special Feature|

Disk 1: Warblers to Grosbeaks by Diana Doyle ⇐ Click the ZIP icon to download the entire disc 1 set, with liner notes (9.4MB .zip file). This album of the “missing tracks” for Southeast Arizona’s Sky Islands is intended to supplement the popular national-coverage app, Sibley eGuide to Birds. The album currently has five “discs” with 117 audio tracks of 75 species, including regular species with missing calls, annual specialties, local subspecies, rarities, and the rare but potential dream-birds: Regular Species— Locally common birds that are missing vocalizations often heard in Southeast Arizona, such read more >>

SEAZ Birds: The Missing Tracks, Disc 4

By |August 7th, 2020|ID Special Feature|

Disk 1: Euphonias to Orioles by Diana Doyle ⇐ Click the ZIP icon to download the entire disc 1 set, with liner notes (9.6MB .zip file). This album of the “missing tracks” for Southeast Arizona’s Sky Islands is intended to supplement the popular national-coverage app, Sibley eGuide to Birds. The album currently has five “discs” with 117 audio tracks of 75 species, including regular species with missing calls, annual specialties, local subspecies, rarities, and the rare but potential dream-birds: Regular Species— Locally common birds that are missing vocalizations often heard in Southeast Arizona, such read more >>

SEAZ Birds: The Missing Tracks, Disc 3

By |August 7th, 2020|ID Special Feature|

Disk 3: Vireos to Mockingbirds by Diana Doyle ⇐ Click the ZIP icon to download the entire disc 1 set, with liner notes (12.6MB .zip file). This album of the “missing tracks” for Southeast Arizona’s Sky Islands is intended to supplement the popular national-coverage app, Sibley eGuide to Birds. The album currently has five “discs” with 117 audio tracks of 75 species, including regular species with missing calls, annual specialties, local subspecies, rarities, and the rare but potential dream-birds: Regular Species— Locally common birds that are missing vocalizations often heard in Southeast Arizona, such read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Joseph A. Grzybowski [email protected] W. Ross Silcock [email protected] Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J. A., and W.R. Silcock. 2021. Fall 2020: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aj5> North American Birds. Assembling an overview for the season can reflect the repetition of long-term patterns expressing themselves that particular season. The mid-continental location of the region can also express some extremes affecting the region or parts of it that year—no year is average. The effects of significant events in adjacent regions can overflow into the Southern Great Plains. Sometimes, the patterns are deviations of read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Christian Artuso [email protected] James Fox [email protected] Rudolf [email protected] Recommended citation:  Artuso, C., J. Fox and R. Koes. 2021. Fall 2020: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ab9> North American Birds. Fall 2020 was dry across the south of the Prairie Provinces, with temperatures near normal except for a long cold spell in Manitoba in October. This cold weather resulted in smaller waterbodies freezing over and a rather early exodus of most water birds. By season’s end, snow cover remained minimal across the south of the region. Although some very rare shorebirds were recorded read more >>

Texas: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Texas|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Eric Carpenter [email protected] Recommended citation: Carpenter, E., et al. 2021. Fall 2020: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-a2M> North American Birds. From a birder's perspective, the Fall of 2020 in Texas was an absolute spectacle. With the on-going COVID-19 pandemic continuing into its seventh month and then some, even birders sticking close to home were finding a variety of species that rarely if ever before (or ever again) reach Texas in such numbers. The overriding story was a tired refrain of too many species, mostly songbirds, of the western U.S., migrating or read more >>

Oregon: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Oregon and Washington, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Adrian Hinkle [email protected] Christopher Hinkle [email protected] Recommended citation: Hinkle, A., and Hinkle, C. 2021. Fall 2020: Oregon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-a2A> North American Birds. A warm, dry August and September brought record wildfires that burned over a million acres, mostly on forested public land on the west slope of the Cascades. Wildfire smoke blanketed the entire state in mid-September, prompting health advisories and giving Portland the worst air quality of any world city 13 September. Smoke was so thick that starlings and pigeons were noted lining up to roost on powerlines read more >>

Ontario: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Adam Capparelli [email protected] Josh Janvrin [email protected] Recommended citation: Capparelli, A., and Janvrin, J. 2021. Fall 2020: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-a2s> North American Birds. Ontario experienced typical autumn weather in September and October, save a series of late September storms that produced an EF-1 tornado and dropped small hail in many locales in southern Ontario. The first half of November, however, brought a stretch of weather that was about as good as it gets for this time of year. Temperature records were smashed across the province, with some towns and cities read more >>

Québec: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 NovPierre [email protected] Olivier Barden [email protected] Normand David [email protected] Samuel Denault [email protected] Recommended citation: Bannon, P., O. Barden, N. David, & S. Denault. 2021. Fall 2020: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Io> North American Birds. The July heat lasted into August, but the end of the month was marked by a clear break in this trend. September exhibited normal temperatures and precipitation, while October was cool and wet. Finally, November was very mild and dry, especially during the first half of the month. Highlights of the season involved a high number of western vagrants and read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Robert L. Norton (Bahamas, Greater Antilles) [email protected] Andrew Dobson (Bermuda) [email protected] Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) [email protected] Recommended citation: Norton, R., A. Dobson, and A. Levesque. 2021. Fall 2020: West Indies & Bermuda. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aQ6> North American Birds. New regional and island records are reported from Guadeloupe, Bermuda, The Bahamas, and St. Vincent. Guadeloupe provided the first Caribbean record of Azure Gallinule and the country’s first record of Common Cuckoo (photographed by Anthony Levesque). Never recorded in the Caribbean, two European Golden Plovers (photographed by Erich Hetzel) were the first read more >>

