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birdwatching

Winter Sparrows, Southeast Arizona, January 2023

January 26 - February 1, 2023
$2,785.00 – $3,185.00

This IFO tour to Southeast Arizona is a must if you want to know all about identification, vocalizations, ecology, natural history, and conservation of a host of resident and migratory sparrows.
Winter Sparrows, Southeast Arizona, January 20232022-11-03T10:36:49-04:00

Honduras, February 2023

February 21 - March 6, 2023

Honduras may still be a little known birding destination, but thanks to its privileged position at the heart of the Central American isthmus and its interesting geography, it has all the trumps to become the next big ecotourism destination: varied habitats, welcoming people, good infrastructure, and of course plenty of birds. Join us for an off-the-beaten-track birding tour to beautiful Honduras!
Honduras, February 20232022-10-20T17:58:22-04:00

Namibia April 2023

April 8-20, 2023
$5,450 - $6,050

Located in southwestern Africa, Namibia boasts a well-developed infrastructure, some of the best tourist facilities in Africa, and an impressive list of breathtaking natural wonders: the vast Etosha National Park teeming with abundant wildlife; the petrified dunes of Waterberg; and of course the Namib Desert stretching for over 2000 km along the magnificent Atlantic Coast. Namibia is an ideal destination for travelers seeking an unforgettable African experience in a uniquely beautiful untamed wilderness.
Namibia April 20232022-10-19T16:42:45-04:00

Colombia, September 2023

With over 1,900 bird species, Colombia is home to about 20% of the world's total! Join the ABA's Colombia birding tour to the most biodiverse country in the world and enjoy the bird extravaganza of the Central and Western Andes and the famous Chocó bioregion.

Colombia, September 20232022-11-02T12:06:13-04:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 26, The Fantasy Nuthatch

Why do you go to birding? Is it to “chase” a rarity? To find one on your own? Is it for exercise? For contemplation? Is it to spend time with friends? To get away from it all? For science? For conservation?

How to Know the Birds: No. 26, The Fantasy Nuthatch2020-02-10T14:26:37-05:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 20, Alien Fairies in the Big City

Before we proceed any further, let’s play a little game. Let’s pretend we don’t know where we are. We scan around for clues and we see: Rush hour traffic—check. Pedestrians—check. Palm trees—check. Tall buildings—check. So far, so good. We’re plausibly in any one of those five densely populated cities. Now take a look directly overhead:

How to Know the Birds: No. 20, Alien Fairies in the Big City2019-12-07T20:33:53-05:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 19, A Big (Little) White (Blue) Egret (Heron)

The bird stood on the railing just beyond the high-rise hotel where I was staying. Moments earlier, a speedwalker had stopped for a moment to marvel with me at the beautiful beast. “We get a lot of those around here,” he informed me, sensing correctly that I wasn’t a local.

How to Know the Birds: No. 19, A Big (Little) White (Blue) Egret (Heron)2019-12-07T20:34:35-05:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 13, Gannets—Take 2

Call me a late bloomer, but I can finally tell you that the experience of being in a gannet colony is overwhelming, a transcendence, an imponderable conjoining of sensory overload and perfect inner calm.

How to Know the Birds: No. 13, Gannets—Take 22019-12-07T21:23:27-05:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 10, Dvořák’s Vireo

A few years ago, I was, for whatever reason, studying the score of the scherzo of Dvořák’s quartet, and it struck me that the celebrated “tanager” passage, measures 21–24, is an absolutely terrible transcription of Piranga olivacea, the scarlet tanager. However, it provides an eerily close match to an utterly different-looking bird species...

How to Know the Birds: No. 10, Dvořák’s Vireo2019-12-18T12:31:27-05:00

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