Young Birder Blog Birding #19

Young Birder Blog Birding #19

Bald Eagles lined the nearby river flats, watching wigeon flocks swimming around the marshy areas. The roadside ponds and meadows were home to the abundant residents of the region that welcomed us as we passed
Compiled by John Shamgochian
The icy winds of night are gone, this is not their domain.
Sun, sweat, purring fans.
Hades churning Lethe,
Sun chair, sleep.
Dogs in the shade, lemonade, boredom.
July.

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Camp Colorado at Pawnee National Grasslands, Colorado in July 2013 (Photo by Jennie Duberstein)

Corey Husic on The Baypoll Blog reminds us that there is (for now) still snow on this crumbling little orb.

Bald Eagles lined the nearby river flats, watching wigeon flocks swimming around the marshy areas. The roadside ponds and meadows were home to the abundant residents of the region that welcomed us as we passed: Trumpeter Swans, Black-billed Magpies, small flocks of Pine Siskins, and Northwestern Crows.

Perhaps slightly too old to be classified as a young birder, Neil Gilbert (being twenty) writes on his blog Not Just Birds about his experiences birding with famed birding duo the Such brothers:

We began in the solemn douglas-firs, serenaded by saucy kinglets and their out-of-control whistles and warbles. As our elevation ticked upward, the trees shrunk until they tempted abduction as house plants. The kinglets gave way to White-crowned Sparrows as the dominant species. Finally, vascular plant life all but surrendered, leaving us exposed among rock and lichen, the domain of Pipits and Ptarmigan that we did not see.

Guest writing for Bird Canada, Charlotte Wasylik talks about ethics:

Last summer when I started exploring Facebook, I found that most provinces and states had dedicated birding groups. There wasn’t one for Alberta, so I decided to start one. For the most part, being a group administrator is pretty easy. But every once in a while, something comes up that requires more attention and especially a good deal of thought, especially in a fairly large and actively growing group (more than 500 members now).

To end this list on a high note below is Craig Reed’s description of a mega on his blog, Midland’s Birder.

Twitchers running past, legs whirring, swearing and sweating…

2013-07-30T14:16:15+00:00