birding news
young birders
join
renew
donate
birding news
young birders
join
renew
donate

About the Author: Greg Neise

35 X 25

By |July 13th, 2020|Current|

The Tale of an Epic Big Sit in a Tiny Back Yard

Stuck at home for the entire spring migration, Greg Neise documents the birds flying through, around, and over his 35-foot-by-25-foot brick patio. Even if you're confined to a small urban swelling during this time of COVID-19, there is still birding to be had.

Alabama and Mississippi: Spring 2019

By |March 1st, 2019|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Spring 2019: 1 Mar–31 May Lawrence Gardella [email protected] Recommended citation: Jackson, G. D. 2021. Spring 2019: Alabama & Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9WD> North American Birds. The season began with near average temperatures and significantly low rainfall, but rain returned, and temperatures rose to above average in April and well above average in May. A Bermuda High in its usual location in the west Atlantic and extending into the Gulf Coast deflected most birds taking off from the Yucatan away from Alabama and Mississippi to Louisiana and Texas, though some weather events broke through for a read more >>

February 2019 Photo Quiz

By |February 13th, 2019|Photo Quiz|

While bird heads hold a frequently large suite of characters that can assist with the ID process – bill color and shape, eye color, crown color and pattern, supercilium, eyeline, loral area, malar area, throat color and pattern to mention most – these features are only rarely required for the ID process.

January 2019 Photo Quiz

By |January 10th, 2019|Photo Quiz|

Yet another dark, flying bird to test our birding mettle. This bird’s longer bill should steer us away from the various raptorial orders, however. In fact, the combination of our quiz bird’s mostly black body plumage, an apparent white patch on the relatively short wing, the long tail, and extensive white on the head dramatically reduces the ABA-Area identification options.

December 2018 Photo Quiz

By |December 13th, 2018|Photo Quiz|

Hopefully, we all agree that this month’s quiz bird is a raptor; certainly, the strongly hooked beak provides a datum supporting that initial ID. Raptors cause birders all kinds of fits as far as identification, for a wide variety of reasons. Their relative rarity means that most birders see relatively few individuals of most species in any given year, stretching the learning curve out over time.

Texas: Winter 2018-2019

By |December 1st, 2018|Regional Reports, Texas|

1 December – 28 February Eric Carpenter [email protected] Recommended citation: Carpenter, E., et al. 2020. Winter 2018-2019: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Z0> North American Birds 73 (2). Contributors (subregional editors in boldface) T. Jay Adams (TJA), John Allendorf, Mary Anderson (MAn), Lisa Appelbaum, Marie Asscherick (MAs), Mike Austin (MAu), Don Baker (DBa), Melissa Baker (MBa), Sheryl Barker (SBa), James Barnes (JBa), Kathy Bearden (KBe), Bill Beasley (BBa), Bill Beaty (BiB), Judy Behrens (JBe), Michael Behrens (MBe), David Bell, David Benn (DBe), Susan Bergeson (SBe), John Berner (JoB), Brian Berry, Brandon Best (BrB), John Biddick (JBi), Stephanie read more >>

Québec: Winter 2018–2019

By |December 1st, 2018|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Winter 2018–2019: 1 Dec–28 Feb Samuel Denault [email protected] Pierre Bannon [email protected] Olivier Barden [email protected] Normand David [email protected] Recommended citation: Denault, S., P. Bannon, O. Barden, and N. David. 2021. Winter 2018–2019: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-a20> North American Birds. Winter 2018-2019 was severe, with frequent freeze and thaw cycles in the south and heavy snows in central and eastern regions. Overall, temperatures remained below average in the south but near normal in the northernmost regions. It was a very interesting year for winter finches but very few vagrants were reported. Very unusual was the large numbers read more >>

November 2018 Photo Quiz

By |November 9th, 2018|Photo Quiz|

Here’s an angle on a species that many of us seen frequently, but possibly not often like this. The features that grab my eye, include the white belly, the orange throat, and the white wing stripe. “What? White wing stripe? What is that?”

October 2018 Photo Quiz

By |October 10th, 2018|Photo Quiz|

While many of us would get lost in the rufous aspect to the primaries of this month’s quiz bird, perhaps also the white in the secondaries, the initial critical aspect of this bird’s identification lies in noting its feet.

September 2018 Photo Quiz

By |September 10th, 2018|Photo Quiz|

Ah, back to a flying bird; much better than those pesky facing-away sparrows. The short, wide, and fairly flat bill and longish, narrow wings do a pretty good at ruling virtually all ABA-Area bird families out, except for the Anatidae. I am certain that many of us do not particularly care for the viewing angle on this beastie.

August 2018 Photo Quiz

By |August 6th, 2018|Photo Quiz|

Brown upperparts, longish tail, and pink legs on a bird standing on the ground: we can probably start the ID ball rolling with New World sparrows (Passerellidae; until recently, they were housed in Emberizidae). Yes, we can rule out the Old World Passer species [family Passeridae (e.g., House Sparrow), which are not particularly closely related to New World sparrows].

Alabama and Mississippi: Fall 2018

By |August 1st, 2018|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Fall 2018: 1 Aug–30 Nov Greg D. Jackson [email protected] Recommended citation: Jackson, G. D. 2021. Fall 2018: Alabama & Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9VR> North American Birds. Migration was kind to the busy observers in the region this autumn. Regular migrants, passerines and non-passerines alike, showed well, with many daily maxima broken across the spectrum of species. Quite a few late departure dates fell to the binocular-wielding troops as well. And those rare pearls of discovery appeared like magic to the fortunate on several occasions in both states. August came with normal temperatures, mid-fall was unusually read more >>

Texas: Fall 2018

By |August 1st, 2018|Regional Reports, Texas|

1 August - 30 November Eric Carpenter | [email protected] Eric Carpenter (Central Texas), Bert Frenz (Central Oaks & Prairies), Anthony Hewetson (Northwest Texas – Panhandle and South Plains), Jim Paton (JiP) (Trans-Pecos), Ross Rasmussen (North Central Texas) Willie Sekula (South Texas), Ron Weeks (RWe) (Upper Texas Coast), David Wolf (DWo) (East Texas Pineywoods) Recommended citation: Carpenter, E., et al. 2020. Fall 2018: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8YS> North American Birds. Contributors T. Jay Adams (TJA), Rodney Allen (RAl), Trevis Allen (TrA), Ty Allen (TyA), John Allendorf (JAl), Dean Anderson, John Anderson (JAn), Susan Andres (SAn), Connie read more >>

Québec: Fall 2018

By |August 1st, 2018|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Fall 2018: 1 Aug–30 Nov Samuel Denault [email protected] Pierre Bannon [email protected] Normand David [email protected] Olivier Barden [email protected] Recommended citation: Denault, S., P. Bannon, N. David, and O. Barden. 2021. Fall 2018: Quebec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-a1N> North American Birds. Continuing the same weather pattern that prevailed since late June, August and September were both very hot months. This trend ended abruptly in late September, giving way to very cool temperatures in October and November. Snow covered the ground as early as mid-November in Montréal. The most remarkable rarities of the season were a Broad-billed Hummingbird and read more >>

Arkansas & Louisiana: Fall 2018

By |August 1st, 2018|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

The Spring 2017, Mar. 1–May 31 Greg Hanisek 175 Circuit Avenue Waterbury, Connecticut 06708 [email protected] Recommended citation: Hanisek, G. 2020. The spring 2017: New England. North American Birds 71(3). Seasonal highlights include Red Knot, Red Phalarope, Black-legged Kittiwake, Western Gull, and Western Tanager. Contributors (subregional editors in boldface): Dick Baxter, Bill Beall, James W. Beck, Devin Bosler (DeB), Justin Bosler (JuB), Doris Boyles (DorB), Dottie Boyles (DotB), Matthew L. Brady, Jacque Brown, Steven W. Cardiff, Cheryl Childers, Kelly Chitwood, Laurie Clemens, Paul E. Conover (Louisiana), Kay Craig (KaC), Sarah Demadura, Alyssa DeRubeis (ADR), Anant read more >>

June 2018 Photo Quiz

By |June 7th, 2018|Photo Quiz|

One aspect of identifying birds with which I see many struggle, is birds not in those ideal, field-guide postures. These non-profile views usually do not present most of the characters used most often to identify the species. However, this aspect of identifying birds may well be the single feature that best differentiates the highly experienced, highly skilled birders from the rest.

