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Ontario: Summer 2023

By |June 1st, 2023|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Summer 2023: 1 Jun–31 July Adam Capparelli adam.capparelli@mail.utoronto.ca Aaron Rusak afrusak@gmail.com Recommended citation: Capparelli, A., and A. Rusak. 2023. Summer 2023: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-h7Z> North American Birds. We would like to extend our gratitude to Blake A. Mann, Brian Ratcliff, and Jeremy L. Hatt for regional reporting and Andrew Keaveney for assistance in data logistics. The lack of precipitation from May continued throughout the month of June creating drought conditions throughout the province. As a result, a number of forest fires broke out across northern Ontario, resulting in one of the worst summers for read more >>

Hawaii: Fall 2023

By |August 1st, 2023|Hawaii, Regional Reports|

Fall 2023: 1 Aug–30 Nov Alex Wang axwang12@gmail.com Jennifer Rothe jennifer.a.rothe@gmail.com Recommended citation: Wang, A. and J. Rothe. 2023. Fall 2023: Hawaii. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-h7J> North American Birds. While the Hawaii Region lacks some of the more obvious seasonal cues found elsewhere in the ABA area, the shift into fall is nonetheless perceptible and excitedly awaited by local birders. In addition to the return of the expected overwintering birds like Pacific Golden-Plover, Bristle-thighed Curlew, and other migrants, autumn ushers in a time where almost anything is possible. In contrast to 2022’s gull-depauperate fall, this autumn read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Winter 2023–2024

By |December 1st, 2023|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Winter 2023–2024: 1 Dec–29 Feb Rudolf Koes rkoes@mymts.net James Fox fox.james.ed@gmail.com Recommended citation: Koes, R.F., and J. Fox. 2024. Winter 2023–2024: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-h7v> North American Birds. The winter of 2023–2024 was one of extremes in the prairie provinces. Mostly abnormally mild temperatures were broken by two severe cold snaps. Alberta was particularly hard hit around the second week of January, when the temperatures ranged from -35° C to -40° C, bottoming out at -46.4° C at High Level on 15 January. To the east it was slightly less brutal. January finished unseasonably read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Fall 2023

By |August 1st, 2023|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Fall 2023: 1 Aug–30Nov Rudolf Koes rkoes@mymts.net James Fox fox.james.ed@gmail.com Recommended citation: Koes, R.F., and J. Fox. 2024. Fall 2023: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-h5J> North American Birds. Fall across the Prairie Provinces was characterized by mild and generally dry weather. Alberta had its warmest September ever, with temperatures into the mid- to high-30s early in the month. Several cities across the region tied or nearly tied their longest-ever stretches of frost-free days (around 155). In the east of the region there was one cold, snowy spell from late October to early November, but by read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Summer 2023

By |June 1st, 2023|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Summer 2023: 1 Jun–31 Jul Rudolf Koes rkoes@mymts.net James Fox fox.james.ed@gmail.com Recommended citation: Koes, R., and Fox, J. 2024. Prairie Provinces: Summer 2023. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-h5k> North American Birds. Drought conditions persisted through much of the western and central parts of the region; in Saskatchewan, ranchers have been forced to cull their herds due to a lack of fodder or resorted to cutting withering cereal crops to feed their cattle. The forest fires that had ravaged much of the forested areas during spring continued through the summer and by the end of the period the read more >>

Alabama & Mississippi: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Fall 2022: 1 Aug–30 Nov Greg D. Jackson g_d_jackson@bellsouth.net Recommended citation: Jackson, G. D. 2024. Fall 2022: Alabama & Mississippi.<https://wp.me/p8iY2g-h3S> North American Birds. The fall season of 2022 was kind to birders in our region, with moderate numbers and variety of regular migrants and a nice assembly of rarities to add a little fire to the mix (including a first regional record). Particularly noteworthy categories included the continued explosion of Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks and Limpkins, numerous shorebirds, plentiful and varied flycatchers, and an odd juxtaposition of western/southwestern vagrants with significant numbers of some easterly read more >>

Tennessee & Kentucky: Spring 2023

By |March 1st, 2023|Regional Reports, Tennessee & Kentucky|

Spring 2023: 1 Mar–31 May Graham Gerdeman grahamgerdeman@gmail.com Recommended citation: Gerdeman, G. 2023. Spring 2023: Tennessee & Kentucky. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-h3E> North American Birds. Temperatures throughout the region were about average overall, yet it was an average of highs and lows. The season began and ended several degrees warmer than normal, but was punctuated with snaps of unseasonably cold weather which drove down averages. There were 26 broken and 12 tied daily high temperature records for Tennessee in early April, yet most parts of the state ended the month under frost and freeze warnings. Precipitation-wise, read more >>

Arkansas Region: Fall 2023

By |August 1st, 2023|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Fall 2023: 1 Aug–30 Nov Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2023. Fall 2023: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-h3m> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include: American Avocet, Inca Dove, Piping Plover, Dunlin, Red-necked Phalarope, Little Gull, Swallow-tailed Kite, Say’s Phoebe. Geese through Limpkins Early in the season a high number of 400 Ross’s Geese were reported in the Atkins Bottoms, Pope Co 29 Oct (Kenny & LaDonna Nichols). A summering population of ten Snow Geese was reported at a Highway 226 pond east of Cash, Craighead Co 23 Sep (Colin read more >>

Western Great Lakes: Summer 2023

By |June 1st, 2023|Regional Reports, Western Great Lakes|

Summer 2023: 1 Jun–31 Jul William Marengo wcmarengo@gmail.com Recommended citation: Marengo, W. 2024. Summer 2023: Western Great Lakes <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-h1U> North American Birds. In a repeat from the previous year dry conditions, heat and drought prevailed throughout the season. Note that many of the casual and accidental species have yet to be reviewed by the state’s records committees. This report will be updated accordingly as the committees review the records. Sub-regional Compilers Andrew Simon (Michigan), Ethan Urban (Michigan) Abbreviations: Abbreviations: C.P. (County Park), L.P. (Lower Peninsula, MI), N.L. (National Lakeshore), N.W.R. (National Wildlife Refuge), read more >>

Atlantic: Fall 2023

By |August 1st, 2023|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Fall 2023: 1 Aug–30 Nov David Seeler dseeler@eastlink.ca Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2024. Fall 2023: Atlantic. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-h14> North American Birds. Overall, temperatures eventually moderated to near normal for most of the Region, while precipitation was near normal for the season. By mid-season, the Jet Stream pattern that was in effect approached the Region from the south eastern United States. This pattern moderated to a westerly flow across Canada later within the season. Hurricane Lee downgraded to a tropical storm as it entered the Bay of Fundy on 16 September. It quickly downgraded to read more >>

New England: Winter 2022-2023

By |December 1st, 2022|New England, Regional Reports|

Winter 2022-2023: 1 Dec–28 Feb Greg Hanisek ctgregh@gmail.com Recommended citation: Hanisek, G. 2022. Winter 2022-2023: New England. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gZH> North American Birds. It was another mild winter without any remarkable incursions from the north. Not surprisingly, birds that lingered beyond their expected limits were widespread, exemplified by six species of warblers that wintered along an esplanade bordering a sewage treatment plant in Norwalk, CT. Microclimates of this sort are increasingly establishing late records. Sub-regional Compilers L. Bevier (Maine), S. Williams (Massachusetts), S. Mirick (New Hampshire), R. Farrell (Rhode Island), K. MacFarland (Vermont). Abbreviations L. read more >>

Pre-Peterson Field Guides

By |April 27th, 2024|Current|

Imagine, if you will, that you’re a birder in the United States and Canada, and the time period you’re in is before the publication of the first edition of Roger Tory Peterson’s A Field Guide to the Birds on April 27, 1934. What book would you be using as a field guide?

April 2024 Photo Quiz

By |April 22nd, 2024|Photo Quiz|

Another raptory-hawky thing is this month’s quiz subject, and I know that everyone is excited about that! The wings are certainly obviously long, so ruling out vultures, eagles, long-winged buteos (such as Swainson’s and Ferruginous), and probably even harriers. Unfortunately, the quiz bird is streaked below ...

