tfloyd

About Ted Floyd

Ted Floyd is the longtime Editor of Birding magazine, and he is broadly involved in other programs and initiatives with the ABA. Ted has written 200+ magazine articles and 5 books, including How to Know the Birds (National Geographic, 2019). He is a frequent speaker at birding festivals and has served on several nonprofit boards. Join Ted at The ABA Blog for his semimonthly spot, “How to Know the Birds,” celebrating common birds and the uncommonly interesting things they do.

So You’re Noticing Birds All of a Sudden . . .

Here’s the deal: We’re all sheltering in place, we’re all staying at home, and we’re all, frankly, looking for ways to take our minds off the COVID-19 crisis, if even for a short while. And birding, it turns out, is a superb activity if you can’t get out of the neighborhood, if you can’t even get out of the house.

So You’re Noticing Birds All of a Sudden . . .2020-04-04T16:09:27-04:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 30, There are Crossbills. But. And.

This is a type 2 red crossbill because it sounds like one, looks like one, and acts like one. But check this out: We didn’t know any of that stuff when I started birding close to 40 years ago. Bird populations are changing, and so is our knowledge of bird populations.

How to Know the Birds: No. 30, There are Crossbills. But. And.2020-04-05T17:31:44-04:00

What To Do When They Close School

Hey, everyone! My name is Hannah Floyd, and I am a ninth-grader in Colorado. Like many of you reading this, I am on an extended break due to the coronavirus. What does one do in a situation like this? Go outside and explore, of course!

What To Do When They Close School2020-03-20T13:53:06-04:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 29, Mind of the Magpie

I’ve encountered an awful lot of black-billed magpies in my life, and, truth be told, I rarely if ever encounter the “perfect” bird. That’s because magpies are far too busy being admirably, absorbingly, utterly fascinating. Spend an hour with a pair of magpies, as I did late last month, and you will come away from the experience amazed and humbled.

How to Know the Birds: No. 29, Mind of the Magpie2020-03-17T11:05:17-04:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 28, A Prairie Falcon for the Twenties

Birding together has always been about learning and discovery, and it always shall be. There is something wonderfully nerdy about birding, and I make no apologies for that. But birding in the decade ahead is destined to be embraced more fully as a force for good—good for our bodies, good for our minds, good for humanity.

How to Know the Birds: No. 28, A Prairie Falcon for the Twenties2020-02-28T09:44:29-05:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 27, El Cacique

You heard it here first: Before too long, places like San Blas will be on the birding circuit. And sightings of birds like El Cacique will in some sense be routine.

How to Know the Birds: No. 27, El Cacique2020-02-18T20:17:05-05:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 26, The Fantasy Nuthatch

Why do you go to birding? Is it to “chase” a rarity? To find one on your own? Is it for exercise? For contemplation? Is it to spend time with friends? To get away from it all? For science? For conservation?

How to Know the Birds: No. 26, The Fantasy Nuthatch2020-02-10T14:26:37-05:00

How to Know the Birds: No. 25, Butterbutt, We Hardly Knew Ye

One of the greatest things about being a birder (and, to be fair, a butterflyer or a botanizer or an astronomer) is that things like yellow-rumped warblers are even out there at all. A warbler of all things! In the dead of winter! In frigid Denver!

How to Know the Birds: No. 25, Butterbutt, We Hardly Knew Ye2020-02-17T11:40:34-05:00