• Welcome to the May 2021 issue of Birding! In Birding Online, ABA members can explore extended online content, including contributions from talented young birders, a glimpse into the work of fabric artist Lisa Hess, and an interview with the Phoebes, a women's birding group.

  • In 2020, the ABA restructured its membership program so that its members now have online access to North American Birds, in addition to Birding. This means that North American Birds is now accessible to a wider audience than ever!

  • The last episode of the month means This Month in Birding, with a panel of Orietta Estrada, Gabriel Foley, and Mikko Jimenez. We have some interesting topics to chat about this week including that mystery bird illness and a possible connection to cicadas, a historical perspective on bird names in a read more >>

  • An Oriental Turtle-Dove in British Columbia this week is only the 6th record for North America away from Alaska, and Mississippi and Michigan enjoy 1st records.

ABA Travel

When you travel with the ABA, you help build a better future for birds and birding. The ABA offers a carefully designed program of birding travel experiences that not only let experience and thrill of seeing great birds and traveling with friendly, interesting people, they give you the satisfaction of knowing that you are supporting local on-the-ground conservation efforts as well as the ABA’s ongoing work to inspire all people to enjoy and protect wild birds.
Below is a sample of what we’ve got going. Click here to view all of our tours >>

  • February 5-15, 2022
    $5,750.00 – $6,400.00

    Join us for what promises to be an extraordinary tour offering an incredible diversity of wildlife, superb scenery, wonderful lodges, and super-friendly tribal people!
  • June 2–6 and June 6–8, 2022
    Price: TBD

    ABA’s Adult Birding Camp, with longtime friends of ours in the New River Gorge region of West Virginia. The cabins are comfy, the food home cooked and the atmosphere is fun.
  • My maternal grandfather died well before I was born, so all I got is stories. But stories can be powerful. Like this one: the story that my grandfather’s life would have been vastly different had he grown up with a Peterson field guide.

  • I learned about Snake Bight after reading about it, like so many dangerous things, on the internet: it was a recommended spot for the mangrove cuckoo. Snake Bight can have spectacular views of hundreds and sometimes thousands of wading birds and shorebirds feeding on the mudflats.

  • When looking at an unknown shorebird – or, in this case, shorebirds, the first task should be determining to which ABA-Area shorebird family our mystery bird might be referable...

  • Every summer, birders anxiously await publication of the “Check-list Supplement” by the American Ornithological Society’s Committee on Classification and Nomenclature of North and Middle American Birds (a.k.a. the NACC). The supplement (available linked to here eventually) details revisions to the NACC’s Check-list. Here's a rundown of the more significant revisions.

  • Mountaineer Books, a Seattle-based book publisher specializing in outdoor and conservation titles, has recently produced a slew of exciting bird books, including Paul Bannick's Snowy Owl and Great Gray Owl, Kim Long's What Birds Eat, and Molly Hashimoto's Birds of the West.

  • National Audubon Society's Birds of North America and Trees of North America are surprising, impressive, scholarly, and worthy additions to any naturalist's library.

  • While this year has been a tough one for many of us, birders in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada are receiving a welcome surprise as we experience a banner year for irruptive boreal birds, including remarkable records and a “superflight” of finches.

  • In 2004, Mark Obmascik suddenly burst onto the birding scene with the release of his first book, The Big Year—and his fame escalated when Hollywood made it into a movie in 2011.

  • Mountaineer Books, a Seattle-based book publisher specializing in outdoor and conservation titles, has recently produced a slew of exciting bird books, including Paul Bannick's Snowy Owl and Great Gray Owl, Kim Long's What Birds Eat, and Molly Hashimoto's Birds of the West.

  • While this year has been a tough one for many of us, birders in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada are receiving a welcome surprise as we experience a banner year for irruptive boreal birds, including remarkable records and a “superflight” of finches.

  • In 2004, Mark Obmascik suddenly burst onto the birding scene with the release of his first book, The Big Year—and his fame escalated when Hollywood made it into a movie in 2011.