Ontario: Spring 2023

By |March 1st, 2023|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Spring 2023: 1 Mar–31 May Adam Capparelli adam.capparelli@mail.utoronto.ca Aaron Rusak afrusak@gmail.com Recommended citation: Capparelli, A., and A. Rusak. 2023. Spring 2023: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gU8> North American Birds. March felt more like winter than January and February with cold temperatures for most of the month, and several winter storms. In northern Ontario the cold temperatures continued into April resulting in an overall colder than normal month for that region. Even in southern Ontario, April continued March’s trend of cold weather (with some areas even seeing snow in mid-April) except for a brief period of extremely read more >>

Oregon and Washington: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|Oregon and Washington, Regional Reports|

Fall 2022: 1 Aug–30 Nov Eric Heisey heiseyew@gmail.com Adrian Hinkle adrian.hinkle@gmail.com Christopher Hinkle christopher.hinkle2@gmail.com Recommended citation: Heisey, E., A. Hinkle and C. Hinkle. 2022. Fall 2022: Oregon & Washington. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gTX> North American Birds. It was dry and cool for peak migration during September and early October. A series of storms in late October resulted in good seawatching conditions. By November it was again cool and dry. Cloudy and fairly calm conditions along the coast during peak migration resulted in a good showing of “eastern” warblers. Neah Bay was open this fall for the read more >>

March 2024 Photo Quiz

By |March 21st, 2024|Photo Quiz|

Ugh! I know. Shorebirds. Ugh. Right? Nah! Shorebirds are fun! Spring is an easier time of year to deal with shorebirds because most shorebirds are in alternate plumage (aka breeding plumage) and are more distinctive then. Of course, many or most one-year-olds never quite get to high plumage, but these birds seem to be in fine fettle, what, with one sporting spanky new scapulars; it is May in the photo.

Arkansas Region: Spring 2023

By |March 1st, 2023|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Spring 2023: 1 Mar–31 May Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2023. Spring 2023: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gOw> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include: Whimbrel, Glossy Ibis, Ferruginous Hawk, Crested Caracara, Western Kingbird X Scissor-tailed Flycatcher, Evening Grosbeak, Lesser Goldfinch, Lark Bunting, Scott’s Oriole. Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks continue to expand their range in northeast AR with the observation of six birds in the 1800 block of AR 304, Pocahontas, Randolph Co 22 Apr (Kent Freeman). A very rare Fulvous Whistling-Duck was in the company of 44 Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks in the read more >>

Arkansas Region: Winter 2022–2023

By |December 1st, 2022|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Winter 2022–2023: 1 Dec–28 Feb Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2023. Winter 2022–2023: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gOg> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include: Dark Ross’s Geese, Limpkin, Short-billed Gull, American Tree Sparrow, Spotted Towhee. Geese through Limpkins Six dark morph Ross's Geese were counted among a group of 23,000 Ross's Geese during the Pine Bluff CBC, Jefferson Co 28 Dec (Kenny & LaDonna Nichols). Perhaps this is the largest number of Ross's Geese observed at one location in the U.S. The report of two immature Trumpeter Swans at read more >>

Arkansas Region: Winter 2021–2022

By |December 1st, 2021|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Winter 2021–2022: 1 Dec–28 Feb Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2023. Winter 2021–2022: Arkansas Region.<https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gLg> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include: Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Anna’s Hummingbird, Snowy Owl, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Eurasian Tree Sparrow, Grasshopper Sparrow, American Tree Sparrow, Palm Warbler, Summer Tanager. Geese through Hummingbirds A very high count of 6,038 Ross's Geese were found on HWY 79 just north of the Arkansas River and north of Pine Bluff, Jefferson Co 28 Dec (Kenny & LaDonna Nichols). The report of 14 Trumpeter Swans at a pond on Clay read more >>

Hawaii: Summer 2023

By |June 1st, 2023|Hawaii, Regional Reports|

Alex Wang axwang12@gmail.com Jennifer Rothe jennifer.a.rothe@gmail.com Recommended citation: Wang, A. and J. Rothe. 2023. Summer 2023: Hawaii. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gKU> North American Birds. Summer in the Hawaii Region tends to be a relatively quiet time for local birders. Overwintering ducks and shorebirds have typically long since departed the islands for their breeding grounds. By the beginning of June, the stream of spring migrants has more or less dried up, and autumn migration tends not to begin in earnest until August. The remoteness of the Hawaiian Archipelago—thousands of miles removed from the nearest continental land mass—lessens read more >>

Illinois & Indiana: Winter 2021–2022

By |December 1st, 2021|Illinois & Indiana, Regional Reports|

Winter 2021–2022: 1 Dec–28 Feb James D. Hengeveld jhengeve@indiana.edu Keith A. McMullen warbler7@sbcglobal.net Geoffrey A. Williamson geoffrey.williamson.21@gmail.com Recommended citation: Hengeveld, J.D., K.A. McMullen, and G.A. Williamson. 2022. Winter 2021–2022: Illinois & Indiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gKF> North American Birds. The region’s second warmest December on record—5.6∞C warmer than average—was undoubtedly at least partially responsible for the amazing presence of 13 warbler species during the period and first winter records for several other species. January was slightly cooler and drier than normal, while February was very wet (80% greater precipitation above the average) with near normal temperatures. read more >>

Illinois & Indiana: Fall 2021

By |August 1st, 2021|Illinois & Indiana, Regional Reports|

Fall 2021: 1 Aug–30 Nov James D. Hengeveld jhengeve@indiana.edu Keith A. McMullen warbler7@sbcglobal.net Geoffrey A. Williamson geoffrey.williamson.21@gmail.com Recommended citation: Hengeveld, J.D., K.A. McMullen, and G.A. Williamson. 2022. Fall 2021: Illinois & Indiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gKs> North American Birds. It was the twelfth warmest fall period on record for the region, 1.2∞ C warmer than average, with October averaging 3.0∞ C warmer than average (the region’s fifth warmest on record). There was some indication that warmer temperatures through October might have slowed or delayed southbound movement. Precipitation was also higher than normal, driven by October’s rain read more >>

Southern California: Summer 2023

By |June 1st, 2023|Regional Reports, Southern California|

Summer 2023: 1 Jun–31 Jul Guy McCaskie guymcc@pacbell.net Kimball L. Garrett kgarrett@nhm.org Recommended citation: McCaskie, G., and K. L. Garrett. 2023. Summer 2023: Southern California. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gIi> North American Birds. After a relatively wet winter in most of the region, the spring and summer brought apparently high breeding success for many land birds, though quantification is lacking in most cases. The months of June and July in the region encompass the tail end of spring migration, a significant portion of the late spring “vagrant season,” the first few weeks of “fall” migration for many read more >>

February 2024 Photo Quiz

By |February 15th, 2024|Photo Quiz|

Those birding in wooded and forested areas encounter views like this far too often: A bird overhead straining one’s balance ability and with the bird extensively hidden by vegetation. This is a situation in which experience and knowledge help tremendously, as they can help slap a correct name on many a bird of which the typical, well-known field marks are hidden.

Western Great Lakes: Spring 2023

By |March 1st, 2023|Regional Reports, Western Great Lakes|

Spring 2023: 1 Mar–31 May William Marengo wcmarengo@gmail.com Recommended citation: Marengo, W. 2023. Spring 2023: Western Great Lakes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gFg> North American Birds. Spring produced two new regional records, one first state record plus the usual bevy of rarities. Otherwise the migration was typical. Note that many of the casual and accidental species have yet to be reviewed by the state’s records committees. This report will be updated accordingly as the committees review the records. Sub-regional Compilers Sunil Gopalan (Wisconsin), Andrew Simon (Michigan), Ethan Urban (Michigan) Abbreviations: C.P. (County Park), L.P. (Lower Peninsula, MI), read more >>

Oregon and Washington: Spring 2022

By |March 6th, 2022|Oregon and Washington, Regional Reports|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–31 May Eric Heisey heiseyew@gmail.com Adrian Hinkle adrian.hinkle@gmail.com Christopher Hinkle christopher.hinkle2@gmail.com Recommended citation: Heisey, E., Hinkle, A., Hinkle, C. 2022. Spring 2022: Oregon-Washington. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gEV> North American Birds. Many migrants arrived a bit earlier than normal, despite a rainy and at times cool spring. The biggest highlights were state-firsts of Common Crane and Cave Swallow in Oregon. Unusual numbers of coastal shorebirds found inland provided mid-spring excitement in the Willamette Valley. By the end of the season, an expected handful of vagrants showed up on the Eastside. Sub-Regional Compilers Tim Rodenkirk read more >>

Tennessee & Kentucky: Winter 2022–2023

By |December 6th, 2022|Regional Reports, Tennessee & Kentucky|

Winter 2022–2023: 1 Dec–28 Feb Graham Gerdeman grahamgerdeman@gmail.com Recommended citation: Gerdeman, G. 2023. Winter 2022–2023: Tennessee & Kentucky. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gEI> North American Birds. Weather conditions throughout the region fluctuated widely. Average monthly December temperatures were in the normal range for Kentucky and above average throughout most of Tennessee, despite the region being rocked by a winter storm that sent temperatures plummeting into negative digits. Some locations in middle Tennessee briefly saw temperatures below 0˚F for the first time in more than two decades. January and February temperatures were much above average for the season. read more >>

Illinois & Indiana: Spring 2022

By |March 1st, 2022|Illinois & Indiana, Regional Reports|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–31 May James D. Hengeveld jhengeve@indiana.edu Keith A. McMullen warbler7@sbcglobal.net Geoffrey A. Williamson geoffrey.williamson.21@gmail.com Recommended citation: Hengeveld, J.D., K.A. McMullen, and G.A. Williamson. 2023. Spring 2022: Illinois & Indiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gDQ> North American Birds. Across the region, a warm March was likely at least partially responsible for many early April arrivals. Like March, May was also warmer and slightly wetter than average, while April was cooler and slightly drier than average. Rarities were plentiful. First state records for Illinois included Brown Booby and Lesser Goldfinch. Unusual waterfowl included Fulvous Whistling-Ducks, Whooper read more >>

January 2024 Photo Quiz

By |January 23rd, 2024|Photo Quiz|

Various aspects of the month’s quiz bird’s plumage and some structure features rule out grebes, loons, cormorants, and all other “swimmy things” other than ducks. Once among ducks, distinguishing between dabbling ducks and diving ducks is mostly easy and straightforward.

