Young Birder Blog Birding #17

Spring generally means that winter doldrums and gloominess are left behind. The birds are back and singing, the flowers are blooming, and the air is warm, which always means paradise in Central Texas!

Compiled by Alexandria Simpson

Spring generally means that winter doldrums and gloominess are left behind. The
birds are back and singing, the flowers are blooming, and the air is warm,
which always means paradise in Central Texas! Birds
with nests are everywhere:  a Killdeer
and her chick near one pond, a Bewick’s Wren in a tractor implement (not in use
this time of year, luckily!), and an Eastern Phoebe in an old abandoned
barn. I am jealous of my dad (who is not
a birder) stopping in Arizona on his way to Nevada, and seeing Gambel’s Quail
and Phainopeplas, among other species that would be lifers for me, but maybe
next time…

There were so many good blog posts this month I had a hard
time choosing a few to highlight!

Ever had that feeling that David Bell, blogging at Birding in Sault Ste. Marie, had while
birding Point Pelee
?

Anyway, to that crazy weird bird
that Brandon mentioned I saw….Basically I saw this bird flying south toward
the Tip at about 7pm and thought, "Oh cool, a Common Nighthawk." I
then got it in the bins and was like, WHAT …IS THAT?!?!!

The Prairie
Birder
 interviews
Mark Cullen
, a well-known Canadian gardner who is currently guest blogging
and raising money for Bird Studies Canada.

I’m happy to announce that I have
an interview today with Mr. Cullen, especially during what is a very busy time
of year for him, even without the birding! As you may know, he writes a regular
gardening column for The Toronto Star, appears weekly on CTV’s Canada AM, and
one of his most recent books is Canadian Garden Primer: An Organic Approach.

And if you like poetic waxing, John Shamgochian of John's Birding Blog, as always,
delivers it while describing a day
spent birding and two lifers
.

Golden sunflakes danced off the
roofs of cars scattered through the parking lot, although eye-catching it was
not eye-holding, the glimmer of a White-crowned Sparrows feathers were far too
riveting.

Although this bird was seen in April, Alex Burdo from Flight of the Scrub-Jay posted about it in
May and I know quite a bit about seeing a new
patch bird
, after a period of no new ones.

It’s not every day that I see a new
bird for my Fairfield list. After all, I’ve been religiously birding my
hometown of Fairfield for years now. There are few birds that I haven’t
seen here, and that list of birds I’m missing got even smaller following a
visit to the Birdcraft this past Thursday.

Joseph
Nichols of Aberdeenshire Young Birder, over in Scotland, seems to be having a great
time with vagrants and migrants
.

Aberdeenshire birding has been on a
bit of a hot streak of late. It has been of those springs that seems to be
producing consistent amounts of local scarce (the first in a few years
admittedly). This has mostly concerned passerines in the last couple of weeks,
owing to some tasty fronts and fairly regular north-easterly winds.

2013-05-28T14:04:00+00:00