Texas: Summer 2018

By |June 1st, 2018|Regional Reports, Texas|

1 June - 31 July Eric Carpenter [email protected] Recommended citation: Carpenter, E., et al. 2020. Summer 2018: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8YO> North American Birds. Contributors (subregional editors in boldface) T. Jay Adams (TJA), Noah Arthur, Ruben Ayala, Angela Bailey, Chris Bailey (CBa), Cissy Beasley (CBe), Mikael Behrens (MBe), David Bell, John Berner (JBe), Brian Berry, Brandon Best (BBe), Stephanie Bilodeau, Gary Binderim (GBi), Gene Blacklock (GBl), Justin Bosler (JBo), Michael Braun (MiB), John Brush (JBr), MJ Brush (MJB), Tim Brush, Kelly Bryan, Winston Caillouet, Skip Cantrell (SkC), Steve Cardiff (StC), Eric Carpenter (Central Texas), Katherine read more >>

Québec: Summer 2018

By |June 1st, 2018|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Summer 2018 : 1 Jun–31 Jul Samuel Denault [email protected] Pierre Bannon [email protected] Olivier Barden [email protected] Normand David [email protected] Recommended citation: Denault, S., P. Bannon, O. Barden, N. David. 2021. Summer 2018: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-a1A> North American Birds. Prolonging the pattern already in place in April and May, June was cool and dry. But starting in late June, a scorching heat struck southern Québec for a period of seven days. The temperature continued above normal for the whole month of July except in the North, where it was cool and wet. The most impressive rarities reported read more >>

Alabama & Mississippi: Summer 2018

By |June 1st, 2018|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

The Summer 2018, Jun 1, 2018-Jul 31, 2018 John A. Trent 4819 Pleasant Hill Road Midway, AL 36053 [email protected] Recommended Citation: Trent, J.A. 2018. The Summer 2018: Alabama and Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8QR> North American Birds. Generally, the region’s weather this season was typical with no extremes or tropical systems. An exception, though, was Tuscaloosa which in July received 11.8 inches of rain, a record for the month.  This season, summering waterfowl were widespread and Mississippi had the most notable rarities.  No significant breeding range expansions were noted. However, several species were confirmed or observed read more >>

Hudson-Delaware: Summer 2018

By |June 1st, 2018|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

1 Jun–31 July Robert O. Paxton [email protected] Shaibal Mitra [email protected] Tom Reed [email protected] Frank Rohrbacher [email protected] Recommended citation: Paxton, Robert O., et al. 2020. Summer 2018: Hudson-Delaware. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9nM> North American Birds. Summer temperatures exceeded long-term averages, unsurprisingly, while rainfall varied with storms. Delaware had flooding while the Adirondacks endured drought. Standouts were White-faced Storm-Petrels, Bridled Tern, New York’s fourth Anhinga, Delaware’s third Red-necked Stint, and a historic Roseate Spoonbill incursion. Contributors (sub-regional compilers in boldface) Deborah Allen (Central Park, NYC), Jesse Amesbury, Jim Austin-Cole, Andrew Baksh, Chris Bennett (DNREC), Lucas Bobay, Michael Bochnik read more >>

May 2018 Photo Quiz

By |May 2nd, 2018|Photo Quiz|

Ugh! While those of us that excel at identifying birds by shape probably consider this quiz straightforward, even easy, the rest of us may struggle. However, I look at photo quizzes as learning opportunities, and this is one doozy of an opportunity. So, let’s buckle down and look at our quiz bird carefully.

Birding Online: April 2018

By |April 19th, 2018|Birding Magazine|

IOANA SERITAN Associate Editor, Birding magazine Welcome to Birding Online! From this page, all ABA members can access the extended online content from the April 2018 issue of Birding magazine. The complete issue, containing both print and online content, can be found at: aba.org/birding-magazine-april-2018 The April cover is a real stunner (I mean, it always is, but this one is truly special). Rafael Gálvez graces the cover with his painting “Tidal Flats at Snake Bight, Everglades,” a landscape packed with Black Skimmers, Great Egrets, American White Pelicans, and plenty more. You could probably turn even the cover into a fun identification challenge! To read more >>

ID Challenge #12

By |April 3rd, 2018|ID Challenge|

This month's quiz bird produced an interesting array of responses, but most were of some species of duck. The wide bill and webbed feet certainly support such an identification.

ABA Photo Quiz – April 2018

By |April 2nd, 2018|Photo Quiz|

Over the years, I’ve seen a lot of birders get exasperated, even give up, on a bird that plays hide-and-seek in vegetation. They seem to want to always get that “field-guide view.” As we all know, birds often provide only partial views of themselves – it is a survival trait. Rather than get upset and turn away, keep watching it. While one may never get a full, clear view of the bird, it may well show enough of the critical pieces to be able to confidently slap an ID on the bird.

ABA Photo Quiz – March 2018

By |March 2nd, 2018|Photo Quiz|

Another flying bird in the quiz photo. Surely Leukering can take better photos than that! I mean, it’s under-exposed due to the subject being backlit. That’s one that should have been deleted from the camera!

Southern Great Plains: Spring 2018

By |March 1st, 2018|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

March through May 2018 Joseph A. Grzybowski [email protected] W. Ross Silcock [email protected] Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J. A., and W. R. Silcock. 2021. Spring 2018: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Zz> North American Birds. The region’s mid-continental location makes for interesting annual comparisons, as each year is different even if playing some of the same themes. It is often in the emphasis, and the region can play from both sides of the continent in addition to its own plains themes. Several species, such as Ross’s Goose, have shown dramatic increases over the decades; others, like Sandhill read more >>

Texas: Spring 2018

By |March 1st, 2018|Regional Reports, Texas|

1 March - 31 May Eric Carpenter [email protected] Recommended citation: Carpenter, E., et al. 2020. Spring 2018: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Za> North American Birds. Contributors (subregional editors in boldface) Megan Ahlgren (MAh), Rodney Allen (RAl), John Allendorf, Connie Andrus, Marlin Andrus (MAn), Bettina Arrigoni (BeA), Bob Arrigoni (BoA), Mike Austin (MAu), Ruben Ayala (RAy), Helen Baines, Paul Baker, Andy Bankert, Eddie Bartley, Mark Bartosik (MBa), Judy Behrens (JBe), Mikael Behrens (MBe), Dan Belcher, David Bell (DBe), Chris Benesh (CBe), William Benton, Brandon Best, Gene Blacklock, Matt Boone (MBo), Justin Bosler (JBo), Donald Brightsmith (DoB), David read more >>

Idaho & Western Montana: Spring and Summer of 2018

By |March 1st, 2018|Idaho & Western Montana, Regional Reports|

Spring and Summer of 2018, Mar. 1 - July 31 David Trochlell [email protected] Recommended citation: Trochlell, D. Idaho & Western Montana: Spring and Summer 2018. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Uj> North American Birds. Contributors Bucky Ballou, John Battalio, Jeff Brough, Steve Butterworth, Kathleen Cameron, Jay Carlisle, Brian Carrigan, Darren Clark, Josh Covill (JCo), Roger Coucet, Jon Curd (JCu), Stoddard Davenport, Todd Deininger, Kas Dumroese, Kathy Ecklund, Paulette Epple, Sheri Foote, Fred Forssell, Tom Forwood, Jackie Girouard, Terry Gray, Andrew Guttenberg, Brandi Henry, Alec Hopping, Denise Hughes, Cheryl Huizinga, Mike Hunter, Mary Korkor, Carl Lundblad, Mike Ingram, Kathy read more >>

Québec: Spring 2018

By |March 1st, 2018|Quebec, Regional Reports|

Spring 2018 : 1 Mar–31 May Samuel Denault [email protected] Pierre Bannon [email protected] Olivier Barden [email protected] Normand David [email protected] Recommended citation: Denault, S., P. Bannon, O. Barden, and D. Normand. 2021. Spring 2018: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-a1l> North American Birds. Overall, spring 2018 was colder and drier than normal, notwithstanding that March was a mild month, averaging 3o  C to 4o C above normal and accompanied by light precipitation. April was 3o C below average slowing down the melting of the snow. May continued below average with little precipitation. As everyone knows now, a monumental fallout of read more >>

Alabama and Mississippi: Spring 2018

By |March 1st, 2018|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Spring 2018: 1 Mar–31 May Lawrence Gardella [email protected] Recommended citation: Jackson, G. D. 2021. Spring 2018: Alabama & Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Wm> North American Birds. The season began wet and warm in the southern part of the Region and cooler but still wet to the north. Temperatures dropped below average in April but were well above average in May. Rainfall was particularly high in the south. The expansion of Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks continued in the Region. In Alabama, Inca Doves, White-winged Doves, and Common Gallinules also continued to increase their ranges. Also continuing were the slew read more >>

Birding Online: February 2018

By |February 1st, 2018|Birding Magazine|

IOANA SERITAN Associate Editor, Birding magazine Welcome to Birding Online! From this page, all ABA members can access the extended online content from the February 2018 issue of Birding magazine. The complete issue, containing both print and online content, can be found at: aba.org/birding-magazine-february-2018 I’m sure all of you members have known for months, so this won’t surprise any of you, but still! The 2018 Bird of the Year is the Iiwi, one of Hawaii’s mesmerizing honeycreeper species. As always, you will find lots of Iiwi goodies in this issue: stickers, coloring pages, a word search, the gorgeous cover itself, and thoughts on read more >>

ABA Photo Quiz – Feb 2018

By |February 1st, 2018|Photo Quiz|

We don’t have lot of plumage pattern to hang an ID on in this drab bird. All that we can see of the body plumage is unrelieved grayish-brown, or brownish-gray. The lack of wing pattern also provides little in the way of clues: no wing bars, no ulnar bar, no distinct patch of pale coverts.