Québec: Winter 2022–2023

By |December 19th, 2023|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Winter 2022–2023: 1 Dec–28 Feb Pierre Bannon pierre.bannon@icloud.com Olivier Barden iridosornis@gmail.com Normand David normanddavid@videotron.ca Samuel Denault samueldenault@hotmail.com Recommended citation: Bannon, P., O. Barden, N. David  and S. Denault. 2023. Winter 2022–2023: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gC3> North American Birds. Overall, the winter was very mild. Positive anomalies between 1.5 and 3.5 degrees Celcius were recorded between December and February. Sherbrooke observed the greatest deviation from normal during this period. Ice cover formed very late on the main streams, prompting several waterfowl to attempt to overwinter. Some species even wintered successfully for the first time and others read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Summer 2023

By |June 1st, 2023|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

Summer 2023: 1 Jun–31 Jul Andrew Dobson (Greater Antilles and Bermuda) andrewdobs@gmail.com Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) Anthony.levesque@wanadoo.fr Recommended citation: Dobson, A. & A. Levesque. 2023. Summer 2023: West Indies & Bermuda. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gBv> North American Birds. The brief summer period rarely produces surprises, but 2023 provided some spectacular sightings. The spotlight was on Barbados where two Little Swifts were new for both Barbados and the Americas. The island recorded its first Mississippi Kite—also new for the Lesser Antilles, and its first Cayenne Tern. A Pied Water-Tyrant was a great find in Grenada, another regional read more >>

Hudson-Delaware Region: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

Fall 2022: 1 Aug–30 Nov Amy Davis adavis@aba.org Shaibal S. Mitra shaibal.mitra@csi.cuny.edu Robert O. Paxton rop1@columbia.edu Frank Rohrbacher rohrbaf@aol.com Recommended citation: Davis, Amy, Shaibal S. Mitra, Robert O. Paxton, and Frank Rohrbacher. 2023. Fall 2022: Hudson-Delaware. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gB4> North American Birds. Fall 2022 was memorable for the number of state firsts discovered in the Hudson-Delaware region. Three new species were found in New York―Bermuda Petrel, Limpkin, and Sulphur-bellied Flycatcher―while New Jersey hosted an astounding seven firsts: Broad-billed Hummingbird, Bermuda Petrel, Eurasian (Western) Marsh-Harrier, Tropical Kingbird, Hammond’s Flycatcher, Brewer’s Sparrow, and Kirtland’s Warbler. Of these, read more >>

Hudson-Delaware Region: Summer 2023

By |June 1st, 2023|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

Summer 2023: 1 Jun–31 Jul Robert O. Paxton rop1@columbia.edu Amy Davis adavis@aba.org Shaibal S. Mitra shaibal.mitra@csi.cuny.edu Recommended citation: Paxton, R.O. A. Davis, S. Mitra. 2023. Summer 2023: Hudson-Delaware. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gAF> North American Birds. The Hudson-Delaware region avoided the extreme heat of some other parts of the U.S. in summer 2023, and rainfall was locally variable. Record rain fell in the Hudson Valley of NY on 9–10 Jul, reaching nearly six inches in 24 hours in some localities, but nesting was largely finished by then. Wildfires in the western U.S. and Canada created a smoke read more >>

The Final Stretch

By |January 9th, 2024|Current|

Sometime in the second half of 2024, I hope to see a bird. But this one will be different than other birds, although the bird will not know that. This particular bird will belong to a species that I will not have seen before, and it will represent my 10,000th species.

Southern California: Spring 2023

By |March 1st, 2023|Regional Reports, Southern California|

The Spring 2023, Mar. 1–May 31 Guy McCaskie guymcc@pacbell.net Kimball L. Garrett kgarrett@nhm.org Recommended citation: McCaskie, G., and K. L. Garrett. Spring 2023 Southern California <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gy6> North American Birds. Following the winter’s higher-than-average precipitation much of the region sported a lush mantle of vegetation – a mixed blessing of healthy scrub and woodland growth but also a profusion of invasive annuals destined to dry out and fuel wildfires later in the year. Near-record snowfalls in some of the mountains formed a snowpack that lasted through the spring at higher elevations, and rivers and read more >>

The Trans-Canada Jay Highway

By |January 4th, 2024|Current|

I saw the movie “The Big Year,” and by the time I left the theatre I knew I had finally found my true passion, the one thing that was missing from my life: birding. It was not just everyday birdwatching I craved, but chasing, listing, traveling to see the birds.

The Golden-winged Warbler Is the ABA’s 2024 Bird of the Year!

By |January 2nd, 2024|Bird of the Year|

by Frank Izaguirre Bee Bzz Bzz Bzz. That’s a sound birders love to hear, and, in some places, one birders hear less often than they used to. Gorgeous, threatened, prone to producing interesting hybrid combinations with Blue-winged Warblers: the Golden-winged Warbler is a birder favorite, whether encountered as an expected breeder, an uncommon migrant, or an electrifying vagrant. Golden-winged Warbler is also the first warbler selected as the ABA Bird of the Year. The ABA is honored to have Natasza Fontaine depict the 2024 Bird of the Year in her painting, “The Journey.” The art is read more >>

North American Birds: Vol. 74, No. 2

By |December 28th, 2023|North American Birds|

⬅ ABA Members! Log in here before using the links below. view/download magazine In this issue: From a Regional Report Editor Andrew Keaveney About the Authors 34th Report of the ABA Checklist Committee 2023 Plus a Comprehensive Overview of Their Status and Distribution Within North America Peter Pyle et al. Photo Documentation of Markham’s Storm-Petrel in Mexico Steve N. G. Howell Summary of Winter 2022–2023 North American Finch Irruption Matthew A. Young, Matthew J. Williams, Tyler Hoar, read more >>

Atlantic: Summer 2023

By |June 1st, 2023|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Summer 2023: 1 Jun–31 Jul David Seeler dseeler@eastlink.ca.ca Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2023. Summer 2023: Atlantic. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-guI> North American Birds. It was warmer than normal, with wildfires continuing to burn uncontained through to mid-June in Nova Scotia. Temperatures remained above normal, so much so, that for most of the southern parts of the Region July was the hottest on record. Precipitation was above normal by the latter part of the season, fueled by constant atmospheric rivers entering the Region. This cumulated in major portions of central Nova Scotia being flooded multiple times in read more >>

December 2023 Photo Quiz

By |December 18th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

Why do birds sit there all nice and steady… until one raises one’s camera? At least I expect this sort of behavior out of species in this family of passerines. Some quiz takers will work hard over this one, while others will snap out an answer immediately…

Hawaii: Spring 2023

By |March 1st, 2023|Hawaii, Regional Reports|

Spring 2023: 1 Mar–31 May Alex Wang axwang12@gmail.com Jennifer Rothe jennifer.a.rothe@gmail.com Recommended citation: Wang, A. and J. Rothe. 2023. Spring 2023: Hawaii. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gsQ> North American Birds. The arrival of spring in the Hawaiian Islands ushers in the end of the rainy season, but this year the arrival of fair, more stable weather was notably delayed. A parade of large, unusually active low pressure systems marched their way across the region all the way through into May. As a result, many areas of the Main Hawaiian Islands experienced flooding and high winds, and thunderstorms read more >>

Ontario: Winter 2022–2023

By |December 1st, 2022|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Winter 2022–2023: 1 Dec–28 Feb Adam Capparelli adam.capparelli@mail.utoronto.ca Aaron Rusak afrusak@gmail.com Recommended citation: Capparelli, A., and A. Rusak. 2023. Winter 2022–2023: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-gsG> North American Birds. We would like to extend our gratitude to Blake A. Mann for regional reporting and Andrew Keaveney for assistance in data logistics. Winter got off to a strong start in early December with colder than normal weather dominating most of the province up until the end of month. After that, things switched with mild weather settling in for the rest of the winter period aside from a read more >>

First Red-flanked Bluetail in the Eastern ABA Area

By |December 12th, 2023|Field Ornithology|

A Red-flanked Bluetail was a stunning find in Whiting, New Jersey in early December 2023. The bird’s discovery has attracted hundreds of birders from all over the East Coast and beyond. Patient observers were rewarded with quick views of the hyperactive little Old World flycatcher in bluebird drag as she flitted around low to the ground and bobbed her tail.