Atlantic Region: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov David Seeler [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2021. Fall 2020: Atlantic Region & St. Pierre et Miquelon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9NX> North American Birds. The regional bubble maintained through the season for Covid-19 was successful, thus allowing more mobility than otherwise would have been possible. Good weather allowed for continued outdoor activities. An ongoing breeding bird survey in NL tended to increase the number of reports from that province this and last season. Temperature remained at or slightly above normal overall, with minimal changes to average precipitation. To the north of read more >>

Southern California: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Southern California|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Guy McCaskie [email protected] Kimball L. Garrett [email protected] Recommended citation: McCaskie, G. and Garrett, K. L. 2021. Fall 2020: Southern California. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bfC> North American Birds. The highlights of a typical warm and dry fall were the region’s first Fork-tailed Flycatcher on north Vandenberg Air Force Base in Santa Barbara Co, and its second Common Ringed-Plover at Morro Bay in San Luis Obispo Co.  Other notable vagrants included a Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher, California’s tenth Arctic/Kamchatka Leaf Warbler, a Northern Wheatear (San Clemente Island’s fourth muscicapid species!), five White Wagtails, a Field read more >>

Hudson-Delaware: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Amy Davis [email protected] Shai Mitra [email protected] Robert O. Paxton [email protected] Frank Rohrbacher [email protected] Recommended citation: Davis, A., et al. 2021. Fall 2020: Hudson-Delaware. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aDB> North American Birds. Overall, 2020 was the second warmest year on record for NJ and DE, and the third warmest for NY. In New York City, LaGuardia Airport and Central Park reported their warmest average Nov temperatures ever. Portions of NY state were abnormally dry this season with unusually low streamflow. On 4 Aug, Tropical Storm Isaïas generated significant rainfall, flooding, and wind damage, read more >>

New Mexico: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|New Mexico, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Matthew J. Baumann [email protected] Raymond L. VanBuskirk [email protected] Baumann, M.J., and R.L. VanBuskirk. 2020. Fall 2020: New Mexico. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9JT> North American Birds. This season was marked by unprecedented bird records, extreme temperature swings across the region resulting in mass die off of insectivorous migratory birds, and an ongoing global pandemic—making Fall 2020 one of the most exciting and challenging migratory seasons in recent memory (for birds and birders alike). September 28th will go down as the day that two first state records were discovered on opposite ends of read more >>

Hawaii: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Hawaii, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Alex Wang [email protected] Jennifer Rothe [email protected] Recommended citation: Wang, A. and J. Rothe. 2021. Fall 2020: Hawaii. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aes> North American Birds. La Niña conditions drove above-average amounts of rainfall, especially in November. August was hot and humid, at least along the windward sides of the islands. As usual, precipitation was driven by the predominant northeast trade winds. Notable storms were absent until mid October but arrived intermittently through November. The passage of these storms often coincided with arrivals of migrant shorebirds and waterfowl, which sometimes stayed only long read more >>

New England: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|New England, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Greg Hanisek [email protected] Recommended citation: Hanisek, G. 2021 Fall 2020: New England. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ae0> North American Birds. In this region with a long history of significant sightings, fall is an especially rich time for the discovery of vagrants. This year the usual array of state-level rarities took a back seat to two finds noteworthy in the context of the Lower 48—a Gray Heron and a Common Cuckoo. The first performed for a lucky two observers; the latter drew admirers from far and wide and disappointed few of them. As read more >>

Alabama & Mississippi: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov  Greg D. Jackson [email protected] Recommended citation: Jackson, G. D. 2021. Fall 2020: Alabama & Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aRz> North American Birds. A pandemic and a record-breaking hurricane season certainly made for a memorable and challenging fall season. Fortunately, with precautions, birding and other outdoor activities remained viable in our area. Migration was, in general, productive this fall, especially for shorebirds, flycatchers, and in some areas, warblers. The onset of a huge northern finch flight was felt earlier than usual. And the rarity parade was in full regalia, including a remarkable read more >>

SEAZ Birds: The Missing Tracks, Disc 1

By |July 17th, 2020|ID Special Feature|

Disk 1: Quail to Hummingbirds by Diana Doyle ⇐ Click the ZIP icon to download the entire disc 1 set, with liner notes (11.8MB .zip file). This album of the “missing tracks” for Southeast Arizona’s Sky Islands is intended to supplement the popular national-coverage app, Sibley eGuide to Birds. The album currently has five “discs” with 117 audio tracks of 75 species, including regular species with missing calls, annual specialties, local subspecies, rarities, and the rare but potential dream-birds: Regular Species— Locally common birds that are missing vocalizations often heard in Southeast Arizona, such as Buff-breasted Flycatcher’s read more >>

The ABA and Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

By |June 30th, 2020|Current, EDI|

The American Birding Association presents this summary of its recent and ongoing efforts to make our birding community more equitable, diverse, and inclusive. Please visit aba.org/EDI to learn more and contribute feedback on this and future reports. The American Birding Association affirms that birding can and should improve the quality of life for anyone and everyone. Our mission is to “inspire all people to enjoy and protect wild birds,” and yet the ABA, along with the larger birding community it serves, remains overwhelmingly white. We resolve to work with the Black Birder community, as well as read more >>

June 2020 Photo Quiz

By |June 16th, 2020|Photo Quiz|

A bird flying by… Better get the binocular on it before it’s out of sight! The bird might immediately strike one as a passerine or, at least, not any of the non-passerines – you know, all those birds at the front half of the taxonomy/field guide, many of which are waterbirds of various sorts.