ID Challenge #11

By |January 26th, 2018|ID Challenge|

Waterbirds. They are among the first birds that we learn. Most are found in the open. Most are easy to identify. And most receive little attention after the first few years of birding.

ID Challenge #10

By |January 26th, 2018|ID Challenge|

When dealing with a relatively uneventful bird such as this, it's best to return to the basics and focus on size and shape/structure. In this case, it's hard to make out the size for certain, but we can make a reasonable assumption from the twig that this is a fairly small bird.

ID Challenge #9

By |January 26th, 2018|ID Challenge|

The challenging combination of dense vegetation and active birds can make bird identification tricky. In this case it's hard to make out a lot on this bird.

Test Bunny Single Post

By |January 10th, 2018|Atest|

Little did we know in late 2019 that all of birding—and indeed the entirety of the human experience—would be turned upside down by the ongoing COVID-19 emergency. While the Code of Birding Ethics remains gratifyingly relevant, in the broadest terms, to birding at the present time, the COVID-19 crisis nevertheless presents the birding community with novel ethical challenges. To this end, the ABA’s Recording Standards & Ethics Committee (RSEC) has created a clear and succinct roadmap for ethical birding in these extraordinary and unsettling times. Help us reach our goal of $100,000! Total so far:

ABA Photo Quiz – Jan 2018

By |January 9th, 2018|Photo Quiz|

Ah, everybody’s favorite, a brown duck. Fortunately, despite many birders’ seeming thoughts that there aren’t, there are numerous useful ID characters presented in this photo that enable a quick solution to the quiz.

ABA Bird of the Year 2018: Iiwi

By |January 5th, 2018|Bird of the Year|

Iiwi (Drepanis coccinea) Introduction by Nate Swick, ABA Blog editor Adult (left) and juvenile Iiwi, as depicted by our 2018 Bird of the Year artist H. Douglas Pratt With Hawaii’s inclusion in the ABA Area in 2016, the state’s extraordinary native birdlife was added to the ABA Checklist, a process that was finalized in 2017. Birders in the United States and Canada, and indeed those around the world who keep an ABA list, were suddenly introduced to Akekees and Apapanes and Akohekohes, a whole menagerie of exotic looking birds with even more exotic sounding names. The honeycreepers read more >>

Soft Spot

By |January 5th, 2018|identification|

“Soft parts” is the term given to the parts of a bird not covered by feathers, although some of these parts are not particularly “soft.”

ID Challenge #6

By |January 5th, 2018|ID Challenge|

The combination of size and shape is so important in bird identification, that when we see a bird at an odd angle at an unknown distance, it can often be very challenging to identify.

ID Challenge #5

By |January 5th, 2018|ID Challenge|

This bird has a relatively thin and small bill, a wash of yellow on heavily streaked underparts, and a short tail with prominent tail “spots”.

ID Challenge #2

By |January 5th, 2018|ID Challenge|

Although it doesn't offer your typical field guide pose, this photo certainly does provide a view that we often see while birding-a bird's rear end.

Québec: Winter 2017-2018

By |December 1st, 2017|Quebec, Regional Reports|

The Winter 2017-2018, December 1 – February 28 Pierre Bannon 1517 Leprohon Montréal, Québec H4E 1P1 [email protected] Olivier Barden 2942 rue de l’Aubier Québec, Québec G1M 3V1 [email protected] Normand David 333 rue Querbes, App. 4-Y Vaudreuil-Dorion, Québec J7V 1J9 [email protected] Samuel Denault 1991 rue Saint-Zotique Est Montréal, Québec H2G 1J2 [email protected] Recommended citation: Bannon, P., O. Barden, N. David, & S. Denault, 2020. The Winter 2017-2018: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8O2> North American Birds. The first half of the winter 2017-2018, especially the Christmas period, was very cold with temperatures three to four degree Celsius below read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Winter 2017-2018

By |December 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

1 Dec 2017—28 Feb 2018 Joseph A. Grzybowski, Oklahoma [email protected] W. Ross Silcock, Nebraska [email protected] Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J. A. and Silcock, W. R. 2020. Winter 2017-2018: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9dj> North American Birds. In respect to birds and weather, this season was reminiscent of winters past: temperatures were cooler than in recent years; fewer southern species were found lingering; northern birds that have retracted north in recent decades—like Common Merganser and American Tree Sparrow—made slight southern reappearances. There were also Red Crossbills region-wide, western corvids appearing east to the plains, and, even read more >>

Texas: Winter 2017-2018

By |December 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, Texas|

1 December - 28 February Eric Carpenter [email protected] Recommended citation: Carpenter, E., et al. 2020. Winter 2017-2018: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8YJ> North American Birds. Contributors (subregional editors in boldface)    Megan Ahlgren (MAh), Jan Allen (JAl), John Allendorf (JoA), Joe Anderson, John Anderson (JAn), Kitty Anding, Susan Andres, Connie Andrus, Marlin Andrus (MAn), Jane Azzaro (JAz), Carol Bailey (CaB), Rebecca Bailey (RBa), Helen Baines, Monica Barerra (MBa), James Barnes (JaB), Glenda Barrera, Trey Barron (TBa), Jessie Barry (JeB), Chuck Baskin (ChB), Dianne Baughman (DBa), Bill Beaty (BiB), Mikael Behrens (MBe), Kevin Bennett (KBe), Chris Bergmann read more >>

Colorado: Winter 2017-18 

By |December 1st, 2017|Colorado & Wyoming, Regional Reports|

1 Dec–28 Feb Dean Shoup [email protected] Recommended citation: Shoup, D. 2020. Winter 2017-18: Colorado.  <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9vW> North American Birds. Temperatures for the season were much above average for the west slope and above average for the eastern half. Precipitation was much below average for the southeastern quadrant, below average for the west slope and near average for the northeastern quadrant. Mild temperatures may have factored in some passerine species lingering longer than usual. A first state record Red-breasted Sapsucker was a highlight, along with a few lingering warblers. Contributing observers (subregional editors in boldface): read more >>

Hudson-Delaware: Winter 2017–2018

By |December 1st, 2017|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

Winter 2017–2018, Dec. 1–Feb. 28 Frank Rohrbacher [email protected] Robert O. Paxton [email protected] Shaibal Mitra [email protected] Tom Reed [email protected] Recommended citation:  Rohrbacher, F., et al. Winter 2017–2018: Hudson-Delaware. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8UT> North American Birds. At the end of Nov. 2017 in the Hudson-Delaware region, the weather was seasonal.  Then, a large drop in temperature starting in n. and w. NY slowly moved south until it reached DE around Christmas. For the next three to four weeks, it was bitterly cold, with NY below zero by double digits, and DE in the single digits. Almost all the read more >>

Birding Online: December 2017

By |December 1st, 2017|Birding Magazine|

IOANA SERITAN Associate Editor, Birding magazine Welcome to Birding Online! From this page, all ABA members can access the extended online content from the December 2017 issue of Birding magazine. The complete issue, containing both print and online content, can be found at: aba.org/birding-magazine-december-2017 December’s cover is a reconstruction of the image on a pottery bowl, specifically UCM 03238, in the collection of the (c) University of Colorado Museum of Natural History. (Thank you, University of Colorado!) This image features one of the Hero Twins celebrated in the creation saga of the Mimbres people, from present-day New Mexico. Flocking to this Hero Twin are read more >>

British Columbia: Winter 2017–2018

By |December 1st, 2017|British Columbia, Regional Reports|

1 December 2017–28 February 2018 Chris Charlesworth [email protected] Recommended citation: Charlesworth, C. 2020. Winter 2017-2018: British Columbia. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9tj> North American Birds. A strong ridge of high pressure produced a warm and dry start to the Winter season over most of the Region. This changed suddenly the third week of December as the ridge retrogressed offshore allowing Arctic air to envelop all areas from the northeast. Overrunning Pacific moisture produced some rare, heavier, coastal snowfalls early in this cold air invasion. The cold pattern held sway through the first half of January, before the read more >>