November 2023 Photo Quiz

By |November 16th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

Don’t blame me! I didn’t do it! Blame the bird for running out of the frame! Besides, while the bill might have helped, it might not have. Second besides, there are only four reasonable options for the bird’s identification, so you’re just going to have to do it without the bill.

Five Keys to Seeing 800 Birds in the ABA Area

By |November 15th, 2023|Current|

In 1968, at the age of 10, I set a goal to see 600 bird species in the U.S. by what then seemed the impossibly old age of 50. At that time, it seemed to me that spotting 600 bird species was akin to a Major League Baseball player hitting 500 career home runs, a goal which only a handful of players had reached. So, seeing 600 bird species was achievable, and certainly very special.

Clark’s Nutcracker, Pinyon Jay, and Pygmy Nuthatch Irruption 2023

By |November 14th, 2023|Field Ornithology|

Clark’s Nutcracker, Pinyon Jay, and Pygmy Nuthatch are on the move in fall 2023. All three species are occurring on the coast and in the desert at lower elevations than usual, as well as out of range. Clark’s Nutcrackers reached Minnesota and Wisconsin, Pinyon Jays pushed eastward, especially in Colorado, and a Pygmy Nuthatch turned up in Saskatchewan.

Bird Names for the 21st Century

By |November 2nd, 2023|Current|

What about the problem of the proliferation of honorific, or patronymic, names on the ABA Checklist? Should all those names–some of them referring to widespread and familiar species commemorating significant historical figures–be scrapped? This commentary addresses that question, and proposes a way forward.

October 2023 Photo Quiz

By |October 17th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

Given the excellent size comparison with the leaves and stems, this month’s quiz bird must be rather small. There seems to be an eye ring; obvious white wing bars; white leading edges to the tertials; long-ish primary projection; a short-ish tail; and olive back, nape, and crown. Some birders will immediately recognize the bird from two characters...

The Chicago Megaflight of 5 October 2023

By |October 16th, 2023|Field Ornithology|

Ever witnessed thousands upon thousands of warblers streaming overhead nonstop? In early October, birders in Chicago experienced a migration spectacle that they won’t soon forget. Nathan Goldberg, Marky Mutchler, and Jacob Drucker report on this megaflight, what caused it, and how birders made sense of the chaos, as well as the sad reality of the window-strikes that resulted and what you can do to help.

September 2023 Photo Quiz

By |September 18th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

Individual birds clinging to a tree in this bird’s manner are frequently woodpeckers but could be any of a number of species, some of which do not habitually perch in this fashion. The seemingly large patch of white on what might be the wings rules out Brown Creeper and various nuthatch species among the relatively few inveterate bark-clinging ABA-Area bird species. That white patch also rules out various species that I have seen irregularly or rarely engaging in bark-clinging behavior such as flycatchers, vireos, jays, warblers, and even sparrows.

Hurricane Idalia Report 2023

By |September 7th, 2023|Field Ornithology|

There is no gaudier or more glorious storm bird than American Flamingo, and perhaps no more absurd place for a pair of them to show up than Ohio. After Hurricane Idalia hurtled into the Florida panhandle, gawky hot pink waders began appearing as if in a nationwide yard flocking prank―in Florida, North Carolina, Texas, Ohio, and elsewhere.

Québec: Summer 2023

By |June 1st, 2023|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Summer 2023 was marked by the most severe wildfires that the province has ever seen, almost three times larger than any historic events. Temperatures were slightly higher than normal, especially in July, while precipitation was at a record-breaking high in many regions of southern Quebec.

August 2023 Photo Quiz

By |August 15th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

A bit of an odd little bird this month and one that would be, perhaps, more readily identified if the quiz were a video rather than a static photo. There is not much choice but to comb through the various species of ABA-Area shorebirds, and August is certainly a good month for those in most or all of the ABA Area. Distinctive features include…. Hmm, maybe I’ll leave determining those to the quiz takers. I will say, however, that one of those distinctive features is frequently overlooked when misidentifying this species for another.

Québec: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Again this year, the fall season was the most profuse regarding its number of exceptional birds. Rarities included Tundra Bean-Goose, Common Scoter, Magnificent Frigatebird, White-faced Ibis, Swallow-tailed Kite, Ash-throated Flycatcher, Gray Kingbird, Fieldfare, Green-tailed Towhee, and Townsend’s Warbler.

West Indies & Bermuda: Winter 2022–2023

By |December 1st, 2022|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

Winter 2022–2023: 1 Dec–28 Feb Andrew Dobson (Greater Antilles, Bahamas, Bermuda) andrewdobs@gmail.com Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) Anthony.levesque@wanadoo.fr Recommended citation: Dobson, A., & A. Levesque. 2023. Winter 2022–2023: West Indies & Bermuda. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fDQ> North American Birds. Significant first records occurred in Antigua (Northern Lapwing), Cuba (White Wagtail), Dominican Republic (Ruff), Guadeloupe (Western Reef-Heron), Saint Kitts (Spotted Redshank), and Jamaica (Southern Lapwing), while Bermuda recorded its second record of Hairy Woodpecker. Ducks to Shorebirds One long-staying Fulvous Whistling-Duck was joined by two more at Fosters Private Wetland, Saint Lucy, Barbados 7 read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Winter 2022–2023

By |December 1st, 2022|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Winter 2022–2023: 1 Dec-28 Feb Rudolf Koes rkoes@mymts.net James Fox fox.james.ed@gmail.com Recommended citation: Koes, R.F, and J. Fox. 2023. Winter 2022-2023: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fDi> North American Birds. The winter of 2022–2023 was very quiet in the Prairie Provinces, bird-wise. Many of the species that are usually counted on to add spice to the season were scarce or absent. Northern owls were hard to come by, with mediocre numbers of Snowy Owls and an almost complete absence of Northern Hawk-Owls and Great Gray Owls. Similarly, winter finches were present in low numbers, with a read more >>

Baja California Peninsula: Year 2022

By |January 1st, 2023|Baja California Peninsula, Regional Reports|

Year 2022: 1 Jan–31 Dec Richard A. Erickson richard.erickson@lsa.net Gerardo Marrón atakamara@gmail.com Enrique D. Zamora-Hernández zugunruhe@gmail.com Recommended citation: Erickson, R. A., G. Marrón, and E. D. Zamora-Hernández. 2023. Year 2022: Baja California Peninsula. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fCa> North American Birds. Observer coverage of the region continued to improve in 2022 based on eBird data, and the number of species recorded increased in kind. At 417, the total number for the region was more than in the previous two years (405, 402). The same was true for Baja California Sur (343 compared to 316 and 336), but read more >>

American Birding Association Checklist Committee (CLC) Midterm Report, 2023

By |July 19th, 2023|Listing and Taxonomy|

We present our 2023 "midterm" announcements based on species additions and ABA code changes since our annual report in December 2022. Additions and code changes will be incorporated into the next ABA Checklist, along with taxonomic and nomenclatural revisions from the 64th Supplement to the American Ornithological Society (AOS) Check-list.

2023’s El Niño Begins

By |July 19th, 2023|Field Ornithology|

Marine ecology is complicated, yet there is one pattern that is quite consistent: cold water has more food than warm water. So when waters warm in an El Niño, such as is occurring now, birds move to find food. Read on for details about what exciting birds are showing up, and where.

July 2023 Photo Quiz

By |July 14th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

There are not a lot of ABA-Area bird families that could claim a bird that looks like this, what with those long legs, strongly patterned tawny wings, and strongly black-barred tawny tail. In fact, most observers probably immediately narrowed the bird down to just a couple of species, neither of which is at all rare in the ABA Area...