ABA Statement on Black Birders Week and Anti-Racism Efforts

By |June 9th, 2020|Current, EDI|

Like so many in the birding community, American Birding Association staff and board were inspired by last week’s #BlackBirdersWeek, and greatly appreciate the effort to not only celebrate Black faces and voices in birding, but to draw attention to the unique difficulties birding can pose to Black people in terms of accessibility, safety, and community. 

A Birding Interview with J. Drew Lanham

By |June 4th, 2020|Current|

"Please don’t tell a person of color you don’t see color. That’s insulting. After all, most birders spend lots of time seeing color—otherwise a Red-winged Blackbird and a Snow Bunting wouldn’t be so beautifully different. So, see the color. Respect the face. Get to know me inside. The rest will fall into place."

Alabama & Mississippi: Summer 2020

By |June 3rd, 2020|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Summer 2020: 1 Jun–31 July John A. Trent [email protected] Recommended citation: Trent, J.A. 2021. Summer 2020: Alabama & Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-b87> North American Birds. The landfall of Tropical Storm Cristobal in southeastern Louisiana on 7 June was the most notable highlight this season, bringing good numbers of storm-related birds to coastal areas as well as scattered locations inland. Sites such as Columbus Lake in Mississippi saw many coastal tern species that were likely storm-displaced, filtering through the area well into July. Rainfall in both states was near average during the report period. Temperatures in read more >>

Québec: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|Quebec, Regional Reports|

1 Jun–31 Jul Pierre Bannon [email protected] Samuel Denault [email protected] Olivier Barden [email protected] Normand David [email protected] Recommended citation: Bannon, P., Denault, S., Barden, O., and David, N. 2020. Summer 2020: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9wZ> North American Birds. For the third consecutive year, the summer was hot and dry. June was one of the driest in years, while July was the warmest month in 100 years. The highlights for the period included a Mississippi Kite and a Burrowing Owl. The Yellow-billed Cuckoo, normally a rare breeder in the region, staged an impressive demographic explosion. read more >>

Ontario: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Summer, 1 June–31 July Adam M. Capparelliadam.capparelli[email protected] Josh [email protected] Recommended citation: Capparelli, A., and Janvrin, J. 2020. Summer 2020: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8TL> North American Birds. June and July 2020 featured severe weather events and extreme temperatures in Ontario. On the evening of 9 Jun, the Weather Prediction Center issued updates on Tropical Storm Cristobal in Wisconsin—an unusual track for a tropical storm. The following day featured one of the more significant tornado outbreaks in southern Ontario when seven confirmed tornadoes tore across the province; the strongest was an EF-2 in Mary Lake. Beginning on read more >>

Hudson-Delaware: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

Summer 2020, June 1–July 31 Robert O. Paxton [email protected] Shaibal Mitra [email protected] Tom Reed [email protected] Frank Rohrbacher [email protected] Recommended citation:  Paxton, R. O., et al. Summer 2020: Hudson-Delaware. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8TC> North American Birds. Summers grow relentlessly hotter. This season, the coronavirus precluded some field work, such as the New York City Audubon Society’s Harbor Herons Survey. In addition, an early deadline meant that breeding statistics for colonial waterbirds that have been traditionally a staple of this column were not ready at submission time. Next summer’s report will include them. On 10 July, Tropical Storm read more >>

Southern California: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Southern California|

Summer 2020: 1 Jun–31 July Guy McCaskie [email protected] Kimball L. Garrett [email protected] Recommended citation: McCaskie, G., and K. L. Garrett. 2021. Summer 2020: Southern California. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9RR> North American Birds. A typical warm and dry summer was somewhat lackluster for rarities, although the bizarre image of a Buller’s Shearwater swimming among wading American Avocets on a shallow pond adjacent to the Salton Sea is one that will surely linger.  A Little Stint returned for a second winter on south San Diego Bay, and a Brown Booby/Blue-footed Booby pair produced a chick on Santa Barbara read more >>

British Columbia: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|British Columbia, Regional Reports|

Summer 2020: 1 Jun–30 Jul Chris Charlesworth [email protected] Recommended citation: Charlesworth, C. 2021. Summer 2020: British Columbia. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9IO> North American Birds. Summer 2020 was cold and wet across British Columbia, as a longwave trough dominated the weather pattern resulting in precipitation surpluses of up to 33% across central sections of the region along with seasonal temperature deficits of up to 2º Celsius. And yes, cold winds blew frequently. The few warm, dry episodes only lasted a couple of days at a time. There was much evidence of delayed breeding by many bird species read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

Summer 2020: 1 Jun–31 May Joseph A. Grzybowski [email protected] W. Ross Silcock [email protected] Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J.A., and W.R. Silcock. 2021. Summer 2020: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Rk> North American Birds. The theme from the regional co-editors was that this was a normal summer, but perhaps with better data from more birders contributing to outlets like eBird and Facebook pages. Shorebird migration often muddles in June, so this season. And laggard or vagrant waterfowl species can be more visible. But several surprise summer vagrants occurred among passerines as well. The common theme for some read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Summer 2020: 1 Jun–31 Jul Rudolf Koes [email protected] James Fox [email protected] Recommended citation: Koes, R.F., and J. Fox. 2021. Summer 2020: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-b6X> North American Birds. Following the driest spring on record in Alberta, most of the province, except for the far northwest, experienced a very wet summer. In July it rained on 21 of 31 days in Edmonton, while a massive hailstorm in Calgary on 13 June created the fourth-most costly natural disaster ever in Canada. Manitoba also had a dry spring and precipitation remained at below-normal levels during the summer read more >>