Birding Online: October 2017

By |October 1st, 2017|Birding Magazine|

IOANA SERITAN Associate Editor, Birding magazine Welcome to Birding Online! From this page, all ABA members can access the extended online content from the October 2017 issue of Birding magazine. The complete issue, containing both print and online content, can be found at: aba.org/birding-magazine-october-2017/ October’s cover hints at the content within. This gorgeous watercolor of European Starlings by Kylee Wiseman is a nod to all of the amazing contributions from young birders in this issue. Halfway through the magazine, you’ll find yourself in the midst of a Forum that celebrates the talents of many teen birders, from articles written by Luke Maillefer, Diego Blanco, Madelyne Ray, read more >>

Atlantic Region: Fall 2017

By |September 1st, 2017|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

The Fall 2017, Aug. 1–Nov. 31 David Seeler 28 Irwin Drive Charlottetown, PE C1E 1S2 [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2017. The fall 2017: Atlantic Region & St. Pierre et Miquelon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8HF> North American Birds. Overall, fall temperatures were only slightly above average, save for Aug., which was the hottest on record. Excessive precipitation in the region was associated with the remnants of Tropical Storm Erin in late Aug., and with Tropical Storm Philippe in late Oct. Philippe, in particular, combined with other weather events along the East Coast to produce a major read more >>

Alabama & Mississippi: Fall 2017

By |August 1st, 2017|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Fall 2017: 1 Aug–30 Nov Greg D. Jackson [email protected] Recommended citation: Jackson, G. D. 2021. Fall 2017: Alabama & Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9VB> North American Birds. Fall 2017 was a time of storms and exciting avian discoveries, including three first regional records. Waterfowl were well represented this autumn, and large waders showed well in both states. Passerine migrant numbers seemed good in some inland areas, though relatively depressed on the coast; unusual flycatchers kept observers on their toes. Temperatures were normal early and warm late; precipitation levels were variable. Three tropical systems passed through our read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Fall 2017

By |August 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

1 Aug—30 Nov Joseph A. Grzybowski, Oklahoma [email protected] W. Ross Silcock, Nebraska [email protected] Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J. A. and Silcock, W. R. 2020. Fall 2017: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9cI>North American Birds. This fall season was exceptional in several respects. Species more common further west entered the region. In the Oklahoma Panhandle, birds that typically migrate during late August-early September were delayed into early October—potentially because of limited fronts and rainfall. Nashville Warblers were prevalent in late September, and Hurricane Irma seemed to nudge some eastern species west. Finally, species more western in this read more >>

Arkansas & Louisiana: Fall 2017

By |August 1st, 2017|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Fall 2017: 1 Aug–30 Nov Paul E. Conover, LA [email protected] Kenny Nichols, AR [email protected] Recommended citation: Conover, P.E., and K. Nichols, 2021. Fall 2017: Arkansas & Louisiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Yb> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include Red Knot, Red-necked Phalarope, Red Phalarope, Sabine’s Gull, Arctic Tern, and Crested Caracara. Abbreviations: GOM (Gulf of Mexico), Lake Dardanelle (Lake Dardanelle, Yell, AR), BKNWR (Bald Knob NWR, White, AR), YRARF (Yellow Rails and Rice Festival). Significance for Arkansas records is based on Arkansas Birds, their distribution and abundance (James and Neal 1986) and the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Fall 2017

By |August 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

August 1—November 30 Robert L. Norton (Greater Antilles, Bahamas) [email protected]; Andrew Dobson (Bermuda) [email protected]  Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) [email protected] Recommended citation: Norton, R., A. Dobson & A. Levesque. 2020. Fall 2017: West Indies. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9wt> North American Birds. The 2017 hurricane season had 17 named storms. Particularly devastating was hurricane Irma, (180 mph), the second longest duration in Category 5, which ripped through the northern Lesser Antilles obliterating Barbuda (6 Sep) before moving to the Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, Cuba, Turks and Caicos and the Bahamas.  All Barbudans were evacuated per government mandate, but read more >>

Texas: Fall 2017

By |August 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, Texas|

1 August - 30 November Eric Carpenter [email protected] Recommended citation: Carpenter, E., et al. 2020. Fall 2017: Texas. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8YF> North American Birds. The big story for the fall season was Hurricane Harvey, the first major hurricane to impact South Texas in a number of years. After decades with no major hurricane impacting the central coast, our collective luck ran out with this one. On the evening of 25 August, Harvey came ashore near Rockport as a Category 4 storm and slowly made its way towards San Antonio before reversing tracks and heading back read more >>

Birding Online: August 2017

By |August 1st, 2017|Birding Magazine|

IOANA SERITAN Associate Editor, Birding magazine Welcome to Birding Online! Here, all ABA members can access the extended online content from the August 2017 issue of Birding magazine. The complete issue, containing both print and online content, can be found at: aba.org/birding-magazine-august-2017 August’s cover gives us a sneak peak at one of the beautiful articles within: Frank Keim’s homage to Yup’ik names for and cultural connections to birds. You can read it for yourself on page 40 after perusing the constellation of names for Tom Johnson’s photo of a Willow Ptarmigan… Or should I say Aqezgiq? Cover image of Willow Ptarmigan by © Tom Johnson. As read more >>

Atlantic Region: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

The Summer 2017, June 1–July 31 David Seeler 28 Irwin Drive Charlottetown, PE C1E 1S2 [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2017. The summer 2017: Atlantic Region & St. Pierre et Miquelon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8NP> North American Birds. Temperatures were close to normal while parts of the region suffered a moderate drought this season. Significant observations included a flyby Bridled Tern on Machias Seal I., NB, and a Burrowing Owl in the Halifax region of NS. Contributors (sub-regional compilers in boldface) Roger Etcheberry, Alix d’Entremont, Bruce Mactavish, Jim Wilson. Abbreviations C. S. I. (Cape Sable I., read more >>

New Mexico: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|New Mexico, Regional Reports|

The Summer 2017, June 1 - July 31 Sartor O. Williams III 1819 Meadow View Drive NW Albuquerque, New Mexico 87104 [email protected] Recommended citation: Williams, S. 2020. The Summer 2017: New Mexico. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8No> North American Birds. The rains and late snows of the spring season were augmented by additional scattered rains over much of New Mexico in the summer of 2017, producing favorable habitat conditions in many areas and especially in the northeastern grasslands, where Cassin’s Sparrows, Grasshopper Sparrows, and Dickcissels were much in evidence. Birding was relatively quiet but still managed to produce read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

June 1 – July 31 Robert L. Norton (Greater Antilles, Bahamas) [email protected]; Andrew Dobson (Bermuda) [email protected]  Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) [email protected] Recommended citation: Norton, R., A. Dobson & A. Levesque. 2020. Summer 2017: West Indes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9wm> North American Birds. This season often has less excitement than other seasons in the region, except for Barbados. Its location in the western tropical Atlantic Ocean may attract species from three continents during this period of one-sixth of the year. Pacific Golden-Plover from either North America or eastern Siberia; Black Kite from Europe and Striated Heron from read more >>

Alabama and Mississippi: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Summer 2017: 1 Jun–31 Jul John A. Trent [email protected] Recommended citation: Trent, John A. 2021. Summer 2017: Alabama & Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9X4> North American Birds. This season was highlighted by Tropical Storm Cindy which made landfall June 22 in southwestern Louisiana. The outer bands brought onshore southerly winds onto the Mississippi and Alabama Gulf Coast for a three day period creating ideal birding conditions. Elsewhere in the region water level drawdowns at Eufaula N.W.R. in Alabama were the best they have been in many years, resulting in a nice assortment of wading and shorebirds read more >>

Western Great Lakes: Summer 2017 

By |June 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, Western Great Lakes|

1 Jun–31 Jul Peder H. Svingen [email protected] Recommended citation: Svingen, P. H. 2020. Summer 2017: Western Great Lakes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9wI> North American Birds. Temperatures were slightly warmer than normal and precipitation was above average in June for most of the region. Highlights included Buff-bellied Hummingbird and 2 Arctic Terns in Wisconsin, Wood Stork and Sharp-tailed Sandpiper in Michigan, and an amazing parade of rare waterbirds at the North Ottawa Impoundment in western Minnesota. North Ottawa was created as part of a flood diversion project for the Red River and has benefitted migrant shorebirds as read more >>

Tennessee & Kentucky: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, Tennessee & Kentucky|

1 June–31 July Chris A. Sloan [email protected] Recommended citation: Sloan, C. 2020. Summer 2017: Tennessee and Kentucky. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-98A> North American Birds. Temperatures were average to below average across the region in June, warming to slightly above average across Tennessee and western Kentucky in July. Rainfall was average to slightly above average across the region throughout the period. Rarity highlights in Kentucky included King Rail, Wood Stork, and Brown Pelican. In Tennessee, the headliners were the state’s (and region’s) first Broad-billed Hummingbird and the state’s third Arctic Tern. Other rarities included White-winged Dove, Wood read more >>

Québec: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|Quebec, Regional Reports|