North American Birds: Vol. 74, No. 1

By |July 11th, 2023|North American Birds|

⬅ ABA Members! Log in here before using the links below. view/download magazine In this issue: From the Editor Michael L. P. Retter About the Authors Red-legged Honeycreepers in the Unites States Plus a Comprehensive Overview of Their Status and Distribution Within North America Amy Davis Michael L. P. Retter First State and Provincial Records from 2022 Compiled by Nate Swick “European” Sandwich Tern in North America Notes on Occurrence and Identification David Sibley What’s So Kingly read more >>

Western Great Lakes: Winter 2022–2023

By |December 1st, 2022|Regional Reports, Western Great Lakes|

Winter 2022–2023: 1 Dec–28 Feb Ethan Urban ethanurban9@gmail.com Recommended citation: Urban, E. 2023. Winter 2022–2023: Western Great Lakes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fwq> North American Birds. This mostly unremarkable winter season was warmer than average, and included a few notable rarities such as Ivory Gull, multiple Slaty-backed Gulls, Yellow-billed Loon, and Prairie Falcon. It was a poor winter for Snowy Owl and, with the exception of Evening Grosbeaks, winter finches. Note that many of the casual and accidental species have yet to be reviewed by their respective records committees. This report will be updated accordingly as the read more >>

June 2023 Photo Quiz

By |June 16th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

Don’t you just love looking up at the nether regions of birds? I can imagine some quiz takers crying foul, but the bird is identifiable. In fact, it’s easily identifiable. One simply must be aware of the usefulness of certain characters, and that awareness takes study, both of field guides and of actual birds.

Arkansas Region: Spring 2021

By |March 1st, 2021|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Spring 2021: 1 Mar–31 May Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2023. Spring 2021: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fpj> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include: Black-necked Stilt, Dunlin, Dark-eyed Junco x White-throated Sparrow Hybrid, Evening Grosbeak, Lesser Goldfinch, Lazuli Bunting, Bobolink, Yellow-headed Blackbird. Swans through Doves Trumpeter Swans are rare outside of the Magness Lake, Cleburne Co area where they have been regular in significant numbers in winter. This season there are only two reports of Trumpeter Swans outside the afore mentioned area: three at a small pond near James read more >>

Hawaii: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|Hawaii, Regional Reports|

Fall 2022: 1 Aug–30 Nov Alex Wang axwang12@gmail.com Jennifer Rothe jennifer.a.rothe@gmail.com Recommended citation: Wang, A., and J. Rothe. 2023. Summer 2022: Hawaii. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fnS> North American Birds. Autumn begins an exciting season for birders in the Hawaii Region. Long-distance migrants like Bristle-thighed Curlew and Pacific Golden-Plover begin returning from their nesting grounds on the North American continent, and handfuls of waterfowl settle in to overwinter in the islands. Invariably, these expected arrivals are accompanied by a mixed bag of wayward migrants, most often in the form of raptors, gulls, and especially shorebirds. The first-ever read more >>

Arkansas Region: Summer 2021

By |June 1st, 2021|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Summer 2021: 1 Jun–31 Jul Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2023. Summer 2021: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fnI> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights: Greater White-fronted Goose, Greater White-fronted Goose x Canada Goose hybrid, Inca Dove, White-winged Dove, and Sandhill Crane. Whistling-Ducks through Quails Nesting of Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks was established in Crawford Co with the appearance adults with at least 12 recently hatched chicks near Alma, King Ranch along Orrick Road, Crawford Co 18 Jun (Joe Neal). In addition, two Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks were observed along the Coal Hill BBS route read more >>

Arkansas Region: Summer 2020

By |June 1st, 2020|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Summer 2020: 1 Jun–31 Jul Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2022. Summer 2020: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fnw> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights: Red-breasted Merganser, Rufous Hummingbird, Laughing Gull, Royal Tern, nesting White-faced Ibis, and nesting Swallow-tailed Kites. Ducks through Terns Red-breasted Merganser photographed at Lake Balboa, Hot Springs Village, Garland Co 20 Jun (Vic Prislipsky) was just the second ever summer record. An Inca Dove at Stephens 26 Jun was just the second for Ouachita Co (Michael Linz, Patty McLean). A White-winged Dove was west of Garland City, read more >>

Arkansas Region: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Fall 2022: 1 Aug–30 Nov Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2023. Fall 2022: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fnc> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include Tundra Swan, Eurasian Wigeon, Red-necked Grebe, Limpkin, Brown Booby, Swallow-tailed Kite, and a Say’s Phoebe. Continuing observation of Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks at the Arkadelphia Oxidation Ponds, Clark Co 13 Aug verifies suspected reproduction with four young seen. Up to 10 adults have been at this site since 23 May (Renn and Terry Tumlison). Two Tundra Swans were seen foraging in a field with 10 Trumpeter Swans read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|West Indies & Bermuda|

Fall 2022: 1 Aug–30 Nov Andrew Dobson (Bermuda) andrewdobs@gmail.com Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) Anthony.levesque@wanadoo.fr Recommended citation: Dobson, A. & A. Levesque. 2023. Fall 2022: West Indies & Bermuda. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fmO> North American Birds. The 2022 Fall season certainly did not disappoint with numerous first appearances for many islands. Pride of place to the first record of Elegant Tern in the West Indies reporting area—photographed on Grand Cayman. Other highlights included Grenada’s first Aplomado Falcon and Wattled Jacana; a Red-legged Honeycreeper in the Bahamas; a Gadwall in Antigua; and a Yellow-headed Blackbird in the Dominican read more >>

CODEBREAKERS: How to Find the Elusive Black Rail

By |April 26th, 2023|Field Ornithology|

One of the great things about birding is that some birds are incredibly challenging to find, requiring skill, patience, and, maybe most of all, luck. The ABA and Birding magazine are dedicated to helping birders increase their chances of finding the ABA Area’s most difficult birds by providing tips and tricks by top birding experts. That’s the philosophy behind the new Codebreakers series, of which Heather Hill’s column on finding Black Rails is the first entry.

April 2023 Photo Quiz

By |April 25th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

With this quiz photo, April seems to be setting up as raptorial-thing month in the ABA Photo Quiz. If I remember, perhaps that will continue next year. The color pattern immediately rules out all ABA-Area vulture species and falcon species, including Crested Caracara, leaving us with ...

Arkansas Region: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 1st, 2020|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2022. Winter 2020–2021: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-f4x> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include Common Merganser, Anna’s Hummingbird, Rufous Hummingbird, Cattle Egret, White Ibis, Prairie Falcon, Tropical Kingbird, White-eyed Vireo, Townsend’s Solitaire, Evening Grosbeak, Common Redpoll, Yellow Warbler, Summer Tanager. Swans through Mergansers Five Trumpeter Swans near Walnut Ridge 2 Feb were a first for Lawrence Co (Kent Freeman). Tundra Swans are annual or nearly so in Cleburne Co; one was at SEECO Lake off Hiram Road 15 Dec (Michael Linz, Patty McLean); read more >>

Arkansas Region: Fall 2021

By |August 1st, 2021|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Fall 2021: 1 Aug–30 Nov Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2023. Fall 2021: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-f4h> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights: Fulvous Whistling-Duck, Piping Plover, Black-legged Kittiwake, Neotropic Cormorant, Vermilion Flycatcher, Cave Swallow, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, Bewick's Wren, and Clay-colored Sparrow. Waterfowl Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks are suspected to be breeding at the Arkadelphia Oxidation Ponds (restricted access), Clark Co since two adults and three fledged young were seen here 12 Sep (Renn & Terry Tumlison). Five adults had been seen at this location in March and April. A very high number of 175 read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Fall 2021

By |August 7th, 2021|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

Fall 2021: 1 Aug–30 Nov W. Ross Silcock silcock@rosssilcock.com Chuck Otte cotte@twinvalley.net Joseph A. Grzybowski j_grzybowski@sbcglobal.net Recommended citation: Silcock W.R., C. Otte, J. Grzybowski. 2023. Fall 2021: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-f2H> North American Birds. Recent years have seen increasing reports of birds lingering quite late, and this fall was no exception. Fall was fairly slow in arriving, resulting in numerous sightings of tardy birds that many years would be noteworthy, but were commonplace this year. Along the same lines, perhaps fewer than normal unusual waterfowl were noted in the southern region because of read more >>

New Mexico: Fall 2021

By |August 1st, 2021|New Mexico, Regional Reports|

Fall 2021: 1 Aug–30 Nov Matthew J. Baumann mbaumann22@gmail.com Raymond L. VanBuskirk newmexicobirder@gmail.com Jodhan Fine jodhanfine22@gmail.com Andrew T. Theus andrewtheus93@gmail.com Recommended citation: Baumann, M. J., R. L. VanBuskirk, J. Fine., and A. Theus. 2021. Fall 2021: New Mexico. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-f2f> North American Birds. Fall 2021 was yet another drought-ridden season in the state of New Mexico. While there was not enough precipitation to majorly combat the effects of the ongoing drought, the state fortunately experienced an above average monsoon season, particularly in the southwest region. Most notable this season were two unprecedented first state read more >>