Texas: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Texas|

Summer 2020: 1 June–31 July Eric Carpenter [email protected] Recommended citation: Carpenter, E. 2020. Summer 2020: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-914> North American Birds. Summer 2020 was the second season of birding during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the effects were similar to what we saw in the spring season. Many birders discovered ample opportunities close to home while both birding and travel opportunities farther afield remained limited. Still, this was not an entirely bad thing, as yard-listing has become a fun challenge for many who are scrutinizing their local birds more and more. Just what can you find read more >>

Atlantic Region: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

1 Jun – 31 Jul 2020 David Seeler [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2020. Summer 2020: Atlantic Region & St. Pierre et Miquelon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9qz> North American Birds. The season continued with the implications of the Covid pandemic strongly factoring in mobility throughout the region. The forming of an Atlantic Bubble (comprised of New Brunswick, Newfoundland & Labrador, Nova Scotia, & Prince Edward Island) enabled, for residents of those provinces, travel that otherwise would have been significantly impaired. June temperatures were near normal for the season but rainfall was significantly reduced. This was followed read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

Summer 2020: 1 Jun–31 Jul Robert L. Norton (Greater Antilles, Bahamas) [email protected] Andrew Dobson (Bermuda) [email protected] Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) [email protected] Recommended citation: Norton, R., A. Dobson, and A. Levesque. 2021. Summer 2020: West Indies & Bermuda. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-b8j> North American Birds. Dedicated sea watching from Bermuda produced a South Polar Skua and the island’s first Black-browed Albatross; a Roseate Tern found in Bermuda had flown from Ireland; and a Curlew Sandpiper made an appearance at Puerto Rico. Contributors Gloria Archilla, Sarahi Barbosa, Francoise Benjamin, Erick Bermúdez, Kenrith Carter (KC), Karim Carter (KCa), Martha read more >>

The ABA’s Statement on the Events at the Central Park Ramble, May 25, 2020.

By |May 27th, 2020|Current, EDI|

The American Birding Association is saddened by the situation documented by Christian Cooper in the Central Park ramble on May 25, 2020. We believe that all birders should be able to participate in their hobby free of harassment and bigotry, and we acknowledge that this is frequently not the case for birders of color. We urge all birders to learn from this - to defend fellow birders when they can and to call out bigotry when they see it. Inclusion and equity are core ABA values; fear and intimidation should never be part of birding culture. Access to read more >>

April 2020 Photo Quiz

By |April 20th, 2020|Photo Quiz|

I find that many birders don’t really learn most of the plumage features of really distinctive species, such as American Avocet, Belted Kingfisher, and Northern Cardinal. Each of these species has quite a few features that can enable identification...

ABA Area Big Year Rules

By |March 14th, 2020|Listing Menu|

An ABA Area Big Year shall start at 12:00 AM on 1 January of that year and end at 11:59 PM, 31 December of that year, based on the local time of the location of the birder at each time threshold. Each species counted by the participant must have been encountered in accordance with the ABA Recording Rules current at the time the species was encountered. Each species counted must have been on the ABA Checklist during the Big Year, with the following exception: A non-exotic species encountered that is new to the ABA Area can be retroactively counted for the Big read more >>

ABA Big Day Count Rules

By |March 14th, 2020|Listing Menu|

A Big Day Count is a single-team effort in which the primary objectives are (1) to identify as many bird species as possible during a single calendar day and (2) to strive to have all team members identify all species recorded. An official ABA Big Day Count must be conducted in accordance with the following rules: 1. Counting A. Count only full species as indicated by the current ABA Checklist and Supplements, or for non-ABA species outside the ABA Area, by James F. Clements Birds of the World: A Checklist or Morony, et aI., Reference List of the Birds of the World, or a recognized local read more >>

ABA Area Big Year Rules

By |March 14th, 2020|Listing Menu|

An ABA Area Big Year shall start at 12:00 AM on 1 January of that year and end at 11:59 PM, 31 December of that year, based on the local time of the location of the birder at each time threshold. Each species counted by the participant must have been encountered in accordance with the ABA Recording Rules current at the time the species was encountered. Each species counted must have been on the ABA Checklist during the Big Year, with the following exception: A non-exotic species encountered that is new to the ABA Area can be retroactively counted for the Big read more >>

ABA Area Reintroduced Indigenous Species

By |March 14th, 2020|Listing Menu|

This list, which is currently under construction and not yet comprehensive, comprises ABA Area indigenous species for which there are reintroduced populations. For each species, the reintroduced populations are listed, as well as countability information for each of the populations. Per Recording Rule 2.B(vi), an individual of one of these species may be counted only if the population it belonged to had successfully hatched young in the wild prior to the encounter. If you notice any errors in the information presented here or if you can add information, please email us at [email protected] (To be clear, the RSEC currently read more >>

ABA Recording Rules and Interpretations

By |March 14th, 2020|Listing Menu|

(version 2020) Members who submit a life list and/or other lists to the American Birding Association’s “Listing Central” must observe the ABA Recording Rules. Many non-members who enjoy maintaining lists may also find these rules useful. The member submitting a list is henceforth in these Rules termed the “recorder”. A recorder may include a species in totals submitted for ABA lists if the recorder has encountered a bird that is a member of the species in accordance with the following ABA Recording Rules. (1) The bird must have been within the prescribed area when encountered, and the encounter must read more >>