The Summer 2017, June 1–August 31 Pierre Bannon 235 de Vimy, app. 2 Saint-Bruno de Montarville, Qc J3V 6G9 [email protected] Olivier Barden 2942 rue de l’Aubier Québec, Québec G1M 3V1 [email protected] Normand David 202-53 Hasting Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Québec H9G 3C4 [email protected] Samuel Denault 1991 rue Saint-Zotique Est Montréal, Québec H2G 1J2 [email protected] Recommended citation: Bannon, P., Barden, O., David, N., & Denault, S. 2020. The Spring 2017: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Ji> North American Birds. The summer of 2017 was very dry, with temperatures slightly above normal in eastern Québec. By contrast, western Québec, especially the Outaouais read more >>

Northern Canada & Greenland: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|Northern Canada & Greenland, Regional Reports|

1 Jun–31 Jul Cameron Eckert [email protected] Recommended citation: Eckert, C. 2020. Summer 2017: Northern Canada & Greenland. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9oe> North American Birds. The new Inuvik-Tuktoyaktuk Highway in northern Northwest Territories is scheduled to open in November 2017, but already, birders conducting assessments along the route are reporting interesting species. The road, which links the Dempster Highway to the Arctic Ocean, will undoubtedly become a very popular Northern Canada birding destination in the coming years. This season produced one new Yukon species, a surprise Calliope Hummingbird at Herschel Island-Qikiqtaruk off the Arctic coast. Contributors: David read more >>

Arkansas & Louisiana: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Summer 2017: 1 Jun–31 Jul Paul Conover (LA) [email protected] Kenny Nichols (AR) [email protected] Recommended citation: Conover, P., and Nichols, K. 2021. Summer 2017: Arkansas & Louisiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9UO> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include Broad-billed Hummingbird, Sooty Tern, and Sooty Shearwater. Significance for Arkansas records is based on Arkansas Birds, their distribution and abundance (James and Neal 1986) and the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) online bird record database (for records since 1986). The significance of Louisiana records is based on trends derived from the database of bird record cards submitted to and archived at the read more >>

Idaho & Western Montana: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|Idaho & Western Montana, Regional Reports|

1 Jun–31 Jul David Trochlell [email protected] Recommended citation: Trochlell, D. 2020. Summer 2017: Idaho & Western Montana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9rK> North American Birds. The summer of 2017 was unusually warm and dry in the region, but most bird species seemed to experience successful nesting seasons. These conditions have become typical in recent summers. The highlight from this span was, undoubtedly, the one-day-wonder Wood Sandpiper in Three Forks, Montana. Contributors: (subregional editors in boldface): Melody Asher, Robert Bond, Chris Bonsignore, Kathleen Cameron, Jay Carlisle, Darren Clark, Stoddard Davenport, Cory Davis, Matt Dunn, Kathy Ecklund, Tom Forwood, read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

1 Jun—31 Jul Joseph A. Grzybowski, Oklahoma [email protected] W. Ross Silcock, Nebraska [email protected] Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J. A. and Silcock, W. R. 2020. Summer 2017: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9e9> North American Birds. The mid-continental plains have a varied climate that, at times, exhibit extreme fluctuations. This season, the region demonstrated some recovery from a recent drought, and some wetland birds reentered the Plains—in particular Black-bellied Whistling-Ducks, rails, and Common Gallinules. Perhaps owing to more extensive habitat, several shorebird vagrants lingered on as well. Unique in this region is a series of hybrid zones read more >>

Hudson-Delaware: Summer 2017

By |June 1st, 2017|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

Summer 2017, June 1–July 31 Robert O. Paxton [email protected] Shaibal Mitra [email protected] Tom Reed [email protected] Frank Rohrbacher [email protected] Recommended citation:  Paxton, R. O., et al. Summer 2017: Hudson-Delaware. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8WL> North American Birds. After a rainy spring, summer 2017 remained wet, especially in July. Precipitation varied locally with storms, but Robert P. Yunick reported a 5-6” rain surplus for the season in the southern Adirondack foothills, while July rainfall in Atlantic City, NJ was 6” above normal. High water impeded breeding among Black Terns, Double-crested Cormorants, and beach nesters. Nestling Eastern Bluebirds and Tree read more >>

2017 Bird of the Year: Ruddy Turnstone

By |April 14th, 2017|Bird of the Year|

Ruddy Turnstone (Arenaria interpres) Introduction by Nate Swick, ABA Blog editor Ruddy Turnstones, as depicted by our 2017 Bird of the Year artist Sophie Webb. Travel to a beach just about anywhere in the world and you're likely to see Ruddy Turnstones. That's a great thing, because who would want to miss the striking shorebirds with the harlequin plumage and the dinky upturned bill? In a family of birds noted for their subtlety, Ruddy Turnstone is flashy. Among those known for their timidity, it is brazen. And while it is one of only a few species of birds read more >>

Birding Online: December 2016

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome to Birding Online! Here, all ABA members can access the extended online content from the December 2016 issue of Birding magazine. The complete issue, containing both print and online content, can be found at: aba.org/birding-magazine-december-2016 If you’re interested in reading recent issues, they’re all online at aba.org/birding-archive/. You will need to log in using your ABA member account, but after that, you can peruse all of the print and online content for issues going back to February 2014. Back to the December issue: ABA members are in for a great deal of expanded online content. Chatham Albatross. Snares Islands, read more >>

Birding Online: October 2016

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome to Birding Online! Here, all ABA members can access the extended online content from the October 2016 issue of Birding magazine. The complete issue, containing both print and online content, can be found online: aba.org/birding-magazine-october-2016 This issue is a great one, from front cover to the back. October Birding‘s front cover is by cartoonist Rosalind “Roz” Chast, of New Yorker fame. You’ve likely seen her work before – but this is the first time her art has ever graced the cover of Birding. If you’re interested in holding onto or sharing her artwork, you can buy copies of the October read more >>

Birding Online: August 2016

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome to Birding Online! Here, all ABA members can access the extended online content from the August 2016 issue of Birding magazine. The complete issue, containing both print and online content, can be found online: aba.org/birding-magazine-august-2016 The August cover shows the Endangered Species Act in action. The photo features Biologist Michael Keys installing an artificial nest cavity for Red-cockaded Woodpeckers, through the lens of Jim A. Stevenson. You can read more about the ESA, the Red-cockaded Woodpecker, and researchers at Tall Timbers Research Station, Florida, in the article on page 26. Michael Keys installing artificial nest cavities. Tall Timbers Research read more >>

Birding Online: June 2016

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome to Birding Online! Here is where all ABA members can access the extended online content from the June 2016 issue of Birding magazine. The complete issue, containing both print and online content, can be found online: aba.org/birding-magazine-june-2016 This issue’s cover features a stunning photo of a Double-Crested Cormorant by Mia McPherson. More of McPherson’s photography can be found on her website, On The Wing Photography. You can click here to see more of her photos of Double-crested Cormorants. Double-crested Cormorant. Fort De Soto Park, Pinellas County, Florida, March 2009. Photo by © Mia McPherson. Moving on to the read more >>

Birding Online: April 2016

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome to Birding Online! Here is where all ABA members can access the extended online content from the April 2016 issue of Birding magazine. The complete issue, containing both print and online content, can be found online: aba.org/birding-april-2016 This month heralds a number of migrations and changes present in both the bird community and the birding community. Inside, you will find migration patterns, our movement to the next generation of birding apps, a piece on the changing face of the multiple “Scrub Jay” species from young birder Dessi Sieburth, and more. News and Notes Online. The print issue contains Paul read more >>

Birding Online: February 2016

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome to Birding Online! Here you will find links to all the expanded online content for the February 2016 issue of Birding magazine. First things first: As an ABA member you have full access to the entire, expanded online version of this issue. Just click on this link: aba.org/birding-magazine-february-2016 Not only that, you have access to the entire, expanded online content of ALL recent issues of Birding: aba.org/birding-archive/ Click on any cover, and start reading. Just to be clear, this is ALL the content in ALL recent issues, PLUS all the expanded content. Now let’s look at some of read more >>

Birding Online: December 2015

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Happy New Year from Birding magazine and the ABA! If you’re an ABA member, you should have received the print version of Birding by now. Be sure to check out the expanded online version of the magazine, too. Visit our members-only portal and browse full content in the December issue and in every issue for the past few years. Everybody’s been talking about the Featured Photo in the print version of the December issue, and here’s what you’ve been waiting for: the full version of Peter Pyle’s good-naturedly notorious tutorial on identifying juvenile warblers. But wait!—would you rather first quiz read more >>