Atlantic Region: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Fall 2022: 1 Aug–30 Nov David Seeler dseeler@eastlink.ca Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2022. Fall 2022: Atlantic. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-f0w> North American Birds. The Eurasian strain of the highly pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) continued to affect the region. In the words of IL Jones, St. John’s Newfoundland, on 20 August 2022: “A substantial proportion of NL’s seabird breeding population has died this summer (I can hardly believe I am writing this). Common Murres and Northern Gannets seem to have been worst hit, with Atlantic Puffins possibly not as badly affected. Other seabirds like Razorbills and read more >>

Southern California: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|Regional Reports, Southern California|

Fall 2022: 1 August–30 November Guy McCaskie guymcc@pacbell.net Kimball L. Garrett cyanolyca818@gmail.com Recommended citation: McCaskie, G., and K. L. Garrett. Fall 2022: Southern California. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-f07> North American Birds. The Fall of 2022 in Southern California will be remembered for the quantity and quality of landbird vagrants along with some notable seabird rarities. The season began with another wave of near record heat through August and September, punctuated by some strong monsoonal rains on the deserts (including historic flooding in Death Valley). Remnants of Tropical Storm Kay, which had been a hurricane when off read more >>

Alabama & Mississippi: Spring 2022

By |March 1st, 2022|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–31 May Lawrence Gardella lfgardella@gmail.com Recommended citation: Gardella, Lawrence. 2023. Spring 2022: Alabama & Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eZN> North American Birds. . Birders this spring continued to find various birds expanding their ranges north, west, and south. Although overall migration was relatively slow, the season had its highlights, including several rarities, an influx of unusual numbers of eastern migrants to coastal Alabama and good numbers of American Golden-Plovers in several parts of the region. I once again thank Bob Duncan for much helpful information regarding the season’s weather. March started warm; dry read more >>

Ontario: Summer 2022

By |June 1st, 2022|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Summer 2022: 1 Jun–31 Jul Adam Capparelli adam.capparelli@mail.utoronto.ca Aaron Rusak afrusak@gmail.com Recommended citation: Capparelli, A., and A. Rusak. 2022. Summer 2022: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eZC> North American Birds. Summer 2022 was as uneventful in birds as it was in weather. Temperatures started off cooler and below seasonal in the beginning of June and this persisted for almost the entire month. Towards the end of June a high pressure system originating south of the border resulted in extreme heat and record-breaking temperatures in some areas of southern Ontario. The hot temperatures continued throughout July and into read more >>

Ontario: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Fall 2022: 1 Aug–30 Nov Adam Capparelli adam.capparelli@mail.utoronto.ca Aaron Rusak afrusak@gmail.com Recommended citation: Capparelli, A., and A. Rusak. 2023. Fall 2022: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eZr> North American Birds. Fall 2022 was unusually warm, not just in Ontario, but across all of Canada, with many provinces recording their warmest October ever. Starting from August, hot, summer-like weather continued well into September. The same was true with precipitation, with most of the province seeing near- or below-average precipitation. October and November continued the trend of warm weather in Ontario with southwest winds dominating the forecast. This unseasonably read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Fall 2022

By |August 1st, 2022|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Fall 2022: 1 Aug–30 Nov Rudolf Koes rkoes@mymts.net James Fox fox.james.ed@gmail.com Recommended citation: Koes, R.F., and J. Fox. 2023. Fall 2022: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eYW> North American Birds. Relatively mild and placid weather during much of the period enticed many migrants to linger beyond normal departure dates and resulted in a drawn-out overall migration. This came to an abrupt end during the second week of November, with cold temperatures and substantial snow, especially in the east of the region. Northern owls and winter finches remained scarce, a trend that continued into winter. Rare alcids read more >>

Alaska: Summer 2022

By |June 1st, 2022|Alaska, Regional Reports|

Summer 2022: 1 Jun–31 Jul Thede Tobish Tgtljo@gmail.com Recommended citation: Tobish, T. 2022. Summer 2022: Alaska. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eXV> North American Birds. Summer 2022 was a tale of two dominant weather conditions. Continuing from May was strengthening continental high pressure, characterized by widespread stable, warm, and dry conditions across the region. Record high temperatures and drought-like weather featured from the North Slope down to the Southeast. This spell of fine weather no doubt enhanced June breeding conditions but also allowed for one of the region’s worst fire seasons. Over three million acres had burned by read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Spring 2022

By |March 1st, 2022|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–31 May Rudolf Koes rkoes@mymts.net James Fox fox.james.ed@gmail.com Recommended citation: Koes, R.F., and J. Fox. 2022. Spring 2022: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eWY> North American Birds. After an abnormally dry 2021 the spring of 2022 became one of the wettest on record, particularly in southern Manitoba and southeastern Saskatchewan. A series of Colorado Lows brought snow, followed by rain, resulting in the wettest April since 1896 in Winnipeg, while May saw three times the normal amount of rain. Temperatures were also below normal throughout the region. Not withstanding these conditions, or perhaps read more >>

2024 ABA Community Weekend in Boulder, CO

By |June 13th, 2024|ABA Community Weekends|

July 13-14, 2024
Saturday, July 13, 2024, 8am: Guided birding field trip with Ted Floyd, Carl Bendorf, George Armistead, LeAnn Pilger, and Steve Ball
Saturday, July 13, 2024, 2pm: Bird watching vs. Bird photography by Steve Ball
Saturday, July 13, 2024, 7pm: Birds and Beers
Sunday, July 14, 2024, 8am: Guided birding field trip with Ted Floyd, Carl Bendorf, George Armistead, LeAnn Pilger, and Steve Ball
Sunday, July 14, 2024, 12:30 pm: Building Bridges with Birds by Tykee James

2024 ABA Community Weekend in Minneapolis, MN

By |April 19th, 2024|ABA Community Weekends|

May 25-26, 2024
Saturday, May 25, 2024, 8am: Birding by Bicycle Adventure with Dorian Anderson, Gregg Severson, and Kellie Hoyt
Saturday, May 25, 2024, 2pm: Birding Under the Influence: Cycling Across America in Search of Birds and Recovery by Dorian Anderson
Saturday, May 25, 2024, 7pm: Birds and Beers
Sunday, May 26, 2024, 7:30am: Birding from the Treetops with Brogan Alley and Steve Ball
Sunday, May 26, 2024, 2pm: Bird watching vs. bird photography by Steve Ball

Québec: Summer 2022

By |June 30th, 2022|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Summer 2022: 1 Jun–31 JulPierre Bannonpierre.bannon@icloud.comOlivier Bardeniridosornis@gmail.comNormand Davidnormanddavid@videotron.caSamuel Denaultsamueldenault@hotmail.comRecommended citation: Bannon, P., O. Barden, N. David  and S. Denault. 2022. Summer 2022: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eW3> North American Birds. Highlights in the province of Québec this summer included two Black-necked Stilts, a Royal Tern, a Sandwich Tern and a Rock Wren. More info on these and on other interesting birds seen in summer 2022 are following. All records are tentative until official acceptance by the Québec Bird Records Committee. DUCKS THROUGH VULTURESA group of seven Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks was reported at Rivière-Trois-Pistoles 5 Jun (Jean-Claude Pelletier), read more >>

Southern Atlantic: Winter 2020–2021

By |December 30th, 2020|Regional Reports, Southern Atlantic|

Winter 2020–2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Josh Jackson decaturjosh@gmail.com Rich Jackson rjcos@me.com Recommended citation: Jackson, J., and R. Jackson. 2021. Winter 2020–2021: Southern Atlantic. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eVV> North American Birds. The winter of 2020–2021 saw a “superflight” irruption of boreal finches all down the East Coast. While some backyard birders might have complained about the abundance of Pine Siskins eating them out of birdseed, others took the opportunity to go see Evening Grosbeaks, Red Crossbills and even a wayward Common Redpoll in their home state. South Carolina added to its state list with the arrival of a Townsend’s read more >>

March 2023 Photo Quiz

By |March 15th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

Driving down the road, you spot what seems an odd-looking bird for one perched on a roadside wire. You stop and get only a one- or two-second view before your presence flushes the bird into the nearby woodlot on private property.

