Atlantic: Winter 2022–2023

Winter 2022–2023: 1 Dec–28 Feb

David Seeler
dseeler@eastlink.ca

Recommended citation:

Seeler, D. 2023. Winter 2022–2023: Atlantic. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-fEn> North American Birds.

Above average temperatures, and significantly less precipitation for the southeastern portions of the Region were present through January. As a result, open waterways, bays, and bodies of water like the Gulf of St. Lawrence remained ice free for most of the season, while inland, fields were often close to snow free. These conditions were perfect for lingering species to remain to exceptionally late dates—or overwinter—and allowed vagrants to linger as well. Two weather systems enhanced the presence of vagrants to the Region. The first was the number of Colorado Lows that swept across the Continent towards, but not often directly influencing, the southeastern portions of the Region. The wind patterns associated with these systems would potentially carry western vagrants into the Region. Emeritus Professor Feldstein best defines the second system as follows: “Hi Everyone. It looks like the occurrence of the Black-tailed Godwit here in Nova Scotia and other Palearctic vagrants in Atlantic Canada and New England is associated with the negative phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). Furthermore, it appears that this negative NAO was triggered by the tropical Madden-Julian Oscillation, the most prominent atmospheric mode of intra-seasonal variability in the tropics. Therefore, it is likely that the Black-tailed Godwit and other Palearctic vagrants have their origin in a weather event that occurred in the tropical Pacific.”

Reports of significance included Graylag Goose, Barnacle Goose, Common Ringed Plover, Black-tailed Godwit, Common Snipe, Gray Heron, Barn Owl, Eurasian Blackbird, Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch, and Green-tailed Towhee. Also significant was the number of species attempting to overwinter and the late date records created as a result.

Waterfowl through Skimmer

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Update on avian flu in Newfoundland seabirds: By autumn 2022 it was apparent that Newfoundland had experienced a catastrophic seabird mortality event, related to the arrival of a highly pathogenic H5N1 avian flu strain that originated in Asian commercial waterfowl production. Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCA, Canadian Wildlife Service) and many volunteer members of the public counted and collected carcasses during summer 2022 that could include some birds not killed by avian flu. The rough estimates of carcasses reported to date for insular Newfoundland include:  6000+ Northern Gannet, 6000+ for Common Murre, about 100 for Razorbill, 200 for Atlantic Puffin and 100 for Black-legged Kittiwake (fide Bill Montevecchi, Stephanie Avery-Gomm). These counts likely do not include all beach cast birds from Newfoundland’s lengthy mostly inaccessible coastline, nor do they include carcasses that drifted out to sea and were never found, or not reported. Carcasses washed ashore especially near Cape St. Mary’s on the Avalon Peninsula where prevailing southwest winds blow onshore.  Mortality was also evident on the east side of the Avalon Peninsula (Witless Bay) but fewer carcasses were beach cast there, presumably due to prevailing offshore winds. It is unclear how the Common Murres and Northern Gannets at Funk Island were affected. ECCC scientists are currently working on modelling to obtain rigorous quantitative mortality estimates. Additional mass mortality was not apparent during October-February, when most of the affected species have normally moved out of the region. However, a Manx Shearwater was photographed dying at sea off Cape St. Mary’s, Placentia Bay, NL October 24, 2022 with distinctive avian flu behaviour symptoms (‘lethargic, head shaking, repeatedly looking back over shoulder in exaggerated twitching manner, gaping, uncoordinated swimming, bedraggled appearance low in water’). Common and Thick-billed Murre sampling from the Newfoundland Murre hunt has shown no birds positive for the H5N1 flu strain although some tests were inconclusive and will be subjected to further analysis (fide AL). In St. John’s, aggregations of overwintering waterfowl in the city showed no sign of major die offs, but two feral Mute Swans and several ducks perished in a St. John’s park in early March. At the time of writing, scientific understanding of the properties of this H5N1 virus strain is still emerging. Migratory birds will be carrying segments of different variants (if not entire variants) across continents, and new outbreaks in wild birds continue. Scientists recognize that this H5N1 outbreak presents an ongoing extreme risk to colonial water bird populations, and that humans and their activities remain the main factor involved in facilitating the evolution and spread of new strains.

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Snow Geese lingered well into the season in Nova Scotia with individuals at Bellevue North, Yarmouth Co 27 Dec–13 Jan (ph. Paul Gould, m. ob.), in New Glasgow, Pictou Co 5 Jan (ph. Ken McKenna), and a blue morph Snow Goose along the Harvest Moon Trail, Kings Co 9–12 Jan (Jake Walker, m. ob.). More impressive was the presence of 30 Snow Geese in Mahone Bay, Lunenburg Co NS 10 Jan (Joshua Michael-Sievers), an unusually late date. An exceptionally wary and elusive Graylag Goose, accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador, lingered in the Harricott area, Avalon Peninsula 3–11 Dec (Edmund Hayden, ph. Charles Fitzpatrick, m. ob.) providing the fourth overall record, and a second winter record to that province. Casual to Nova Scotia, the Greater White-fronted Goose that lingered in the Berwick Sewage Lagoons, Kings Co 12 Dec–30 Jan (Wayne Green, ph. Richard McKay, m. ob.) provided the sole report of that species for the region. A Pink-footed Goose, casual to Nova Scotia, that first appeared at Mill Creek Landing, Kings Co 8–15 Feb, and later relocated to Wellington Dyke, Kings Co 21–23 Feb (ph. Bernie Brown, m. ob.) provided the only report of the species other than the long-term resident Pink-footed Goose in St. John’s NL. Casual to insular Newfoundland, a Barnacle Goose was at the Stephenville Crossing Estuary, St. George’s-Stephenville 1 Jan–2 Feb (ph. Denise McIsaac, ph. Randolph White et al.). Northern Shovelers, casual to Prince Edward Island in winter, lingered well into the season. This was perhaps due to the overall warmer weather conditions and open waterways. Two Northern Shovelers were reported along Clement Road, Prince Co PE 19 Jan (ph. Donna Martin), while 10 individuals—five males and five females—were in the Cavendish Farm’s Sewage Lagoons, New Annan, Prince Co PE 28 Jan (ph. vt. Melanie McCarthy).