Birding Online: October 2015

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome to Birding Online, where ABA members go for complete access to all the content in the current issue and all recent issues of Birding magazine. There are two ways to enjoy Birding Online. One way is to read the magazine as an online flipbook, closely approximating the experience of reading an actual print magazine. The other way is to download content in PDF format (individual pages, whole articles, or the entire magazine), ideal for sharing and archiving articles and other content of special interest. Click here to get started. Selected highlights from Birding Online, October 2015 issue: ABA member milestones. Do you read more >>

Birding Online: August 2015

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome to Birding Online, where ABA members go for complete access to all the content in the current issue and all recent issues of Birding magazine. Click here to access the August 2015 issue online.  We start off the August 2015 issue with a farewell of sorts to the Budgerigar. If you were birding in the mid- to late 20th century, then you probably remember that the “Budgie” was one of the most numerous and most readily gotten of all exotic bird species in the ABA Area. No more. The species is gone as an established breeder. In a feature read more >>

Birding Online: June 2015

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome to Birding Online, where ABA members go for complete access to all the content in the current issue and all recent issues of Birding magazine. For the entire June 2015 issue, click here: aba.org/birding-magazine-june-2015 “Open” the magazine by pressing the right arrow, and “flip” through the pages just as you would a “real” magazine. And for access to all recent issues, click here: aba.org/birding-archive/ Browse the covers, choose an interesting one, open it up, and start reading. One of most beloved features in Birding is “Milestones,” where ABA members reminisce about recent listing and other birding achievements. Please read more >>

Birding Online: April 2015

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome to the expanded online edition of the April 2015 issue of Birding. To get straight to the April issue online, click on this link: aba.org/birding-archive/ Log in, and you’ll be taken to a page with covers from all the recent issues of Birding. Click on the April 2015 cover, with the Lazuli Bunting photographed by Marie Read. Open the magazine, and start reading! Flip through the magazine just as you would with the “normal” print version. Or, you can go to the Table of Contents, click on any title of interest, and jump straight to where you want read more >>

Birding Online: February 2015

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You have found your way to all the online content for the February 2015 issue of Birding. First things first. If you are a current ABA member, then you have access right now to the entire February issue online. Actually, you have access to more than the entire February issue! An expanded online version of the magazine contains additional analysis of the Featured Photo and the full text of all the book reviews. Green Herons in the Everglades. Composition from field sketches in mangrove habitat—watercolor on 140-lb. cold-pressed Arches paper. By © Rafael Galvez. Once you’ve read more >>

Birding Online: November 2014

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You’ve just found your way to all the online content for the November/December 2014 issue of Birding. We hope you enjoy your visit, and Editor Ted Floyd would love to get your feedback. This site is a launch pad to all the full-feature content in the November/December 2014 Birding. Think of it as your online Table of Contents. Click on the links below, and off you go! Let’s start off with a major news item. You’ve probably read about it already in Flight Calls, but just in case you missed it: All content—every single page—from the entire 2014 read more >>

Birding Online: September 2014

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You’ve just found your way to all the online content for the September/October 2014 issue of Birding. We hope you enjoy your visit, and Editor Ted Floyd would love to get your feedback. This site is a launch pad to all the full-feature content in the September/October 2014 Birding. Think of it as your online Table of Contents. Click on the links below, and off you go! Click here to access the entire online issue for September/October 2014: aba.org/birding-magazine-october-2014/ The cover of the September/October issue of Birding features the ABA’s new home in Delaware City, DE, and some of read more >>

Birding Online: July 2014

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Click here to access the entire online edition of the July/August 2014 issue of Birding: aba.org/birding-magazine-august-2014 What is the “agenda” for Birding magazine? Well, the magazine’s very name provides a strong clue. The magazine isn’t Birds or Bird Biology. Rather, it’s Birding, an affirmation of a human undertaking, a human perspective, a human agenda. Read more about “The Birding Agenda,” and join the conversation at The ABA Blog. Art by © Jen Brumfield. In “Birding Together,” ABA President Jeffrey A. Gordon invites birders to explore questions of identity and agenda as they relate to the Migratory Bird read more >>

Birding Online: May 2014

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You’ve just found your way to all the online content for the May/June 2014 issue of Birding. We hope you enjoy your visit, and Editor Ted Floyd would love to get your feedback. This site is a launch pad to all the full-feature content in the May/June 2014 Birding. Click here to access the online issue: aba.org/birding-magazine-august-2014 Think of this as your online Table of Contents. Click on the links below, and off you go! Our cover photo depicts a White-breasted Nuthatch. But which White-breasted Nuthatch? As Steven G. Mlodinow explains in a feature article in the current read more >>

Birding Online: March 2014

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You’ve just found your way to all the online content for the March/April 2014 issue of Birding. We hope you enjoy your visit, and Editor Ted Floyd would love to get your feedback. This site is a launch pad to all the full-feature content in the March/April 2014 Birding. Think of it as your online Table of Contents. Click on the links below, and off you go! Click here to access the March/April 2014 online issue: aba.org/birding-magazine-april-2014 The Sage Thrasher can be tricky to identify. So it helps to know the song! In a feature article in the read more >>

Birding Online: January 2014

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You’ve just found your way to all the online content for the January/February 2014 issue ofBirding. We hope you enjoy your visit, and Editor Ted Floyd would love to get your feedback. This site is a launch pad to all the full-feature content in the January/February 2014Birding. Think of it as your online Table of Contents. Click on the links below, and off you go! Click here to access the January/February 2014 online issue. It’s late winter, and eBird range maps are starting to light up with records of Rufous Hummingbirds migrating north along North America’s Pacific slope. read more >>

Birding Online: November 2013

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You’ve just found your way to all the online content for the November/December 2013 issue of Birding. We hope you enjoy your visit, and Editor Ted Floyd would love to get your feedback. Young birder Ibrahim Ayyash of Frankfort, Illinois, chuckles at the American White Pelicans decked out across pp. 52–53 in the November/December Birding. Ibrahim’s father, Amar Ayyash, is a gull nut who blogs at AnythingLarus.com, administers the Facebook Group North American Gulls, and writes about gulls for Birding (his next article appears in the January/February 2014 issue). This page is a launch pad to all the read more >>

Birding Online: September 2013

By |April 14th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You’ve just found your way to all the online content for the September/October 2013 issue of Birding. We hope you enjoy your visit, and Editor Ted Floyd would love to get your feedback. Now that she’s read the September/October 2013 Birding, Clara Kirk Pilger of Colorado Springs, Colorado, may quite possibly know more about Clapper Rail taxonomy than any other human being her age. (Clara’s aunt, LeAnn Pilger, is the ABA’s tireless and ever-helpful Membership Coordinator.) This site is a launch pad to all the full-feature online content in the September/October 2013Birding. Think of it as your online read more >>

Birding Online: July 2013

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You’ve just found your way to all the online content for the July/August 2013 issue of Birding. We hope you enjoy your visit, and Editor Ted Floyd would love to get your feedback.   Photo: Noah Swick of Greensboro, North Carolina, is fascinated by the feature article in the July/August 2013 issue on the rise of birding China. (Noah’s dad, Nate Swick, manages The ABA Blog and the ABA’s other social media initiatives.) This site is a launch pad to all the full-feature online content in the July/August 2013 Birding. Think of it as your online Table of read more >>

Birding Online: May 2013

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You’ve just found your way to all the online content for the May/June 2013 issue of Birding. We hope you enjoy your visit, and we’d love to get your feedback. Photo: Corinna Wren La Puma of Madison, Wisconsin, was eager to crack open this May/June Birding! She’s especially keen on the prospect of picking up Purple Swamphen in Florida the next time she visits her cousins. Corinna Wren’s dad, ornithologist and Leica representative David La Puma, will be an instructor with theABA’s Camp Colorado in July 2013. This site is a launch pad to all the full-feature online content read more >>

Birding Online: March 2013

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Welcome! You’ve found all the online content for the March/April 2013 issue of Birding. We hope you enjoy your visit. Photo: Young birder Mia Hartley shows us Bill Schmoker’s photo of a rosy-finch, appearing on p. 37 of the March/April Birding. The caption says it’s a Brown-capped Rosy-Finch, but it looks like a Gray-crowned Rosy-Finch. What’s up with that? Join the discussion online. This landing page is basically an electronic table of contents to all the online material in the March/April issue. Click on the links below, and off you go! About the Cover. No question about it: The Pribilof Islands, read more >>

Birding Online: January 2013

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Thanks for stopping by! We hope you enjoy all the online content in the January/February 2013 issue of Birding magazine. Photo: Young birder Andrew Floyd delights in our coverage in this issue of the status and distribution in the ABA Area of the Lesser Black-backed Gull. Here’s the lineup for the January/February 2013 issue: About the Cover. Artist Andrew Guttenberg reflects on his childhood experiences with the 2013 ABA Bird of the Year, the Common Nighthawk (Chordeiles minor). And we invite you to do the same. Check out Andrew’s essay, and then share with us your own experiences with and read more >>