WEBINAR: Birding & Nature Study on the Southern Ocean

By |March 1st, 2023|Current|

ABA Members can view the recording of this webinar here: https://www.aba.org/community/groups/programs-webinars/ The American Birding Association kicks off our Programs and Webinars, exclusively for members, with this outstanding travelogue by Ted Floyd. What: Join longtime Birding magazine Editor Ted Floyd for a virtual journey to the end of the Earth. Our expedition will take us from Tierra del Fuego to the Falklands to legendary South Georgia to the “Ice Continent” itself, Antarctica. Along the way, we will encounter staggering numbers of seabirds and marine mammals, along with otherworldly snowscapes and exhilarating seascapes. The presentation will be illustrated read more >>

Hawaii: Summer 2022

By |June 1st, 2022|Hawaii, Regional Reports|

Summer 2022: 1 Jun–31 Jul Alex Wang axwang12@gmail.com Jennifer Rothe jennifer.a.rothe@gmail.com Recommended citation: Wang, A. and J. Rothe. 2022. Summer 2022: Hawaii. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eMo> North American Birds. Summer in the Hawaii Region tends to be a relatively uneventful season for birding. Overwintering ducks and shorebirds have typically long since departed the region for their breeding grounds, though the occasional individual opts to remain in the islands rather than brave the perils of another trans-Pacific journey. Outside of typical migration windows, large oceanic storm systems represent the best chance to deliver rarities to the islands; read more >>

Oregon and Washington: Winter 2021-2022

By |December 1st, 2021|Oregon and Washington, Regional Reports|

Fall 2021: 1 Dec–28 Feb Eric Heisey heiseyew@gmail.com Adrian Hinkle adrian.hinkle@gmail.com Christopher Hinkle christopher.hinkle2@gmail.com Recommended citation: Heisey, E., Hinkle, A., Hinkle, C. 2022. Winter 2021–2022: Oregon-Washington. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eM9> North American Birds. There were few Covid-19-related cancellations, with good turnout on most CBCs. A single early December pelagic trip out of Newport ran as scheduled. December was wet, cold, and windy, with unusually low-elevation westside snow and ice during CBC season. Snowy conditions close to sea level led to the cancellation of the Yaquina Bay CBC in late December. Some other coastal CBCs suffered from read more >>

Volunteer Your Time and Talent!

By |February 22nd, 2023|Current|

Many of us can attribute our passion for birding to the people and groups who fostered our interest. A great way to give back to the birding community is to volunteer for a committee or board role with the ABA.  We are looking for help in a number of areas to help guide the organization in its growth.  These are opportunities to make a real difference in the organization and to work with some of the most accomplished birders on the continent.  Here are the areas of talent we are looking for support in: Consumer Marketing:  The read more >>

Coexistence to Conserve

By |February 17th, 2023|Current|

Indigenous Birders, Cattle Ranchers, and Conservation in Latin America
Birding and bird photography have become popular pursuits in Latin America, and, for many, even a career. This development applies also to Indigenous communities, where some people have discovered that they can use birding as a way to protect the area they live in while deriving a livelihood.

February 2023 Photo Quiz

By |February 15th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

While some may be confounded by this photo quiz, others will nail it immediately. One of the benefits of really looking at birds, really studying them, is the little kernels of knowledge that such scrutiny can impart, items that might, down the road, enable certain ID of a bird seen poorly.

Southern Atlantic: Fall 2020

By |August 7th, 2020|Regional Reports, Southern Atlantic|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Josh Jackson decaturjosh@gmail.com Rich Jackson rjcos@me.com Recommended citation: Jackson, J., and R. Jackson. 2021. Fall 2020: Southern Atlantic. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eCv> North American Birds. It was a wetter and warmer than average fall across most of GA, SC, and NC, and a record 30 tropical storms were given names in the North Atlantic Basin. The continuation of the COVID-19 pandemic saw a number of new birders finding entertainment in their backyards or chasing notable rarities, such as the Brown Booby that remained on GA’s Lake Lanier for more than two read more >>

Arkansas & Louisiana: Fall 2020

By |August 1st, 2020|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Fall 2020: 1 Aug–30 Nov Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2023. Fall 2020: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eAP> North American Birds. Seasonal Highlights include Common Ground-Dove, Rufous Hummingbird, Yellow Rail, Black Rail, Long-billed Curlew, Laughing Gull, Swallow-tailed Kite, Fork-tailed Flycatcher, and Evening Grosbeak. WATERFOWL THROUGH GALLINULES An estimated 20,000 Greater White-fronted Geese were just east of Lodge’s Corner, Arkansas Co 15 Oct (Kenny & LaDonna Nichols). Sea ducks this season included a Surf Scoter at Big Lake WMA, Mississippi Co 2 Nov (Timothy P. Jones); a single Black Scoter at Alma Wastewater Plant, read more >>

January 2023 Photo Quiz

By |January 20th, 2023|Photo Quiz|

There are at least two features that often distinguish between skilled, experienced birders and others when it comes to large flocks of birds. The first is the understanding that just because many or most of the individuals of a large flock of birds appear to be referable to the same species does not necessarily mean that such an assumption is true for the entire flock.

New England: Spring 2022

By |March 1st, 2022|New England, Regional Reports|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–31 May Greg Hanisek ctgregh@gmail.com Recommended citation: Hanisek, G. 2022. Spring 2022: New England. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eux> North American Birds. Shorebirds were noteworthy among a variety of early arrivals. In Massachusetts only two species, American Oystercatcher and Whimbrel, were later than the average arrival date for this century.  An April 11–12 cold front produced what veteran observer Rick Heil considered one of the best April fallouts he's seen on Plum Island. Sub-regional Compilers Louis Bevier (Maine), Kent MacFarland (Vermont), Steve Mirick (New Hampshire), Bob Stymeist, Neil Heyward (Massachusetts), Rachel Farrell (Rhode Island), read more >>

Crested Terns in Florida

By |January 6th, 2023|Field Ornithology|

While the tern complex does not contain as many species as the gull complex and therefore is not as confounding, the identification of Thalasseus terns nonetheless can be challenging. In addition to the normal variation in body size and coloration of bare parts such as bills and legs, identification can be hampered by continent-crossing vagrants that may breed with related species in both North America and in Europe, creating hybrids and back-crosses.

December 2022 Photo Quiz

By |December 16th, 2022|Photo Quiz|

While some might immediately recognize the species represented here, others may have to work out the ID. That difference is often the primary one between skilled, experienced birders and others. Research on how skilled practitioners of birding has shown that such use a different portion of their brains to identify individuals of species they know well than do birders that do not know the species well or at all.

Atlantic Region: Summer 2022

By |June 1st, 2022|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Summer 2022: 1 Jun–31 Jul David Seeler dseeler@eastlink.ca Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2022. Summer 2022: Atlantic Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-elk> North American Birds. It was warm and humid this season with rainfall less than normal for most of the region. Avian Flu/H5N1 continued its devastating course through the region’s avian species this season There has been a significant impact on domestic species as well as those species that live in densely packed colonies throughout the region. Evidence of spread to marine and terrestrial mammals has been documented for the region. Species of note for the read more >>

Arkansas & Louisiana: Spring 2020

By |March 1st, 2020|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Spring 2020: 1 Mar–31 May Lyndal York lrbluejay@gmail.com Recommended citation: York, L. 2022. Spring 2020: Arkansas Region. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eld> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include Cinnamon Teal, Red-necked Grebe, Long-billed Curlew, Brown Booby, breeding Roseate Spoonbills, Swallow-tailed Kite, Lesser Goldfinch, and Scott’s Oriole. Waterfowl through Shorebirds Very rare transient Cinnamon Teals were at Hiwasse, Benton 17 Apr (Patti Bertschy) and Dardanelle, Yell Co 25–26 Apr (Kenny & LaDonna Nichols. Notable lingering waterfowl included: a Greater Scaup at Bald Knob NWR, White Co 9 May (Glenn & Michelle Wyatt); a Common read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Summer 2022

By |June 1st, 2022|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Summer 2022: 1 Jun–30 Jul Rudolf Koes rkoes@mymts.net James Fox fox.james.ed@gmail.com Recommended citation: Koes, R.F., and J. Fox. 2022. Summer 2022: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ekO> North American Birds. The summer of 2022 was hot across the Prairie Provinces and very wet, especially in southern Manitoba and southeastern Saskatchewan, continuing a trend started in the spring. Alberta experienced some very destructive storms. Although the shorebird migration at both ends of the season was lacklustre, the copious rains created areas with sheetwater on agricultural fields in southern Manitoba, which attracted a decent number and variety of read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Summer 2022

By |June 1st, 2022|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

Summer 2022: 1 Jun–31 Jul Andrew Dobson (Greater Antilles and Bermuda) andrewdobs@gmail.com Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) Anthony.levesque@wanadoo.fr Recommended citation: Dobson, A., and A. Levesque. 2022. Summer 2022: West Indies & Bermuda. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ekE> North American Birds. Cuba recorded its first Great-tailed Grackle and the Turks and Caicos Islands, their first Black Tern. The first breeding of Antillean Euphonia was proven in Guadeloupe. Seawatching highlights included a Bulwer’s Petrel off Guadeloupe and two South Polar Skuas off Bermuda. Waterfowl through Terns Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks are rare in Bermuda with two first reported read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Spring 2022