Recording Standards and Ethics Committee

By |March 14th, 2020|Listing and Taxonomy, Listing Menu|

NATHAN GOLDBERGChicago, [email protected] LAURA KEENEMico, [email protected] ASHER GORBETWestlake, [email protected] GREG MILLERSugar Creek, [email protected] JEFFREY GORDON*Delaware City, [email protected] GREG NEISE*Berwyn, [email protected] *-Non-voting staff liaison Past Voting Members Matt Fraker, 2015–2020 Nick Block, 2015–2020 Holly Merker, 2017–2019 Jennifer Rycenga, 2013–2018 Shawneen Finnegan, 2013–2016 Here you should be able to find answers to most of your questions regarding birding ethics and bird “countability”. Please find read more >>

ABA Checklist Committee

By |March 14th, 2020|Listing Menu|

PETER PYLE – ChairmanSan Francisco, [email protected] AARON LANGHomer, [email protected] MARY GUSTAFSONMission, [email protected] KRISTIE NELSONLee Vining, [email protected] TOM JOHNSONCape May, New [email protected] MARK W. LOCKWOODAlpine, [email protected] ANDREW W. KRATTERGainesville, [email protected] DAVID SIBLEYDeereld, [email protected] Past Members of the CLC (and years of service) Thirty-five field ornithologists have served on the ABA Checklist Committee, with terms ranging from one year to 16 years. Seven have served as chair, with terms read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

1 Mar–31 May Joseph A. Grzybowski [email protected] W. Ross Silcock [email protected] Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J. A. and Silcock, W.R. 2020. Spring 2020: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9xd> North American Birds. Each spring, migration data allow us to support or modify expected patterns of timing and distribution. Variations can create pictures of change—some gradual, some dramatic. In recent years, two trends that have emerged are an increasing array of early migrants and the spread of southeastern riparian and woodland species westward and northward. Although some areas were still experiencing drought, more water in substantive portions read more >>

Atlantic Region: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Spring 2020: 1 Mar–31 May David Seeler [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2020. Spring 2020: Atlantic Region & St. Pierre et Miquelon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Pk> North American Birds. Weather patterns for the region were near normal for much of the season. On 10 May a major spring storm hit the southern part of the region funneling up through the Bay of Fundy, moving into Gulf of St. Lawrence and subsequently impacting the northern parts of the region. The system brought winds gusting to 90–100 km/h, significant storm surges, snowfall, and in some locales rain, as well.. read more >>

Québec: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Quebec, Regional Reports|

1 March – 31 May Pierre Bannon [email protected] Samuel Denault [email protected] Olivier Barden [email protected] Normand David [email protected] Recommended citation: Bannon, P., S. Denault, O. Barden, N. David. 2020. Spring 2020: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9ap> North American Birds. Overall, spring 2020 was slightly cool in the south but milder in the north. March was 3ºC above normal south of the St. Lawrence River, with precipitation also above normal. April started mild but turned cool with precipitation below normal. May was dry and cool but ended up with four days of scorching heat late in the month. The read more >>

Alabama & Mississippi: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Spring 2020: 1 Mar–31 May Lawrence F. Gardella [email protected] Recommended citation: Gardella, L.F. 2021. Spring 2020: Alabama & Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Pz> North American Birds. The season began wet and warm in most of the region, but seasonally cooler and much drier in the extreme southern portion of the region. By the end of March, temperatures soared to record highs in the southern portion, and got somewhat cool in May. Rainfall at the immediate coast continued well below average, while rainfall farther north was above average. This April was different from the typical April. The read more >>

Illinois & Indiana: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Illinois & Indiana, Regional Reports|

Spring 2020: 1 Mar–31 May James D. Hengeveld [email protected] Keith A. McMullen [email protected] Geoffrey A. Williamson [email protected] Recommended citation: Hengeveld, J.D., K.A. McMullen, and G.A. Williamson. 2021. Spring 2020: Illinois & Indiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aId> North American Birds. The weather was unremarkable, with March the warmest and wettest relative to means. Nonetheless, the migration overall seemed ahead of schedule. The two states set 14 different early arrival records, and many species had notably early arrivals. The most extraordinary avian event of the season was the passage of 8000+ passerines on 15 May witnessed by Stephanie read more >>

Texas: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Texas|

Spring 2020: 1 March - 31 May Eric Carpenter [email protected] Bert Frenz [email protected] Anthony Hewetson [email protected] Jim Paton [email protected] Ross Rasmussen [email protected] Willie Sekula [email protected] Ron Weeks [email protected] David Wolf de[email protected] Recommended citation: Carpenter, E. 2020. Spring 2020: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8T9> North American Birds. COVID-19 had a noticeable impact on birding in Texas in Spring 2020. The main impact was where birder coverage was increased, and where it fell off the cliff due to various restrictions as well as many birders doing less traveling to see birds. Coastal migrant traps that typically host a read more >>

British Columbia: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|British Columbia, Regional Reports|

Spring 2020: 1 Mar–31 May Chris Charlesworth [email protected] Recommended citation: Charlesworth, C. 2021. Spring 2020: British Columbia. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-a3U> North American Birds. An upper ridge began building offshore by mid-March, gaining strength through April. The resulting cool, dry northerly flow led to depressed temperatures and precipitation, although stations east of the Rockies picked up some new snow the latter half of March. Interior valley snowpacks were late melting, mostly gone by the third week of April. The ridge broke down early in May allowing the westerlies to resume, especially over the southern half of read more >>

New England: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|New England, Regional Reports|