A Green-winged Teal (ssp. crecca), casual to St. Pierre et Miquelon, was at Étang Boulot, St. Pierre Island 4–29 Dec (ph. Joël Detcheverry et al.). Unexpected in winter, a Redhead lingered into the season at Abbot’s Pond, Port-au-Port Peninsula, St. George’s-Stephenville NL through 12 Dec (ph. Kathy Marche et al.). Casual—and out of place—to Prince Edward Island in winter, two Ring-necked Ducks were at Black Pond, Kings Co 21 Feb (ph. Roberta Palmer). Accidental to St. Pierre et Miquelon, a Tufted Duck found at the Grand Étang, Miquelon Island 9 Feb (ph. Laurent Jackman) provided the French Isles with their fourth record (fide Roger Etcheberry). The discovery of a male Tufted Duck in Rustico Bay, Queens Co PE 27 Feb+ (ph. Donna Martin, m. ob.) provided that province with its sixth record. Nine Lesser Scaup were reported on the French Isles this season. This species has been present in very low numbers on SPM only for 13 out of the last 27 winters (fide Roger Etcheberry). Hooded Merganser has been considered casual to St. Pierre et Miquelon since 1996, yet they have been reported in the winters of 2021 and 2022 (fide Roger Etcheberry). This season, a Hooded Merganser lingered into the season and overwintered at Étang Boulot, St. Pierre Island (Valérie Jackman, Laurent Jackman et al.).

Also casual to the French Isles, Common Mergansers were present in the region in good numbers with individuals reported at Pointe du Diamant, St. Pierre Island 12 Dec (Laurent Malthieux), while up to two were at La Pointe, St. Pierre Island 20 Dec–9 Feb (ph. Laurent Jackman, ph. Joël Detcheverry). One Common Merganser was at the Barachois, St. Pierre Island SPM 30 Dec and 5 Jan (ph. Valérie Jackman), two individuals were at the Étang Boulot, St. Pierre Island SPM 5–6 Feb (ph. Valérie Jackman, ph. Joël Detcheverry), and lastly one Common Merganser was in Le Port, St. Pierre Island 6 Jan and 18 Feb (Laurent Jackman, Patrick Hacala). In the past only one or two individuals were observed in winter since 2012 (fide Roger Etcheberry). Ruddy Duck is very rare to Nova Scotia in winter, yet this winter 13 individuals were present. The lingering Eurasian Collared-Dove at Melvern Square, Kings Co was last reported 26 Feb (Polo Matteucci, m. ob.). Two White-winged Doves were present this season: the first was at Chéticamp, Inverness Co NS 1 Dec (Brian Rolek), while the second individual at Fox Harbour, Avalon Peninsula NL 8 Feb (ph. Gloria Healy) provided that province with its eighth winter record. The presence of four Sandhill Cranes in Nova Scotia this season was remarkable. First reported in flight at Glen Haven, Halifax Co 14 Feb (ph. Judy Keating), they were then reported in the New Minas area, Kings Co NS 15 Feb (Sarah Foote). The four Sandhill Cranes then relocated to the Upper Granville area, Annapolis Co NS 21–23 Feb (ph. Larry Neily, ph. Lyall Bouchard et al.). An American Coot that over-wintered on l’Étang Boulot, St. Pierre Island 1 Dec+ (Laurent Jackman, m. ob.) was only the third one to do so.

A Common Ringed Plover at Sunday Point, Kelley’s Cove, Yarmouth Co NS 11–12 Jan (ph. Erin Olsen, m. ob.) provided the province with its third record, and its first winter record. The Black-tailed Godwit along the Salt Marsh Trail and area, Halifax Co NS 16–19 Dec (ph. Gary Poole, ph. David Currie, ph. Ray Wershler et al.) provided that province with its third record. Exceptionally unusual for Prince Edward Island, seven Sanderlings found along the shoreline west of Basin Head Provincial Park, Kings Co 31 Dec+ (ph. Hélène Blanchet) lingered through the season. Accidental to Prince Edward Island in winter, three Long-billed Dowitchers located at Seal River, Queens Co 29 Jan–5 Feb (ph. Scott Sinclair, Fiep de Bie, Cindy Esau et al.) were exceptionally late and provided the second through fourth winter records for the province. Long-billed Dowitcher is casual to Nova Scotia in winter with eight being reported this season. However, exceptionally late was the Long-billed Dowitcher at Chezzetcook, Halifax Co NS 19 Feb (ph. Susan Myers, ph. Pat McKay). The fortuitous discovery of a Common Snipe in Portugal Cove South, Avalon Peninsula NL 13 Jan (ph. Bruce Di Labio, ph. Bruce Mactavish) provided that province with it fourth record of the species. Casual in winter, and exceptionally late to Nova Scotia, three Lesser Yellowlegs were present along the Salt Marsh Trail and area, Halifax Co 18 Dec–25 Jan (ph. Robert Martin, m. ob.), while another was present at Argyle Head, Yarmouth Co 30 Jan–1 Feb (ph. Paul Gould et al.). These individuals represented the sole reports of Lesser Yellowlegs to the region. The 21 Greater Yellowlegs reported within Nova Scotia this season were the only individuals of this species noted within the region—with the last of these being reported at Grand Desert, Beach Island, Halifax Co NS 22 Jan (ph. Joanne Close).

A Franklin’s Gull discovered ay Ballantyne’s Cove, Antigonish Co NS 16 Jan+ (ph. Ken McKenna et al.) provided the province with its second winter record. Casual in winter to Newfoundland and Labrador, a Forster’s Tern was present in the Conception Bay area, Avalon Peninsula 1–6 Dec (ph. Jared Clarke, Stan and Lori Isley, m. ob.). It is likely this was the same individual reported at Spaniard’s Bay, Avalon Peninsula, NL last November (fide Jared Clarke).

Loons through Larks

A Sooty Shearwater offshore of McNutt’s Island, Shelburne Co NS 5 Jan (ph. Mike O’Callaghan) was not only exceptionally late, but the fifth winter record for Nova Scotia. Two Great Shearwaters observed offshore of The Hawk, Cape Sable Island, Shelburne Co 1 Dec (Logan Moore) were the only individuals reported for the region. Also exceptionally late—again likely due to the warmer than average winter for Prince Edward Island—a Great Blue Heron lingered into the season along the Crapaud River, Queens Co through 18 Feb (Daphne Davey). An immature Gray Heron that arrived in the Argyle Head area, Yarmouth Co NS 27 Jan+ (ph. Mark and Sandra Dennis, ph. Alix d’Entremont, m. ob.) provided the province with its second record and its first winter record of the species. Particularly rare in winter to Nova Scotia, six Great Egrets were in Nova Scotia, while New Brunswick reported only one. The sole report of Snowy Egret within the region was that of an individual that lingered into the season on Cape Sable Island, Shelburne Co NS through 31 Jan (Mark Dennis et al.). Casual to Nova Scotia, at least six Red-shouldered Hawks were reported, while in New Brunswick where they are considered uncommon, only two were noted. A deceased Barn Owl found in a barn at Ebenezer, Queens Co PE 16 Feb (Walter Andrews, ph. Vanessa Bonnyman) provided the province with its second record. Only one Snowy Owl was reported on the French Isles, that of an individual on the Isthmus, 2 Jan (fide Roger Etcheberry), where they are considered common in winter. Accidental in winter to St. Pierre et Miquelon, a Northern Saw-whet Owl at La Réserve, St. Pierre Island 9 Feb (ph. Joël Detcheverry, Patrick Hacala, ph. Jean-Denis Rebmann) provided the fourth record for the French Isles (fide Roger Etcheberry).