By |March 1st, 2022|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–30 Apr Andrew Dobson (Greater Antilles and Bermuda) andrewdobs@gmail.com Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) Anthony.levesque@wanadoo.fr Recommended citation: Dobson, A. and A. Levesque. 2022. Spring 2022: West Indies & Bermuda. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ekq> North American Birds. Cuba recorded its first Brant; Saint Vincent and the Grenadines documented its first Green Kingfisher; a Bald Eagle in Bermuda was the first for 34 years; and Guadeloupe recorded its second White-winged Tern. Waterfowl to Shorebirds Two Black-bellied Whistling Ducks were seen at Harrington Sound, Bermuda 31 May (Kieran Richardson). A Fulvous Whistling-Duck was read more >>

Hudson-Delaware Region: Summer 2022

By |June 1st, 2022|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

Summer 2022: 1 Jun–31 Jul Robert O. Paxton rop1@columbia.edu Amy Davis adavis@aba.org Shaibal S. Mitra shaibal.mitra@csi.cuny.edu Frank Rohrbacher rohrbaf@aol.com Recommended citation: Paxton, R. O., Amy Davis, Shaibal S. Mitra, and Frank Rohrbacher. 2022. Summer 2022: Hudson-Delaware. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ekd> North American Birds. Summer 2022 was hot and, in the region’s north, dry. In New York City, the average temperature in June was 79°F compared with an average of 71.4°F, while total precipitation in June was only 2.92” as compared with an average of 3.56”. Rainfall in Rochester in June was only 2.04” as compared with read more >>

Southern California: Summer 2022

By |June 1st, 2022|Regional Reports, Southern California|

Summer 2022: 1 Jun–31 Jul Guy McCaskie guymcc@pacbell.net Kimball L. Garrett cyanolyca818@gmail.com Recommended citation: McCaskie, G., and K. L. Garrett. 2022. Summer 2022: Southern California. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eiY> North American Birds. Weather conditions through the summer period typified the 21st century pattern of reduced coastal marine layer influence, very dry terrestrial conditions, and lots of heat. Monsoon conditions (which proved to be well above average in August and September) had not arrived by the end of July. There were no major brush fires through the period, though a number of smaller fires burned in most read more >>

Southern California: Spring 2022

By |March 1st, 2022|Regional Reports, Southern California|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–31 May Guy McCaskie guymcc@pacbell.net Kimball L. Garrett cyanolyca818@gmail.com Recommended citation: McCaskie, G., and K. L. Garrett. 2022. Spring 2022: Southern California. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-eiG> North American Birds. It was something of a lackluster spring over most of the Region, punctuated by a predictable sprinkling of rarities. There was intensive monitoring of early morning visible migration of landbirds at various sites, most notably Bear Divide in the western San Gabriel Mts. of Los Angeles Co, the area around Gorman in the northwest corner of Los Angeles Co, Mt. Soledad in La Jolla, read more >>

Ontario: Spring 2022

By |March 1st, 2022|Ontario, Regional Reports|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–31 May Adam Capparelli adam.capparelli@mail.utoronto.ca Aaron Rusak afrusak@gmail.com Recommended citation: Capparelli, A., and A. Rusak. 2022. Spring 2022: Ontario. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ehQ> North American Birds. We would like to extend our gratitude to Blake A. Mann, Maureen Riggs, Brian Ratcliff, Carter Dorscht, and Jeremy L. Hatt for regional reporting, Andrew Keaveney for assistance in data logistics, and Matt Parsons, Cesar Ponce, Markus Legzdins, and Jarmo Jalava for contributing the photo highlights for this report. March was a month of tumultuous weather with a mix of unusual warmth and winter weather but ended read more >>

Québec: Spring 2022

By |March 1st, 2022|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–31 May Pierre Bannon pierre.bannon@icloud.com Olivier Barden iridosornis@gmail.com Normand David normanddavid@videotron.ca Samuel Denault samueldenault@hotmail.com Recommended citation: Bannon, P., O. Barden, N. David  and S. Denault. 2022. Spring 2022: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ehA> North American Birds. Spring is a good season to see vagrant birds and this year was no exception. Among the waterfowl, Québec birders had the opportunity to see old world species like Tundra Bean-Goose, Pink-footed Goose, Barnacle Goose, Tufted Duck, and Common Pochard. Furthermore, the record-breaking numbers of Golden Eagles and Broad-winged Hawks southwest of Montréal astounded hawkwatchers. Finally, a read more >>

Western Great Lakes: Summer 2022

By |June 1st, 2022|Regional Reports, Western Great Lakes|

Summer 2022: 1 Jun–31 Jul William Marengo wcmarengo@gmail.com Recommended citation: Marengo, W. 2022. Summer 2022: Western Great Lakes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ehf> North American Birds. Dry conditions prevailed throughout the season. There was good news for one regional breeding specialty but discouraging news for another. Unusual for summer, the region experienced a parade of impressive rarities. A total of at least six first state records were found, one being a first United States record, amongst the other accidentals. Note that many of the casual and accidental species have yet to be reviewed by the state’s records read more >>

Celebrating the 2022 ABA Award Recipients: Peter Pyle, Holly Merker, Ted Floyd, and Nate Swick

By |November 22nd, 2022|Current|

On behalf of the ABA Board of Directors and staff, the ABA Awards Committee is delighted to announce the winners of the 2022 ABA Awards. This year, the ABA Awards Committee is happy to recognize one recipient of the ABA Lifetime Achievement Award, also called “The Tropicbird,” one recipient of the Award for Conservation and Education, and two recipients of the Award for Distinguished Service. ABA Awards are given to birders who have done exceptional work in promoting the cause of birding.

Western Great Lakes: Spring 2022

By |March 1st, 2022|Regional Reports, Western Great Lakes|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–31 May William Marengo wcmarengo@gmail.com Recommended citation: Marengo, W. 2022. Spring 2022: Western Great Lakes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-een> North American Birds. Numerous rarities were seen this spring, especially from Wisconsin. Highlights include Fulvous-whistling Duck, Sharp-tailed Sandpiper and Ash-throated Flycatcher. Note that many of the casual and accidental species have yet to be reviewed by the state’s records committees. This report will be updated accordingly as the committees review the records. Sub-regional Compilers Sunil Gopalan (Wisconsin), Andrew Simon (Michigan), Ethan Urban (Michigan) Abbreviations LP (Lower Peninsula, MI), NWR (National Wildlife Refuge), SGA (State read more >>

Hawaii: Spring 2022

By |March 1st, 2022|Hawaii, Regional Reports|

Spring 2022: 1 Mar–31 May Alex Wang axwang12@gmail.com Jennifer Rothe jennifer.a.rothe@gmail.com Recommended citation: Wang, A and J. Rothe. 2022. Spring 2022: Hawaii. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ebq> North American Birds. While spring in the Hawaii Region largely lacks the blatant climactic cues experienced elsewhere in much of the ABA area, there are nonetheless subtle indicators of seasonal shift present in the islands. The vernal season generally marks the transition from rainy winter weather to drier days; however, this spring was unusually dry, with drought conditions present on multiple islands. Still, shorebirds and seabirds transited through Hawaiian waters read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Summer 2021

By |June 1st, 2022|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

Summer 2021: 1 Jun–31 Jul Joseph A. Grzybowski j_grzybowski@sbcglobal.net W. Ross Silcock silcock@rosssilcock.com Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J.A., and W.R. Silcock. 2022. Summer 2021: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-ebh> North American Birds. Overall, this was a fairly routine summer with an array of summer vagrants and some surprise and suspected extralimital breeding across taxonomic groups.  A large colony of American White Pelicans in Nebraska were a pleasant discovery.  More Osprey are now nesting in the region south to eastern Oklahoma.  Black-bellied Whistling Ducks, an exceptional rarity 30 years ago, are now spreading across the region. read more >>

October 2022 Photo Quiz

By |October 20th, 2022|Photo Quiz|

As any of the folks that have conducted migrating-waterbird counts – seawatches – can say, ducks in flight are relatively straightforward to identify. First, there’s flight style, which does a reasonably good job of allowing quick discernment as to whether one is looking at dabblers or divers...

Welcome to ABA Community!

By |October 20th, 2022|Current|

Go To ABA Community >> We're delighted to welcome ABA members to our newest project: ABA Community. This online platform was inspired by the printed ABA Member Directory that served as a way for members to connect with fellow birders and trip guides many years ago. Today we are happy to share a new way to connect within a safe online network accessed through your ABA membership. To use ABA Community you must be an ABA Member. What can you do at ABA Community? Connect and interact with fellow birders. Engage in groups focused on different birding read more >>