The Spring 2020, Mar. 1–May 31 Greg Hanisek 175 Circuit Avenue Waterbury, Connecticut 06708 [email protected] Recommended citation: Hanisek, G. 2020. The spring 2020: New England. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9nX> North American Birds. In spring 2020, the Covid-19 pandemic encroached, upending birder’s normal activities. Starting in March, field trips were canceled, sanctuaries and parks were closed, and even cemeteries—such as the popular Mount Auburn Cemetery in Massachusetts—restricted access. Plum Island was closed to vehicles until June 4. Birders, always resourceful, began solitary explorations, in some cases discovering good sites close to home that had been overlooked. News read more >>

Southern California: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, Southern California|

Spring 2020: 1 Mar–31 May Guy McCaskie [email protected] Kimball L. Garrett [email protected] Recommended citation: McCaskie, G., and K. Garrett. 2020. Spring 2020: Southern California. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-986> North American Birds. The crescendo of the COVID pandemic through the spring period certainly changed birder behavior, though it isn’t clear how this was reflected in the record of bird sightings. Some key areas were closed to the public—for example, San Clemente Island was essentially uncovered for the first time in a couple of decades, and one of the most important interior wetlands (Piute Ponds on the Edwards read more >>

Iowa & Missouri: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Iowa & Missouri, Regional Reports|

Spring 2020: 1 Mar–31 May Ryan N. Douglas [email protected] Joshua P. Uffman [email protected] Recommended citation: Douglas, R. and J.P. Uffman. Spring 2020: Iowa & Missouri. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-bc4> North American Birds. A warmer-than-normal winter bled into spring across Iowa and Missouri, with both states averaging March temperatures around 5°F above historical averages. Both states also experienced their wettest March in over a decade. The warmth of winter and early spring ended abruptly in April, with each state experiencing below-normal temperatures. The chilly April saw unusual midmonth snow fall across southern Iowa and northern Missouri. The read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

Spring 2020: 1 Mar–31 May Robert L. Norton (Greater Antilles, Bahamas) [email protected] Andrew Dobson (Bermuda) [email protected] Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) [email protected] Recommended citation: Norton, R., A. Dobson, & A. Levesque. 2021. Spring 2020: West Indies & Bermuda. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-baS> North American Birds Highlights for the region include a remarkable discovery of Trindade Petrel prospecting nesting at Bermuda: the region’s first Common Redshank in Guadeloupe; a first Little Egret for Anguilla; a pair of Swainson’s Hawks at Cuba, and a Bicknell’s Thrush in the Bahamas. Observers: David Ascanio, Erick Bermúdez, Sylvie de Blois, Lisa Brin, Bradly read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

The Spring 2017, Mar. 1–May 31 Greg Hanisek 175 Circuit Avenue Waterbury, Connecticut 06708 [email protected] Recommended citation: Hanisek, G. 2020. The spring 2017: New England. North American Birds 71(3). March weather in southern Manitoba was variable, while April was rather cold and windy. May had a brief cold spell during its second week, with record lows, followed by a warm spell. Similar conditions existed in the other Prairie Provinces. Numerous rarities were reported. Contributors Christian Artuso, Ken & Lou Ateah, Doug Beckingham, Jon Benson, Fred & Marie Bowen, Jan Bradley, Garry Budyk, Trevor Catchpole, read more >>

February 2020 Photo Quiz

By |February 18th, 2020|Photo Quiz|

Relative to the small branches, this quiz bird seems small and that feature, in combo with the fact that it’s perched in a tree, probably puts us in the large bird order, Passeriformes, which houses about half the world’s bird species.

Excellent Essays and Fantastic Photos Reveal Threats to Western Hemisphere Birds

By |January 21st, 2020|Book Reviews|

Beyond its well-crafted essays and lovely photographs, a beauty of Bringing Back the Birds: Exploring Migration and Preserving BirdScapes throughout the Americas is its compositional richness and diversity. One can either pick it up off the bookshelf for a good educational read or lift it from the coffee table for the avian eye candy.

January 2020 Photo Quiz

By |January 17th, 2020|Photo Quiz|

Photos and answers are supplied by Tony Leukering, a field ornithologist based in southeast Colorado, with strong interests in bird migration, distribution, and identification. He has worked for five different bird observatories from coast to coast and considers himself particularly adept at taking quiz photos (that is, bad pictures!). Leukering is a member of the Colorado Bird Records Committee and had been a reviewer for eBird since its inception. He is also interested in most everything else that flies, particularly moths and odonates.

ABA Code of Birding Ethics

By |January 2nd, 2020|RSEC|

Please take a moment to read the Code of Ethics and share it with others. As birders, we have a responsibility to bird respectfully. As the Code says itself, “Birding should be fun and help build a better future for birds, for birders, and for all people.”

Costa Rica Teen Camp with Hog Island Audubon

By |December 16th, 2019|Young Birder Camps|

Sponsored by Hog Island Audubon Camp and the American Birding Association! Join us for a week of ABA and Hog Island style Bird Camp in Costa Rica where we will explore the biology and conservation of neotropical species and have some fun meeting birders just like you. Dates to be determined, 2022 Camp fee: $2,235 includes round-trip airfare from Miami to Costa Rica, all lodging, meals, and park entrance fees.Camp Costa Rica is open to all birders ages 15-19 years old.Membership in the ABA is required to attend (can be added at checkout). Registration read more >>

Camp Zebra Hills

By |December 16th, 2019|Young Birder Camps|

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.” —Mark Twain, Innocents Abroad The American Birding Association is thrilled to announce Camp Zebra Hills, a life-changing, horizon-expanding birding and wildlife experience in South Africa! We’ll be hosted by our friends at Rockjumper Birding Tours, who call this region home and who provide crucial sponsorship support for all our Young Birder Camps. Schedule read more >>