Red-bellied Woodpecker is casual to Prince Edward Island, where four individuals were present this season. A female Red-bellied Woodpecker lingered through the season at Horne Cross Road, Queens Co (ph. Vanessa Bonnyman). Another female Red-bellied Woodpecker was in Hyde Park, Cornwall, Queens Co 2 Jan (Melanie McCarthy, Vanessa Bonnyman), and a female Red-bellied Woodpecker was in Summerside, Prince Co 25 Jan+ (ph. Donna Martin). The last individual was a male Red-bellied Woodpecker at Earnscliffe, Queens Co 29 Jan (Scott Sinclair, Fiep de Bie) and 2 Feb (ph. Donna Martin, ph. Roberta Palmer). Downy and Hairy Woodpeckers were well represented on St. Pierre et Miquelon this season, a situation that is quite unusual for winter on the French Isles (fide Roger Etcheberry). American Kestrel is casual to Prince Edward Island where individuals were reported in Charlottetown 2 and 18 Jan (ph. Melanie McCarthy, ph. Vanessa Bonnyman), in North Carleton, Prince Co 17 Jan (ph. Donna Martin), and at China Point, Queens Co 12 Feb (Sarah Hirtle), all very late dates for that province. A Great Crested Flycatcher was an excellent find at Port La Tour, Shelburne Co NS 11 Dec (ph. Julie Smith et al.), and represented the sole report of that species for the region. There were six reports of Eastern Phoebe in Nova Scotia where they are very rare in winter. Again, these were the sole reports for the region.

Swallows through Dickcissel

Six Barns Swallows at Daniel’s Head, Cape Sable Island, Shelburne Co NS lingered into the season to 3 Dec (Logan Moore et al.), an exceptionally late date. Casual to Prince Edward Island, two White-breasted Nuthatches were along the Hyde Park Trail, Cornwall, Queens Co 30 Jan (ph. Roberta Palmer). A White-breasted Nuthatch in Stephenville, St. George’s-Stephenville NL 6–19 Feb (ph. Kathy Marche, ph. Denise McIsaac) provided the province with its four record overall and its second winter record for the species. The two Carolina Wrens previously reported in Summerside, Prince Co PE were last observed in late Feb (Donna Dehmel). Particularly rare to Nova Scotia in winter, individual House Wrens were at the Beaufort Drive Wetland, Halifax Co 2–3 Dec (ph. Jim Edsall, Mike Jones), and in Port William’s, Kings Co 7–10 Dec (au. George Forsyth), and along Windmill Road, Dartmouth 18 Dec (Karel Allard, Sarah Wing). Rare to Nova Scotia in winter, four Marsh Wren were reported this season, the only reports for the region. Casual to insular Newfoundland, individual Northern Mockingbirds were at Tor’s Cove, Avalon Peninsula 10 Dec–25 Feb (ph. Lisa Sells, m. ob.), and in St John’s along the Rennie’s River 6 Jan+ (ph. Blair Fleming, m. ob.). Casual vagrants to New Brunswick, a female Mountain Bluebird was at Little Shemogue, Westmorland Co 11–12 Dec (ph. Shawn Chapman, m. ob.) while a male Mountain Bluebird was reported at High Marsh Road, Sackville, Westmorland Co 22 Dec (Tim Corner et al.). A Wood Thrush at Conception Bay South, Avalon Peninsula NL 29 Dec (ph. Renée Griffin) provided that province with its first winter record.

The discovery of a Eurasian Blackbird in Cartwright, Labrador-Happy Valley-Goose Bay NL 20 Dec+ (Jeff and Tracy Martin, ph. Vernon Buckle et al.) was an unexpected find, that provided the province with its second record. A Redwing was reported at Gaspereau, Kings Co NS 31 Dec (Phil Taylor) by eBird. The arrival of a Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch that lingered in the yard of Lynette Barnes of Green Bay, Lunenburg Co NS 11–25 Jan (ph. Lynette Barnes) was an exceptional surprise to the homeowners. Word of this rarity did not make it to the birding community until 21 Jan, and subsequently, it was observed by many (ph. Jason Dain, m. ob.). This Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch provided Nova Scotia, and the region with their first records of this species. Common Redpoll is generally quite common to St. Pierre et Miquelon in winter. However, this season only one was observed in the Village of St. Pierre, St. Pierre Island 18 Feb (ph. Laurent Jackman). Exceptionally rare to Nova Scotia, a Lark Sparrow in Halifax 4–11 Dec (ph. Joanne Cook, ph. Patrick Kelly) provided the only report for the region. Clay-colored Sparrow is casual to insular Newfoundland in winter so the discovery of an individual in St. John’s 3 and 17 Dec (ph. Sheldon Anthony, Ethel Dempsey) was a good find. Casual to Nova Scotia in winter, three Field Sparrows were reported: one in the Town of Canso, Guysborough Co 28 Dec (ph. Mark and Sandra Dennis), at Grand Pré, Kings Co 22–29 Jan (Jake Walker, m. ob.), and along the Harvest Moon Trail, Kings Co 25 Jan–3 Feb (ph. Rick Whitman et al.).

The presence of a Brewer’s Sparrow at the feeders of Tracy and Tony Mass mid-Jan+ took time not only to process, but identify. The probable identity and presence of the sparrow was only made public 29 Jan after serious consideration of Tracy Maas’s images, the collection of additional documentary photographs, and consultations with others as to the identity of the Spizella subspecies. Pending acceptance of the identity of the Brewer’s Sparrow, it will become the first record for New Brunswick and only the second record for the region—the previous being at Hartlen Point, Halifax Co NS 6–8 Oct 1991.

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Sun 2023-01-29 1:34 PM

To: NatureNB on behalf of Paul Mansz

Re: Probable BREWER’S SPARROW

A Clay-colored Sparrow (CCSP) visiting a feeder in Quispamsis was reported to Jim Wilson, who felt that it was “off” for CCSP. After several visits to observe the sparrow, additional research, and wider consultation, we believe this is very probably a Brewer’s Sparrow (BRSP). If confirmed, it would represent the first (confirmed) sighting for the province. We must emphasize that this is a probable identification. While we await confirmation from other experts (both from here and from the locale where BRSP is expected) we felt the word should be put out so that any interested naturalists could see the bird, just in case.

The hosts of this bird, and the feeders it is visiting, are Tracy and Tony Maas, from 112 Sherwood in Quispamsis, a red-roofed home at the corner of Sherwood Dr. and Allan a Dale Lane. In discussion with Tracy and Tony, please park near their driveway on Allan A Dale Lane on the Maas’ side of the road (not both sides). Avoid obstructing traffic. The bird frequents their driveway where feed has been scattered, and bird feeders are at its side. Other sparrows (Song, White-throated, American Tree) and juncos are generally present with the bird, and good views can be had of it on the driveway. There is another feeder at the rear of their house but please respect their privacy (and that of their neighbours) and avoid approaching from Sherwood Drive. Tracy and Tony have been gracious hosts, and welcome the interest of other birders.