2012 Birding Archives & Web Extras

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Vol. 44, No. 6 November 2012 Migratory Bird Joint Ventures: 25 Years of Conservation Partnerships. Jennie Duberstein, well known in the birding community for her tireless work over the years with the ABA’s successful young birder programs, also happens to be a major player in promoting bird conservation in the Americas. In this informative overview, Duberstein tells Birding magazine about the impressive and inspiring work of bird conservation partners in North America. In addition to all the print content in the November 2012 issue of Birding, we’re pleased to bring you substantial additional online content. Here’s a guide—think of it read more >>

2011 Birding Archives & Web Extras

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

WebExtra Feature—supporting material for Birding articles that can be found only on the ABA website. When you come across this logo in Birding, visit these archive pages to view the extended article. Vol. 43, No. 6 November 2011 Table of Contents [PDF: 342k] WebExtra About the Cover 22nd Report of the ABA Checklist Committee 2011 by Bill Pranty, et al. [PDF: 1.8M] The False Kirtland’s by Tony White [PDF: 1.4M] A Cautionary Tale (Bill) Size Matters by Sarah Toner and Alex Hale [PDF: 401k] » Play the Online Photo Quiz   Vol. 43, No. 5 September 2011 Table of Contents read more >>

2010 Birding Archives & Web Extras

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

WebExtra Feature—supporting material for Birding articles that can be found only on the ABA website. When you come across this logo in Birding, visit these archive pages to view the extended article. Vol. 42, No. 6 November 2010 Table of Contents [PDF: 154k] WebExtra About the Cover 21st Report of the ABA Checklist Committee 2009-2010 [PDF: 2.6M] by Bill Pranty, et al. The Many Savannah Sparrows by James D. Rising [PDF: 3.4M] WebExtra The Many Savannah Sparrows   Vol. 42, No. 5 September 2010 Table of Contents [PDF: 163k] WebExtra About the Cover Remembering Paul A. Shwartz (1917–1979) by read more >>

2009 Birding Archives & Web Extras

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Vol. 41, No. 6 November 2009 About the cover Table of Contents [PDF: 154k] A Birding Interview with Bill Pranty [PDF: 331k] People and Places [PDF: 141k] Sightings [PDF: 259k] Mid-September to Early October 2009 News and Notes by Paul Hess [PDF: 235k] “Lilian’s” Meadowlark ~ Birds’ Winter Distributions Icterids’ Colors and Songs ~ Aimophila and Pipilo Annual Report of the ABA Checklist Committee 2008-2009 [PDF: 1.6M] by Bill Pranty, et al. The Purpose of Field Guides: Taxonomy vs. Utility? [PDF: 577k] by Steve N. G. Howell, et al. WebExtra Snowcock Release: The Beginnings – Additional Content Photo Quiz read more >>

2008 Birding Archive & Web Extras

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

TED FLOYD Vol. 40, No. 6 Nov/Dec 2008 Table of Contents [PDF: 318k] A Birding Interview with Peter Pyle [PDF: 200k] WebExtra [PDF: 973k] A Birding Interview – Additional Content Sightings [PDF: 186k] Mid-September to Early October 2008 News and Notes by Paul Hess [PDF: 305k] Fea’s or Zino’s Petrel? ~ Tanager Taxonomy Red Crossbill Diversity ~ Phalarope Feeding Mechanics Annual Report of the ABA Checklist Committee [PDF: 1.1M] Birding in Iraq: A Photo Essay by Thomas Dove [PDF: 2.8M] WebExtra [PDF: 990k] Birding in Iraq – Additional Content Photo Quiz Answers by Cameron Cox [PDF: 251k] Spring at read more >>

2007 Birding Archives & Web Extras

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Vol. 39, No. 6 Nov/Dec 2007 About the cover Table of Contents [PDF: 194k] Editorial [PDF: 236k] A Birding Interview with David Wilcove Flight Path [PDF: 791k] Annual Report of the ABA Checklist Committee: 2007 Sightings [PDF: 114k] Mid-September to Early October 2007 News and Notes by Paul Hess [PDF: 292k] Christmas Counting in the High Arctic ~ “Winged Warbler” Hybridization Florida’s Endangered Grasshopper Sparrow ~ Nuthatches Understand Chickadees’ Language True Colors by Sheryl DeVore [PDF: 667k] Dancing Puffineers by Sara Lenoe [PDF: 579k] WebExtra Dimensions Special Issue [PDF: 56k]   Vol. 39, No. 5 Sep/Oct 2007 About the read more >>

2006 Birding Archives & Web Extras

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Vol. 38, No. 6 Nov/Dec 2006 About the cover Table of Contents [PDF: 189k] Editorial by Ted Floyd [PDF: 191k] The History of Birding Part VI. 2001-2006 Flight Path [PDF: 374k] Annual Report of the ABA Checklist Committee: 2006 News and Notes by Paul Hess [PDF: 362k] Seeing Subspecies in a Genetic Light ~ Blackcaps Reveal Evolution in Action Convergent Plumage in Two Woodpeckers ~ Marbled Murrelet in Dietary Trouble Contributions to our Knowledge of Molt in the Calliope Hummingbird by Donna L. Dittmann and Dennis K. Demcheck [PDF: 1.5M] Identification of “Black Petrels”, Genus Procellaria by Steve N. G. read more >>

2005 Birding Archive & Web Extras

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Vol. 37, No. 6 Nov/Dec 2005 Table of Contents [PDF: 139k] Editorial by Ted Floyd [PDF: 90k] The Bounds of Knowledge News and Notes by Paul Hess [PDF: 352k] Foxes and Birds: An Aleutian Saga ~ Piracy Profits Roseate Terns Another Wren for Troglodytes? ~ Weather Effects on Productivity Flight Path [PDF: 983k] Young Birder of the Year Contest: Field Notebook Module ABA Convention Report by Bill Maynard Tucson 18–24 July [PDF: 532k] Identifying McKay’s Bunting by Jason Rogers [PDF: 2M] Sources by Pete Dunne Common Ground [PDF: 186k]   Vol. 37, No. 5 Sep/Oct 2005 Table of Contents [PDF: read more >>

2004 Birding Archive & Web Extras

By |April 13th, 2017|Birding Magazine|

Vol. 36, No. 6 Dec 2004 Table of Contents [PDF: 168k] Editorial by Ted Floyd [PDF: 65k] A New Frontier Table of Contents [PDF: 168k] Editorial by Ted Floyd [PDF: 65k] A New Frontier News and Notes by Paul Hess [PDF: 220k] Brown Skuas in North Atlantic? ~ Kittlitz’s Murrelet: A New Puzzle Brown Pelican in Louisiana ~ American Redstart Winter Habitat Flight Path [PDF: 554k] The ABA: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow by Steve R. Runnels A Petrel Primer: The Gadflies of North Carolina by J. Brian Patteson and Edward S. Brinkley [PDF: 1.2M] Dimensions [PDF: 239k] Indelible Season read more >>

Québec: The Spring 2017

By |March 1st, 2017|Quebec, Regional Reports|

The Spring 2017, Mar. 1–May 31 Pierre Bannon 235 de Vimy, app. 2 Saint-Bruno de Montarville, Qc J3V 6G9 [email protected] Olivier Barden 2942 rue de l’Aubier Québec, Québec G1M 3V1 [email protected] Normand David 202-53 Hasting Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Québec H9G 3C4 [email protected] Samuel Denault 1991 rue Saint-Zotique Est Montréal, Québec H2G 1J2 [email protected] Recommended citation: Bannon, P., Barden, O., David, N., & Denault, S. 2020. The Spring 2017: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8J1> North American Birds. After the illusion of an early spring in late February, March came in like a lion bringing  cold temperatures and a very read more >>

New Mexico: Spring 2017

By |March 1st, 2017|New Mexico, Regional Reports|

The Spring 2017, March 1 -May 31 Sartor O. Williams III 1819 Meadow View Drive NW Albuquerque, New Mexico 87104 [email protected] Recommended citation: Williams, S. The Spring 2017: New Mexico. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Mu> North American Birds. Spring 2017 weather and habitat conditions were characterized by scattered rains and late snows in the north and west, leading to “lush” habitats there and in the southwest, but a drying trend continued in the southeast. Birds and birders were active, and a number of interesting rarities were documented, including Costa’s Hummingbird at several southwestern locales, and photo documentation read more >>

Idaho & Western Montana: Spring 2017

By |March 1st, 2017|Idaho & Western Montana, Regional Reports|

Spring 2017: 1 Mar–31 May David Trochlell [email protected] Recommended citation: Trochlell, D., 2021. Spring 2017: Idaho and Western Montana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Yp> North American Birds. The spring 2017 season in the region averaged warmer than usual and very moist, but ended on a drying trend in May. Abundant rainfall in March and April melted near-record mountain snowpack earlier than usual, causing accelerated runoff, unusually high stream and reservoir levels, and areas of lowland flooding. Season-long mild weather with a lack of dramatic storm events made for few noted bird fallouts; nevertheless, the region's birders found read more >>