Atlantic Region: Winter 2019-20

By |December 1st, 2019|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Winter 2019-20: 1 Dec 2019–29 Feb 2020 David Seeler [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2021. Winter 2019-20: Atlantic Region & St. Pierre et Miquelon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-aaM> North American Birds. The season began innocently enough, with milder temperatures and less-than-normal precipitation through December. On New Year’s Eve, a massive blizzard struck Newfoundland, and things changed for the region. Newfoundland was the recipient of numerous snowstorms through to the end of the season, including a record-breaking snowfall in mid-January. Southern parts of the region also saw significantly colder temperatures and stormy weather through the rest of read more >>

Southern California: Winter 2019-20

By |December 1st, 2019|Regional Reports, Southern California|

Winter 2019-20: 1 Dec–29 Feb Guy McCaskie [email protected] Kimball L. Garrett [email protected] Recommended citation: McCaskie, G., and Garrett, K. L. 2021. Winter 2019-20: Southern California. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9PZ> North American Birds. Following a significant cold storm on Thanksgiving, another cold and wet period began just after Christmas. Until then, rainfall totals for the season were well above average. However, January was dry and February was the driest on record for much of the region, so the winter’s overall precipitation ended up being a bit below normal.  A moderate mid-winter snowpack in the higher mountains fed read more >>

Québec: Winter 2019–2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Winter 2019–2020: 1 Dec–29 Feb Pierre Bannon [email protected] Olivier Barden [email protected] Normand David [email protected] Samuel Denault [email protected] Recommended Citation Bannon, P., Bardon, O., David, N., and Denault, S. 2020. Winter 2019–2020: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Ut> North American Birds. Winter 2019–2020 was very mild. January was the mildest month, being 4–6 degrees Celsius above normal, followed by February, which was 1–4 degrees Celsius above normal, and then by Dec, which was 1–2 Celsius above normal. Snowfall was below normal in Dec, near normal in Jan, and above normal in Feb. The mild temperatures probably helped some read more >>

Hudson-Delaware: Winter 2019–2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

1 Dec–29 Feb Frank Rohrbacher [email protected] Robert O. Paxton [email protected] Shaibal Mitra [email protected] Tom Reed [email protected] Recommended citation: Rohrbacher, F., et al. 2020. Winter 2019–2020: Hudson-Delaware. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Bm> North American Birds. The temperatures in our region from early December until late February were 6 or more degrees above normal, and snow was rare. Waterfowl were slow to move south, and it was even rarer for geese make it south to our region, with most of the Barnacle and Pink-footed Geese remaining in New England. Winter finches and Red-breasted Nuthatches remained in their breeding areas because read more >>

Oregon: Winter 2019–2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Oregon and Washington, Regional Reports|

Winter 2019–2020: 1 Dec–29 Feb Adrian W. Hinkle [email protected] Recommended citation: Hinkle, A.W. 2021. Winter 2019–2020: Oregon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Pn> North American Birds. The Pacific Northwest experienced a rather mild winter. December was a bit dry, but January was wet, with rainfall in Portland on all but a couple days. Particularly rainy and windy weather during the first half of January (including several fronts with strong winds out of the west) pushed unprecedented numbers of Black-legged Kittiwakes inland. Perhaps related to those storms, a beached Thick-billed Murre and a Murphy’s Petrel showed up in Clatsop read more >>

Iowa & Missouri: Winter 2019–2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Iowa & Missouri, Regional Reports|

Winter 2019-2020: 1 Dec 2019–29 Feb 2020 Francis L. Moore [email protected] Moore, F. 2021. Winter 2019–2020: Iowa & Missouri. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-akC> North American Birds. Average temperatures for December were unseasonably warm statewide in Iowa with the warmest conditions across eastern Iowa: up to eight degrees above normal. December’s statewide average maximum temperature was 38.1℉, 6.4℉ above normal, while the minimum temperature was 19.6℉, 5.5℉ above normal. Much of the southeastern two-thirds of Iowa experienced near to below average precipitation during December, with east central Iowa reporting up to one inch deficits. Measurable snowfall was also read more >>

Birding Online – December 2019

By |December 1st, 2019|Birding Magazine|

MICHAEL RETTER Birding Specials Editor F-stops, ISO, aperture, shutter speeds, lenses… Photography can be challenging. Our goal with the special Birder’s Guide issues of Birding is to seek out and distill expert advice, in order to make it as easy as possible for you to understand.With that in mind, our very first photography issue features an article by Keith Barnes on tips for taking excellent photos of birds.A suite of expert bird photographers shares with us their top tips and favorite camera rigs as they try to answer “Which Camera is Right for Me?”Kirby Adams explains how different kinds read more >>

Texas: Winter 2019 – 2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Regional Reports, Texas|