Some rationale for the BRSP identification: 1. Supercilium patch is markedly duller than the sub-moustachial area (CCSP would be very similar in tone); 2. The collar shows streaking (quite marked at the rear to less so at the sides); CCSP would show none to little; 3. There is no distinct white crown line/marking; 4. Several of the middle and greater wing coverts show a black central area extending toward the tips of the feathers in points; CCSP has cleaner edges to these black areas (and do not extend to the tips of the feathers); 5. Full, dull, eye ring; 6. Overall less distinct markings, grayer vs. warm tone (esp. when compared with Tree Sparrows that were present at the same time); 7. 2022 hatch-year birds would have molted into their adult plumage by now (in fact, several months previous to the initial sighting); this individual would not be showing juvenile plumage characteristics; 8. Finely streaked brown rump (which can be seen in one of Jim’s pictures, where he cropped a close-up view)

As the weather warms and spring encroaches, our plan is to gather recordings of the individual’s call and, ideally, its song. Keep in mind: 1. 2022 hatch-year birds would have molted into their adult plumage by now (in fact, several months ago); avoid focusing on juvenile plumage characteristics for this individual; 2. CCSP has both breeding and non-breeding plumage (the latter being expected now); BRSP does not. Respectfully yours, Paul Mansz.

Sun 2023-01-29 7:08 PM

To: NatureNB on behalf of Jim Wilson

Re: A Very Interesting Sparrow

The reason I was watchful and picked up on this bird is that I happened to see a photo online a while back of a Brewer’s somewhere in the East that struck me as looking remarkably similar to a Clay-colored Sparrow. I hadn’t realized that a Brewer’s could look like that, although we did see several Brewer’s years ago while on a birding tour with Stu Tingley in eastern Arizona in early spring. But seeing them there in their normal habitat where they’re expected is different than seeing one here.

I was a bit shocked and wondered quietly to myself if maybe we might easily overlook one here someday. So when I saw Tracy Maas’s initial photo I studied it carefully and noticed two things—an apparent lack of warmth on the under parts and a dullness to the always-contrasting cold grey collar that a Clay-colored should show. Then I got curious and had to see this bird. Once I did, other features began to become more obvious. I tried to get photos from various angles to capture different plumage aspects and I have a ton of them.

But I waffled on it until I saw the Birding article on the hind necks of Spizella sparrows (that Paul later circulated) and the hind neck of Brewer’s seemed to be a dead ringer for the bird at Tracy and Tony’s property. But still not 100% convinced, and not wanting to spread a false alarm, I asked a few folks for an opinion and Paul Mansz responded with the same sentiments that I had. He visited with Tracy and Tony Maas, got some great photos, and later found the other article on Spizella variation that he also circulated.

It took the better part of three days for Paul and me to become convinced of Brewer’s, which was agonizing in that we wanted to spread the word but wanted to have at least a couple of people with the same opinion. We reached that point earlier today and the word went out. In the meantime the bird remained content, tame and apparently devoted to the feeders so hopefully everyone will have the opportunity to study it.

Ultimately, it will be a vote by the NB Bird Records Committee that will determine if this species will be added to the NB Bird List. But I hope there will be plenty of study and discussion generally, both within and outside of NB before a vote is taken. But this is one of the best opportunities we could ever have to learn more about the Spizella complex, with a very cooperative subject and very cooperative and interested hosts. If I were to see this sparrow while birding somewhere away from a feeder I’d likely never get the close looks and simply pass it off as a Clay-colored. There’s still so much to learn! Best regards, Jim Wilson.

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Exceptionally rare to the French Isles in winter, five White-crowned Sparrows were on St. Pierre Island 8 Dec–7 Jan. A Golden-crowned Sparrow briefly lingered in the Town of Canso, Guysborough Co NS 21 Dec–29 Jan (Tom Kavanaugh, ph. Logan Moore, m. ob.). Not only was the Golden-crowned Sparrow exceptionally late, it also provided the fifth winter record for the province, and the only report of the species for the region. Accidental in winter to insular Newfoundland, a Harris’s Sparrow in Fortune, Burin Peninsula-Marystown 24 Jan–4 Feb (Brenda Bungay et al.) provided a second winter record of the species for that province. Two Swamp Sparrows were located in Hyde Park, Cornwall, Queens Co PE 30 Jan (ph. Roberta Palmer) an exceptionally late date. The discovery of a Green-tailed Towhee in the Tantramar Wetland Centre, Sackville, Westmorland Co NB 17 Dec–12 Jan (ph. John Klymko, Beth MacDonald, Gianco Emanuel Angelozzi, m. ob.) during a Christmas bird count was exceptional. This Green-tailed Towhee provided the province with only the second record. Casual to Prince Edward Island, a male Eastern Towhee was in Middleton, Prince Co 7 Feb (ph. Donna Martin). A Yellow-breasted Chat, casual to insular Newfoundland, lingered into the season along the Virginia River, St. John’s through 28 Dec (Alison Mews et al.). A Yellow-headed Blackbird, amongst a large flock of Red-winged Blackbirds in Cook’s Brook, Halifax Co 19 Feb (ph. Anne MacDonald) was a casual visitor to that province. Accidental to Nova Scotia, a Western Meadowlark discovered in the Grand Pré area, Kings Co 22–26 Jan (ph. Harold Forsyth, m. ob.) provided the seventh record and the second winter record for the province (fide Alix d’Entremont).

The sole regional report of an Orchard Oriole was that of an individual in Glace Bay, Cape Breton Co NS 19–31 Dec (ph. Kenneth MacIntosh et al.), providing the second winter record for the province (fide Alix d’Entremont). The Baltimore Oriole first reported along Snake Road, Kings Co PE last Nov was again reported 8 and 22 Jan (ph. Fiep de Bie, ph. Scott Sinclair). Baltimore Oriole is particularly uncommon to St. Pierre et Miquelon—only being observed 13 out of the last 22 years (fide Roger Etcheberry). This season, a Baltimore Oriole was present in the Village of St. Pierre, St. Pierre Island 2–10 Dec (Valérie Jackman, Laurent Malthieux). A female Red-winged Blackbird successfully over-wintered in the area of English Point, Forteau, Labrador-Happy Valley-Goose Bay (ph. Vernon Buckle, Marco LeBlanc), being only the second one to do so.

Ovenbird is casual to Nova Scotia in winter where the sole reports of the species emanated. Individuals were on the Halifax Peninsula, Halifax Co 1–30 Jan (Natalie Barkhouse-Bishop, Wayne Green et al.), at Herring Cove, Halifax Co 1 and 5 Feb (ph. Cathy MacKenzie), and in Louisburg, Cape Breton 15 Feb (ph. John and Olive Spawn), all exceptionally late dates. Unusual to insular Newfoundland in winter, seven Orange-crowned Warblers were reported this season. Casual to St. Pierre et Miquelon, two Orange-crowned Warblers were present: one at Cap á Dinan, St. Pierre Island 4 Jan and 1 Feb (ph. Laurent Jackman), and at Étang Boulot, St. Pierre Island 4 Jan (ph. Laurent Jackman), both incredibly late dates. A Palm Warbler (ssp. palmarum) was at Cape Spear, Avalon Peninsula 3 Dec (ph. Charles Fitzpatrick). Similarly, Nova Scotia reported five Palm Warblers (all ssp. palmarum). Casual in winter to Prince Edward Island a Pine Warbler was in Kensington, Prince Co 15–21 Jan (Paula Pickering).

A Yellow-throated Warbler, casual to insular Newfoundland in winter, was in St. John’s 28 Dec–9 Feb (ph. Ethel Dempsey, m. ob.). The Prairie Warbler found on Sable Island National Park, Halifax Co NS 3 Feb (ph. Greg Stroud) was an extraordinarily late vagrant. Casual to Newfoundland and Labrador, and unexpectedly late, a Townsend’s Warbler was in Manuel’s River Linear Park, Avalon Peninsula 30 Dec (Todd Hollett, Todd Boland, ph. John Alexander et al.). Also unexpected was the Townsend’s Warbler in the Town of Yarmouth, Yarmouth Co NS 1 Feb (ph. Ronnie d’Entremont). Accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador, a Hermit Warbler made a brief appearance in St. John’s 26–28 Dec (Todd Bowland, ph. Alison Mews, ph. Ethel Dempsey et al.) providing a fifth record to that province. Three Western Tanagers were in Nova Scotia this season where they are casual winter visitors. Individual Western Tanagers were in West Pubnico, Yarmouth Co 4 Dec (ph. Ronnie d’Entremont et al.), another at Antigonish, Antigonish Co 12 Dec (ph. Cynthia Henderson, Carroll MacDougall et al.), and the last was in Glace Bay, Cape Breton Co 22 Dec (Kenneth MacIntosh). Casual in Nova Scotia in winter, a Blue Grosbeak was at Miner’s Marsh, Kings Co 31 Dec (ph. Wayne Walker).

Report processed by Andrew Keaveney, 24 Jul 2023.

Photos–Atlantic: Winter 2022–2023

A Graylag Goose arrived in Harricott, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 3 Dec 2022 and lingered through 11 Dec 2022 providing many opportunities for observation and documentation. Here photographed 5 Dec 2022 this Graylag Goose provided Newfoundland and Labrador with its fourth overall record and was only the second individual to be present in winter. Photos © Charles Fitzpatrick.

A Graylag Goose arrived in Harricott, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 3 Dec 2022 and lingered through 11 Dec 2022 providing many opportunities for observation and documentation. Here photographed 5 Dec 2022 this Graylag Goose provided Newfoundland and Labrador with its fourth overall record and was only the second individual to be present in winter. Photos © Charles Fitzpatrick.

A Graylag Goose arrived in Harricott, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 3 Dec 2022 and lingered through 11 Dec 2022 providing many opportunities for observation and documentation. Here photographed 5 Dec 2022 this Graylag Goose provided Newfoundland and Labrador with its fourth overall record and was only the second individual to be present in winter. Photos © Charles Fitzpatrick.

A Graylag Goose arrived in Harricott, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 3 Dec 2022 and lingered through 11 Dec 2022 providing many opportunities for observation and documentation. Here photographed 5 Dec 2022 this Graylag Goose provided Newfoundland and Labrador with its fourth overall record and was only the second individual to be present in winter. Photos © Charles Fitzpatrick.

A Graylag Goose arrived in Harricott, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 3 Dec 2022 and lingered through 11 Dec 2022 providing many opportunities for observation and documentation. Here photographed 5 Dec 2022, this Graylag Goose provided Newfoundland and Labrador with its fourth overall record and was only the second individual to be present in winter. Photo © Bruce Mactavish.

Pink-footed Goose is casual to Nova Scotia, and this individual lingered at Mill Creek, Kings Co 8–15 Feb 2023. Here photographed 22 Feb 2023. Photos © Sarah Foote.

Pink-footed Goose is casual to Nova Scotia, and this individual lingered at Mill Creek, Kings Co 8–15 Feb 2023. Here photographed 22 Feb 2023. Photos © Sarah Foote.

Pink-footed Goose is casual to Nova Scotia, and this individual lingered at Mill Creek, Kings Co 8–15 Feb 2023. Here photographed 22 Feb 2023. Photos © Sarah Foote.

This Barnacle Goose at the Estuary at the Stephenville Crossing, Newfoundland and Labrador 1 Jan 2023 through 2 Feb 2023 was a casual visitor to that Province. Here photographed 1 Jan 2023. Photos © Denise McIsaac

This Barnacle Goose at the Estuary at the Stephenville Crossing, Newfoundland and Labrador 1 Jan 2023 through 2 Feb 2023 was a casual visitor to that Province. Here photographed 1 Jan 2023. Photos © Denise McIsaac

This Barnacle Goose at the Estuary at the Stephenville Crossing, Newfoundland and Labrador 1 Jan 2023 through 2 Feb 2023 was a casual visitor to that Province. Here photographed 1 Jan 2023. Photos © Denise McIsaac

This Barnacle Goose at the Estuary at the Stephenville Crossing, Newfoundland and Labrador 1 Jan 2023 through 2 Feb 2023 lingered long enough that numerous individuals had the opportunity to observe and photograph it. Here photographed 1 Jan 2023. Photo © Kathy Marche.

It lingered at the Étang Boulot, St. Pierre Island 4–29 Dec 2022. Here photographed 29 Dec 2022. Photo © Joël Detcheverry.

This Redhead lingered into the season through 12 Dec 2022 at Abbott’s Pond, Port-au-Port Peninsula, St. George’s-Stephenville, Newfoundland and Labrador. Here photographed 1 Dec 2022. Photos © Kathy Marche.

This Redhead lingered into the season through 12 Dec 2022 at Abbott’s Pond, Port-au-Port Peninsula, St. George’s-Stephenville, Newfoundland and Labrador. Here photographed 1 Dec 2022. Photos © Kathy Marche.

This Redhead lingered into the season through 12 Dec 2022 at Abbott’s Pond, Port-au-Port Peninsula, St. George’s-Stephenville, Newfoundland and Labrador. Here photographed 1 Dec 2022. Photos © Kathy Marche.

An exceptional find, this Tufted Duck photographed at the Grand Étang, St. Pierre Island, St. Pierre et Miquelon 9 Feb 2023 provided the French Isles with their fourth record of the species. Photo © Laurent Jackman.