The Winter 2019 - 2020, 1 December - 29 February Eric Carpenter [email protected] Bert Frenz Anthony Hewetson Jim Paton Ross Rasmussen Willie Sekula Ron Weeks Recommended citation: Carpenter, E. 2020. The Winter 2019-2020: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8QF> North American Birds. Contributors: Greg Albrecht, John Allendorf, Debra Anderson (DAn), Mary Anderson (MAn), Marie Asscherick (MAs), Danielle Aube (DAu), Mike Austin (MAu), Kenneth Bader, Babe Banner, Bradley Banner (BrB), Barry Barentine (BaB), Sheryl Barker (SBa), James Barnes (JaB), Judy Behrens (JBe), David Bell (DBe), Robert Benson (RBe), John Berner (JoB), Brian Berry (BBe), Chris Bick, Amy Bishop, read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Winter 2019–2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Winter 2019–2020: 1 Dec 29 Feb Rudolf Koes [email protected] James Fox [email protected] Recommended citation: Koes, R.F., and J. Fox. 2021. Winter 2019–2020: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-btR> North American Birds. The winter of 2019–2020 was generally a quiet one, bird-wise, in the Prairie Provinces. After the very wet fall of 2019, precipitation during the winter was light and temperatures were generally within the normal range. The most noteworthy rarities were a Tundra Bean-Goose in Saskatchewan, a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and a Carolina Wren in Manitoba and a Green-tailed Towhee in Alberta. Geese read more >>

Baja California Peninsula: August 2016–December 2019

By |December 1st, 2019|Baja California Peninsula, Regional Reports|

Notable Bird Observations for Baja California and Baja California Sur, with an Updated Checklist for the States 1 Aug 2016–31 Dec 2019 Richard A. Erickson [email protected] Gerardo Marrón [email protected] Enrique D. Zamora-Hernández [email protected] Mark J. Billings [email protected] Recommended citation: Erickson, R. A., G. Marrón, E. D. Zamora-Hernández, and M. J. Billings. 2020. Notable bird observations for Baja California and Baja California Sur, August 2016 through December 2019, with an updated checklist for the states. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-91t> North American Birds. Report pages and links: Page 1. Abstract and Introduction Page 2. Observations (August 2016–December 2019) read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Winter 2019-2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

Winter 2019-20: 1 Dec 2019—29 Feb 2020 Joseph A. Grzybowski [email protected] W. Ross Silcock [email protected] Grzybowski, J.A. and Silcock, W. R. 2020. Winter 2019-20: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8So> North American Birds. Certain species continue to shift northwest, gradually, up riparian corridors. These include residents such as Pileated Woodpecker, Carolina Wren and Northern Cardinal. This winter, a broad array of less-hardy species was found much further north than is typical. Some of these, like Yellow-billed Cuckoo, White-eyed Vireo, and Orchard Oriole would have been unheard-of in previous years. Many of the less-hardy species even read more >>

Arkansas-Louisiana: Winter 2019–2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Winter 2019–2020: 1 Dec–29 Feb Paul Conover, Louisiana [email protected] Kenny Nichols, Arkansas [email protected] Recommended citation: Conover, P. and K. Nichols. 2021. Winter 2019–2020: Arkansas-Louisiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-b92> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include Brown Pelican, Great Crested Flycatcher, Tropical Kingbird, American Redstart, Golden-crowned Sparrow, and Rose-breasted Grosbeak. Observers (subregional editors in boldface) Leif Anderson, Todd Balinger, Katie Barnes, Bonnie Taylor Barry, James W. Beck,  Rrik Beck, Wendy Wilson Billiot, Gary Broussard, Jacque Brown, Robin Buff, Bill Burnham, Terry Butler, Lynn Christie, Pat Clanton, Paul E. Conover (Louisiana), Matt Courtman, Ivory Detter, George Dokes, Susan Edmunds, read more >>

Illinois & Indiana: Winter 2019–2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Illinois & Indiana, Regional Reports|

Winter 2019–2020: 1 Dec–28 Feb James D. Hengeveld [email protected]  Keith A. McMullen [email protected] Geoffrey A. Williamson [email protected] Recommended citation: Hengeveld, J.D., K.A. McMullen, and G.A. Williamson. 2021. Winter 2019–2020: Illinois & Indiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-b8s> North American Birds. It was a warm and wet season, with January the wettest and warmest month relative to average levels as temperatures soared into the low 60’s in the southern tier. As a result of the mild conditions, Lake Michigan was virtually ice-free throughout the season.  Mild conditions also undoubtedly contributed to the unusually large number of "non-winter" species read more >>

Colorado: Winter 2019-2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Colorado & Wyoming, Regional Reports|

1 December 2019 – 30 February 2020 Dean Shoup [email protected]      Recommended citation: Shoup, D. 2020. Winter 2019-2020: Colorado. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9t5> North American Birds. Colorado weather in December was warm and dry, with snow falling mostly in the high country. The exception to this was a late month snow storm that brought colder temperatures and 2.8 inches of snow to the Denver area on the 28th. January continued to be mild, with above average temperatures and below average precipitation. In contrast with December and January, February’s temperatures were colder with several storms producing read more >>

Florida: Winter 2019–2020

By |December 1st, 2019|Florida, Regional Reports|

Winter 2019–2020: 1 Dec–28 Feb Michael Brothers [email protected] David Simpson [email protected] Recommended citation: Brothers, M. and D. Simpson. 2021. Winter 2019–2020: Florida. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-a3g> North American Birds. The winter of 2019–2020 was predictably somewhat warmer than normal with average precipitation. Despite the rather ordinary weather, Florida experienced an exciting season with 16 species reported that were Florida Ornithological Society Records Committee Review Species. West Indian strays are always significant, with Florida usually the only state to host these rarities; what an exciting season it was with birds such as Scaly-naped Pigeon, Antillean Palm-Swift, La read more >>

The Comeback Bird

By |November 20th, 2019|Book Reviews|

When it comes to us and Ospreys, it’s deep and personal. Around 1970, a neighbor took an adolescent Carl to a secret fishing spot on an eastern Long Island pond. He saw a huge stick nest, and from what he’d been reading he knew some things: it was an Osprey nest, abandoned, and Ospreys were nearly extinct.