This Tufted Duck, accidental to Prince Edward Island, was present in Rustico Bay, Oysterbed Bridge, Queens Co 27 Feb 2023 through the end of the season. Here photographed 27 Feb 2023, this Tufted Duck provided the province with its sixth record. Photos © Donna Martin.

This Tufted Duck, accidental to Prince Edward Island, was present in Rustico Bay, Oysterbed Bridge, Queens Co 27 Feb 2023 through the end of the season. Here photographed 27 Feb 2023, this Tufted Duck provided the province with its sixth record. Photos © Donna Martin.

This Tufted Duck, accidental to Prince Edward Island, was present in Rustico Bay, Oysterbed Bridge, Queens Co 27 Feb 2023 through the end of the season. Here photographed 27 Feb 2023, this Tufted Duck provided the province with its sixth record. Photos © Donna Martin.

Exceptional and unexpected in winter, these four Sandhill Cranes toured Nova Scotia from Halifax Co 14 Dec 2022, to the New Minas area, Kings Co the next day and then briefly lingered in the Upper Granville area, Kings Co 21–23 Feb 2023. Here photographed 22 Feb 2023. Photo © David McCorquodale.

This American Coot at l’Étang Boulot, St. Pierre Island was only the third to overwinter on St. Pierre et Miquelon. Here photographed 30 Dec 2022. Photo © Valérie Jackman.

This Common Ringed Plover at Sunday Point, Kelley’s Cove, Yarmouth Co, Nova Scotia 11-12 Jan 2023 provided that province with its third record and its first winter record of that species. Here photographed 12 Jan 2023. Photos © Jason Dain.

This Common Ringed Plover at Sunday Point, Kelley’s Cove, Yarmouth Co, Nova Scotia 11-12 Jan 2023 provided that province with its third record and its first winter record of that species. Here photographed 12 Jan 2023. Photos © Jason Dain.

This Common Ringed Plover at Sunday Point, Kelley’s Cove, Yarmouth Co, Nova Scotia 11-12 Jan 2023 provided that province with its third record and its first winter record of that species. Here photographed 12 Jan 2023. Photos © Jason Dain.

This Common Ringed Plover at Sunday Point, Kelley’s Cove, Yarmouth Co, Nova Scotia 11-12 Jan 2023 provided that province with its third record and its first winter record of that species. Here photographed 12 Jan 2023. Photos © Jason Dain.

Accidental to Nova Scotia, this Common Ringed Plover at Sunday Point, Kelley’s Cove Yarmouth Co 11-12 Jan 2023 provided that province with its third overall record and its first winter record of the species. Here photographed 12 Jan 2023. Photo © Mark Dennis.

Seven Sanderlings were along the shoreline west of Basin Head Provincial Park, Kings Co, Prince Edward Island at the exceptionally late date of 31 Dec 2022. At least six lingered through the season. Here photographed 31 Dec 2022 (14a) and 22 Feb 2023(14b, 14c). Photos © Hélène Blanchet.

Seven Sanderlings were along the shoreline west of Basin Head Provincial Park, Kings Co, Prince Edward Island at the exceptionally late date of 31 Dec 2022. At least six lingered through the season. Here photographed 31 Dec 2022 (14a) and 22 Feb 2023(14b, 14c). Photos © Hélène Blanchet.

Seven Sanderlings were along the shoreline west of Basin Head Provincial Park, Kings Co, Prince Edward Island at the exceptionally late date of 31 Dec 2022. At least six lingered through the season. Here photographed 31 Dec 2022 (14a) and 22 Feb 2023(14b, 14c). Photos © Hélène Blanchet.

An exceptional discovery, this Common Snipe at Portugal Cove South, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 13 Jan 2023 provided the province with its fourth record of the species. Here photographed on that date. Photos © Bruce Di Labio.

An exceptional discovery, this Common Snipe at Portugal Cove South, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 13 Jan 2023 provided the province with its fourth record of the species. Here photographed on that date. Photos © Bruce Di Labio.

An exceptional discovery, this Common Snipe at Portugal Cove South, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 13 Jan 2023 provided the province with its fourth record of the species. Here photographed on that date. Photos © Bruce Di Labio.

An exceptional discovery, this Common Snipe at Portugal Cove South, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 13 Jan 2023 provided the province with its fourth record of the species. Here photographed on that date. Photos © Bruce Di Labio.

An exceptional discovery, this Common Snipe at Portugal Cove South, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 13 Jan 2023 provided the province with its fourth record of the species. Here photographed on that date. Photos © Bruce Di Labio.

An exceptional discovery, this Common Snipe at Portugal Cove South, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 13 Jan 2023 provided the province with its fourth record of the species. Here photographed on that date. Photos © Bruce Di Labio.

An exceptional discovery, this Common Snipe at Portugal Cove South, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 13 Jan 2023 provided the province with its fourth record of the species. Here photographed on that date. Photos © Bruce Mactavish.

An exceptional discovery, this Common Snipe at Portugal Cove South, Avalon Peninsula, Newfoundland and Labrador 13 Jan 2023 provided the province with its fourth record of the species. Here photographed on that date. Photos © Bruce Mactavish.

Mark and Sandra Dennis discovered this immature Gray Heron at Argyle Head, Yarmouth Co, Nova Scotia 27 Jan 2023 and it lingered through the season providing the opportunity for many to observe, photograph and document the second record, and first winter record of the species to that province. Here photographed 17 Feb 2023. Photos © Mark Dennis.

Mark and Sandra Dennis discovered this immature Gray Heron at Argyle Head, Yarmouth Co, Nova Scotia 27 Jan 2023 and it lingered through the season providing the opportunity for many to observe, photograph and document the second record, and first winter record of the species to that province. Here photographed 17 Feb 2023. Photos © Mark Dennis.

Discovered unfortunately, in a barn deceased at Ebenezer, Queens Co Prince Edward Island 16 Feb 2023, this Barn Owl provided the province with its second record of the species. Here photographed on 16 Feb 2023. Photo © Vanessa Bonnyman.

Accidental in winter to St. Pierre et Miquelon, this Northern Saw-whet Owl was photographed on the Isthmus 2 Jan 2023 and provided the French Isles fourth record of the species. Photos © Patrick Hacala.

Accidental in winter to St. Pierre et Miquelon, this Northern Saw-whet Owl was photographed on the Isthmus 2 Jan 2023 and provided the French Isles fourth record of the species. Photos © Patrick Hacala.

One of four Red-bellied Woodpeckers reported on Prince Edward Island this winter, this individual lingered through the season in the Horne Cross Road area, Queens Co, Prince Edward Island. Here photographed 22 Jan 2023. Photos © Vanessa Bonnyman.

One of four Red-bellied Woodpeckers reported on Prince Edward Island this winter, this individual was in Summerside, Prince Co 25 Jan and lingered through the season. Here photographed 19 Jan 2023 (22a), and 25 Jan (22b). Photos © Donna Martin.

One of four Red-bellied Woodpeckers reported on Prince Edward Island this winter, this individual was in Summerside, Prince Co 25 Jan and lingered through the season. Here photographed 19 Jan 2023 (22a), and 25 Jan (22b). Photos © Donna Martin.

One of two White-breasted Nuthatches present in Hyde Park, Cornwall, Prince Edward Island 30 Jan 2023. White-breasted Nuthatch is casual to Prince Edward Island. Here photographed that same day. Photo © Roberta Palmer.

Accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador, this White-breasted Nuthatch was in Stephenville, St. George’s-Stephenville 6-19 Feb 2023. Here photographed 6 Feb 2023, this White-breasted Nuthatch provided the province with its fourth record overall, and its second winter record. Photos © Kathy Marche.

Accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador, this White-breasted Nuthatch was in Stephenville, St. George’s-Stephenville 6-19 Feb 2023. Here photographed 6 Feb 2023, this White-breasted Nuthatch provided the province with its fourth record overall, and its second winter record. Photos © Kathy Marche.

One of three house Wrens reported in Nova Scotia, this individual was at the Beaufort Drive Wetland, Halifax Co 2–3 Dec 2022. Here photographed 2 Dec 2022. Photos © Jim Carroll.

One of three house Wrens reported in Nova Scotia, this individual was at the Beaufort Drive Wetland, Halifax Co 2–3 Dec 2022. Here photographed 2 Dec 2022. Photos © Jim Carroll.

A casual vagrant to New Brunswick, this Mountain Bluebird was in Little Shemogue, Westmorland Co 11-12 Dec 2022. Here photographed 12 Dec 2022. Photos © Jim Carroll.

A casual vagrant to New Brunswick, this Mountain Bluebird was in Little Shemogue, Westmorland Co 11-12 Dec 2022. Here photographed 12 Dec 2022. Photos © Jim Carroll.

Accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador, this Eurasian Blackbird discovered in Cartwright, Labrador-Happy Valley-Goose Bay 20 Dec 2022 lingered through the season. Here photographed 27 Dec 2022, this Eurasian Blackbird provided that province with is second record of the species. Photos © Vernon Buckle.

Accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador, this Eurasian Blackbird discovered in Cartwright, Labrador-Happy Valley-Goose Bay 20 Dec 2022 lingered through the season. Here photographed 27 Dec 2022, this Eurasian Blackbird provided that province with is second record of the species. Photos © Vernon Buckle.

This Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch was an exceptional visitor to the yard of Lynette Barns of Green Bay, Lunenburg Co, Nova Scotia 11-25 Jan 2023. Here photographed 25 Jan 2023, this Gray-Crowned Rosy-Finch provided Nova Scotia, and the Atlantic Region with their first records. Photos © Ronnie d’Entremont.

This Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch was an exceptional visitor to the yard of Lynette Barns of Green Bay, Lunenburg Co, Nova Scotia 11-25 Jan 2023. Here photographed 25 Jan 2023, this Gray-Crowned Rosy-Finch provided Nova Scotia, and the Atlantic Region with their first records. Photos © Ronnie d’Entremont.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, doubts quickly arose after the first images of this sparrow were sent to Jim Wilson. After some discussion with Paul Mansz, opinion as to its identity changed to that of a possible Brewer’s Sparrow. Jim Wilson took these additional photographs to aid in the definitive identification of this sparrow. Subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second record for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Photograph 28a was taken 26 Jan 2023, the rest of the images were taken 27 Jan 2023. Photos © Jim Wilson.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, doubts quickly arose after the first images of this sparrow were sent to Jim Wilson. After some discussion with Paul Mansz, opinion as to its identity changed to that of a possible Brewer’s Sparrow. Jim Wilson took these additional photographs to aid in the definitive identification of this sparrow. Subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second record for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Photograph 28a was taken 26 Jan 2023, the rest of the images were taken 27 Jan 2023. Photos © Jim Wilson.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, doubts quickly arose after the first images of this sparrow were sent to Jim Wilson. After some discussion with Paul Mansz, opinion as to its identity changed to that of a possible Brewer’s Sparrow. Jim Wilson took these additional photographs to aid in the definitive identification of this sparrow. Subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second record for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Photograph 28a was taken 26 Jan 2023, the rest of the images were taken 27 Jan 2023. Photos © Jim Wilson.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, doubts quickly arose after the first images of this sparrow were sent to Jim Wilson. After some discussion with Paul Mansz, opinion as to its identity changed to that of a possible Brewer’s Sparrow. Jim Wilson took these additional photographs to aid in the definitive identification of this sparrow. Subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second record for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Photograph 28a was taken 26 Jan 2023, the rest of the images were taken 27 Jan 2023. Photos © Jim Wilson.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, doubts quickly arose after the first images of this sparrow were sent to Jim Wilson. After some discussion with Paul Mansz, opinion as to its identity changed to that of a possible Brewer’s Sparrow. Jim Wilson took these additional photographs to aid in the definitive identification of this sparrow. Subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second record for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Photograph 28a was taken 26 Jan 2023, the rest of the images were taken 27 Jan 2023. Photos © Jim Wilson.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, doubts quickly arose after the first images were reviewed. After some discussion between Paul Mansz and Jim Wilson, including outside consultation, opinion as to its identity changed to that of a possible Brewer’s Sparrow. Subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second record for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Here photographed 28 Jan 2023. Photos © Paul Mansz.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, doubts quickly arose after the first images were reviewed. After some discussion between Paul Mansz and Jim Wilson, including outside consultation, opinion as to its identity changed to that of a possible Brewer’s Sparrow. Subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second record for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Here photographed 28 Jan 2023. Photos © Paul Mansz.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, doubts quickly arose after the first images were reviewed. After some discussion between Paul Mansz and Jim Wilson, including outside consultation, opinion as to its identity changed to that of a possible Brewer’s Sparrow. Subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second record for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Here photographed 28 Jan 2023. Photos © Paul Mansz.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Here photographed 29 Jan 2023. Photos © Jim Carroll.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Here photographed 29 Jan 2023. Photos © Jim Carroll.

Initially thought to be a Clay-colored Sparrow, subsequent images and discussions led to the decision that this was indeed a Brewer’s Sparrow—a first for the province and the second for the Atlantic Region if accepted by the NB Records Committee. Here photographed 29 Jan 2023. Photos © Jim Carroll.

Exceptionally rare, and late, to the French Isles in winter, five White-crowned Sparrows were on St. Pierre Island 8 Dec 2022—7 Jan 2023. This individual was photographed at Petite Pointe Blanche 5 Jan 2023. Photo © Joël Detcheverry.

Exceptionally rare, and late, to the French Isles in winter, five White-crowned Sparrows were on St. Pierre Island 8 Dec 2022—7 Jan 2023. This individual photographed was at Pointe Blanche 7 Jan 2023. Photo © Valérie Jackman.

Harris’s Sparrow is accidental in winter to Newfoundland and Labrador. This individual was in Fortune, Burin Peninsula-Marystown 24 Jan 2023—4 Feb 2023 and provided the province with its second winter record. Photo © Bruce Mactavish.

The presence of two Swamp Sparrows on Prince Edward Island in Jan is exceptional. This Swamp Sparrow along with the other were discovered in Hyde Park, Cornwall, Queens Co 30 Jan 2023. Their presence at this late date provided the first two winter records for the province. Photo © Roberta Palmer.

First discovered during the Sackville Christmas Bird Count, New Brunswick by John Klymko, Beth MacDonald, and Gianco Emanuel Angelozzi, word quickly spread of the presence of this exceptional rarity. This Green-tailed Towhee lingered in the area 17 Dec—12 Jan 2023 and provided the second record of this species to that province. Photo © John Klymko.

First discovered during the Sackville Christmas Bird Count, New Brunswick by John Klymko, Beth MacDonald, and Gianco Emanuel Angelozzi, word quickly spread of the presence of this rarity. This Green-tailed Towhee lingered in the area 17 Dec—12 Jan 2023 and provided the second record of this species to that province. Here photographed 18 Dec 2022 Photos © Rhonda Langelaan.

First discovered during the Sackville Christmas Bird Count, New Brunswick by John Klymko, Beth MacDonald, and Gianco Emanuel Angelozzi, word quickly spread of the presence of this rarity. This Green-tailed Towhee lingered in the area 17 Dec—12 Jan 2023 and provided the second record of this species to that province. Here photographed 18 Dec 2022 Photos © Rhonda Langelaan.

First discovered during the Sackville Christmas Bird Count, New Brunswick by John Klymko, Beth MacDonald, and Gianco Emanuel Angelozzi, word quickly spread of the presence of this rarity. This Green-tailed Towhee lingered in the area 17 Dec—12 Jan 2023 and provided the second record of this species to that province. Here photographed 18 Dec 2022 Photos © Rhonda Langelaan.

First discovered during the Sackville Christmas Bird Count, New Brunswick by John Klymko, Beth MacDonald, and Gianco Emanuel Angelozzi, word quickly spread of the presence of this rarity. This Green-tailed Towhee lingered in the area 17 Dec—12 Jan 2023 and provided the second record of this species to that province. Here photographed 18 Dec 2022. Photos © Jim Carroll.

First discovered during the Sackville Christmas Bird Count, New Brunswick by John Klymko, Beth MacDonald, and Gianco Emanuel Angelozzi, word quickly spread of the presence of this rarity. This Green-tailed Towhee lingered in the area 17 Dec—12 Jan 2023 and provided the second record of this species to that province. Here photographed 18 Dec 2022. Photos © Jim Carroll.

Eastern Towhee is casual to Prince Edward Island in winter. Photographed here on 7 Feb 2023 it was present in Middleton, Prince Co. Photos © Donna Martin.

Eastern Towhee is casual to Prince Edward Island in winter. Photographed here on 7 Feb 2023 it was present in Middleton, Prince Co. Photos © Donna Martin.

This female Red-winged Blackbird that successfully over wintered in the northerly community of English Point, Forteau, Labrador-Happy Valley-Goose Bay was only the second to do so. Here photographed 9 Dec 2022. Photo © Vernon Buckle.

Seven Orange-crowned Warblers were present in Newfoundland and Labrador this season. Of those, two Orange-crowned warblers were at Petty Harbour, Avalon Peninsula 7 Dec 2022. This individual was photographed 7 Dec 2022. Photos © Charles Fitzpatrick.

Seven Orange-crowned Warblers were present in Newfoundland and Labrador this season. Of those, two Orange-crowned warblers were at Petty Harbour, Avalon Peninsula 7 Dec 2022. This individual was photographed 7 Dec 2022. Photos © Charles Fitzpatrick.

Seven Orange-crowned Warblers were present in Newfoundland and Labrador this season. This individual was photographed in St. John’s 11 Dec 2022. Photo © Clarissa McIsaac.

Seven Orange-crowned Warblers were present in Newfoundland and Labrador this season. Of those, two Orange-crowned warblers were at Petty Harbour, Avalon Peninsula 7 Dec 2022. This individual was photographed 7 Dec 2022. Photos © Charles Fitzpatrick.

Casual to the French Isles, this Orange-crowned Warbler was photographed at Cap á Dinan, St. Pierre Island 4 Jan 2023. Photos © Laurent Jackman.

Casual to the French Isles, this Orange-crowned Warbler was photographed at Cap á Dinan, St. Pierre Island 4 Jan 2023. Photos © Laurent Jackman.

Casual to Newfoundland and Labrador, and unexpectedly late, this Townsend’s Warbler was in Manuel’s River Linear Park, Avalon Peninsula 30 Dec 2022. Here photographed on that day. Photo © Clarissa McIsaac.

Unexpected and a good find for Nova Scotia, this Townsend’s Warbler was photographed in the Town of Yarmouth, Yarmouth Co 1 Feb 2023. Photos © Ronnie d’Entremont.

Unexpected and a good find for Nova Scotia, this Townsend’s Warbler was photographed in the Town of Yarmouth, Yarmouth Co 1 Feb 2023. Photos © Ronnie d’Entremont.

Unexpected and a good find for Nova Scotia, this Townsend’s Warbler was photographed in the Town of Yarmouth, Yarmouth Co 1 Feb 2023. Photos © Ronnie d’Entremont.

Hermit Warbler is accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador. This individual made a brief appearance along the Waterford River Walk in St. John’s 26 Dec 2022—1 Jan 2023 and provided that province with its fifth record of that species. Here photographed 28 Dec 2022. Photos © Charles Fitzpatrick.

Hermit Warbler is accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador. This individual made a brief appearance along the Waterford River Walk in St. John’s 26 Dec 2022—1 Jan 2023 and provided that province with its fifth record of that species. Here photographed 28 Dec 2022. Photos © Charles Fitzpatrick.

Hermit Warbler is accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador. This individual made a brief appearance along the Waterford River Walk in St. John’s 26 Dec 2022—1 Jan 2023 and provided that province with its fifth record of that species. Here photographed 28 Dec 2022. Photos © Charles Fitzpatrick.

Hermit Warbler is accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador. This individual made a brief appearance along the Waterford River Walk in St. John’s 26 Dec 2022—1 Jan 2023 and provided that province with its fifth record of that species. Here photographed by Clarissa McIsaac 1 Jan 2023. Photos © Clarissa McIsaac.

Hermit Warbler is accidental to Newfoundland and Labrador. This individual made a brief appearance along the Waterford River Walk in St. John’s 26 Dec 2022—1 Jan 2023 and provided that province with its fifth record of that species. Here photographed by Clarissa McIsaac 1 Jan 2023. Photos © Clarissa McIsaac.