Atlantic Region: Spring 2017

By |March 1st, 2017|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

The Spring 2017, Mar. 1–May 31 David Seeler 28 Irwin Drive Charlottetown, PE C1E 1S2 [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2017. The spring 2017: Atlantic Region & St. Pierre et Miquelon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Nz> North American Birds. The season began with multiple snowstorms and blizzard conditions blanketing much of the region, particularly NL, from mid-Mar. through early Apr. Spring flooding was a significant outcome of these storms in NB. As the season progressed, temperatures moderated to slightly below normal, and precipitation was above normal for most of the region. Stormy conditions in early Apr. in read more >>

West Indies & Bermuda: Spring 2017

By |March 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, West Indies & Bermuda|

March 1 – May 31 Robert L. Norton (Greater Antilles, Bahamas) [email protected]; Andrew Dobson (Bermuda) [email protected]  Anthony Levesque (Lesser Antilles) [email protected] Recommended citation: Norton, R., A. Dobson & A. Levesque. 2020. Spring 2017: West Indes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9wp> North American Birds. Bermuda highlights included the first May record of Iceland Gull.  Bicknell’s Thrush was more widespread among the Greater Antilles in its spring dispersal before heading north. Contributors (sub-regional compilers in bold): Peter Adhemar, James Barber, Linda Barry-Cooper, Susan Barton, Liz Leslie Brace, Elwood Bracey, Martha Cartwright, Sean Christensen, Dan Chronowic, DS CT (initials only) Judith read more >>

Western Great Lakes: Spring 2017

By |March 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, Western Great Lakes|

1 Mar—31 May Adam M. Byrne Recommended Citation: Byrne, A. M. 2020. Spring 2017: Western Great Lakes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9gi> North American Birds. Across the region, spring commenced with fairly normal temperatures, and March precipitation totals were above-average in Wisconsin, Michigan, and eastern Minnesota. April was slightly warmer than normal (resulting in many record early migrants), and very wet in both Wisconsin and Michigan. Average temperatures were slightly lower than normal in May and it was relatively dry throughout the region. The dead Northern Fulmar found on a Minnesota beach was a regional first. Other read more >>

Tennessee & Kentucky: Spring 2017

By |March 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, Tennessee & Kentucky|

1 Mar–31 May Chris A. Sloan [email protected] Recommended citation: Sloan, C. 2020. Spring 2017: Tennessee and Kentucky. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-98j> North American Birds. As an introductory note, we must recognize the contributions of Brainard Palmer-Ball, Jr. to this journal and to our overall knowledge of the avifauna of both Kentucky and the region. This is the first-ever Tennessee-Kentucky report without him as co-editor. When former North American Birds editor Ned Brinkley first called me about forming this new region in 2002, my first call was to Brainard to ask him to be the co-editor. It read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Spring 2017

By |March 1st, 2017|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

1 Mar—31 May 2017 Joseph A. Grzybowski, Oklahoma [email protected] W. Ross Silcock, Nebraska [email protected] Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J. A. and Silcock, W. R. 2020. Spring 2017: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9et> North American Birds This season, the region had numerous eastern species notably west, along with numerous western species notably east. Within this was the continuing pattern of eastern woodland species expanding northwest. As in recent years, spring arrivals were early, though perhaps less so than in some recent years. Certain species did depart the region very early this year, for example Snow Bunting read more >>

New England Region: Spring 2017

By |March 1st, 2017|New England, Regional Reports|

The Spring 2017, Mar. 1–May 31 Greg Hanisek 175 Circuit Avenue Waterbury, Connecticut 06708 [email protected] Recommended citation: Hanisek, G. 2020. The spring 2017: New England. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-89J> North American Birds. A somewhat colder than normal Mar. was punctuated by a 13–14 Mar. nor’easter that dumped more than two feet of snow on areas west of Boston. Apr. averaged warmer than the norm, and strong southwest winds 27–28 Apr. produced significant fallouts in the southern tier. In CT, 28–30 Apr. produced 20 first-of-year sightings ranging from Semipalmated Sandpipers and Common Nighthawks to two Prothonotary Warblers. read more >>

Québec: Winter 2016-2017

By |December 1st, 2016|Quebec, Regional Reports|

The Winter 2016-2017, December 1 - February 28 Pierre Bannon 235 de Vimy, app. 2 Saint-Bruno de Montarville, Qc J3V 6G9 [email protected] Olivier Barden 2942 rue de l’Aubier Québec, Québec G1M 3V1 [email protected] Normand David 202-53 Hasting Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Québec H9G 3C4 [email protected] Samuel Denault 1991 rue Saint-Zotique Est Montréal, Québec H2G 1J2 [email protected] Recommended citation: Bannon, P., Barden, O., Normand, D., & Denault, S. 2020. The Winter 2016-2017: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8IP> North American Birds. The winter 2016-2017 was among the three warmest winters in Québec's weather history. The average temperature at Val-d'Or finished second read more >>

Idaho & Western Montana: Winter 2016–2017

By |December 1st, 2016|Idaho & Western Montana, Regional Reports|

Winter 2016–2017: 1 Dec–28 Feb David Trochlell [email protected] Recommended citation:  Trochlell, D., 2021. Winter 2016–2017: Idaho and Western Montana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Yk> North American Birds. Despite predictions for a mild winter, unusually cold temperatures accompanied by above-average precipitation afflicted the region in December and January. February featured seasonally warm temperatures, but precipitation remained well above average. Perhaps owing mostly to the harshness of the season, relatively few vagrants were discovered. But if one supports the time-tested adage of “quality over quantity,” then the season will long be celebrated for the exciting discovery of an Old read more >>

New Mexico: Winter 2016-2017

By |December 1st, 2016|New Mexico, Regional Reports|

The Winter 2016-2017, December 1-February 28 Sartor O. Williams III 1819 Meadow View Drive NW Albuquerque, New Mexico 87104 [email protected] Recommended citation: Williams, S. 2020. The Winter 2016-2017: New Mexico. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8PK> North American Birds. Weather conditions during the winter 2016-2017 season were considered typical, with the relatively generous moisture conditions of the fall months continuing into the early winter across parts of the south, before giving way to drier and milder conditions, with scant mountain snow, by season’s end. A number of noteworthy bird records were obtained, including three Red-necked Grebes, Neotropic Cormorants read more >>

Hudson-Delaware: Winter 2016–2017

By |December 1st, 2016|Hudson-Delaware, Regional Reports|

Dec. 1–Feb. 28 Frank Rohrbacher [email protected] Robert O. Paxton [email protected] Shaibal Mitra [email protected] Tom Reed [email protected] Recommended citation:  Rohrbacher, F., et al. Winter 2016–2017: Hudson-Delaware. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Z4> North American Birds. December 2016 in the Hudson-Delaware region was warm and wet, with significantly more record highs than lows. The actual average temperature was 2 to 3 ℉ higher than normal throughout the region. Precipitation amounts were slightly above normal, and snow was only a minor problem, with the exception of lake-effect snow on the east side of L. Ontario and L. Erie. During Jan., a read more >>

Western Great Lakes: Winter 2016-17

By |December 1st, 2016|North American Birds, Western Great Lakes|

1 Dec—28 Feb Adam M. Byrne Recommended Citation: Byrne, A.M. 2020. Winter 2016-17: Western Great Lakes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9gc> North American Birds. December began cold and snowy, but was soon followed by above-average temperatures in January, which continued into February. Late February brought unseasonably warm temperatures that exceeded 60 F. However, southeastern Minnesota was quickly reminded of winter’s harsh ways: 22—24 February delivered more than a foot of new snow. By season’s end, Minnesota had experienced 10 consecutive months of above average temperatures. Michigan’s weather will be most memorable for the frequent warm spells—it was read more >>

Illinois & Indiana: Winter 2016–2017

By |December 1st, 2016|Illinois & Indiana, Regional Reports|

1 December–28 February James D. Hengeveld jhengev[email protected] Keith A. McMullen [email protected] Geoffrey A. Williamson [email protected] Recommended citation: Hengeveld, J. D., et al. 2020. Winter 2016–2017: Illinois and Indiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-991> North American Birds. Despite a slightly cooler-than-normal December, it was, again, a very warm winter, and the January-February period was the warmest on record (5.2 ∞C above average). As was the case in the previous winter, mild conditions produced high numbers of semi-hardy species reported in record numbers. In addition, many species stayed later than normal post-Fall, and others arrived early pre-Spring. Rarities included read more >>

Atlantic Region: Winter 2016–2017

By |December 1st, 2016|Atlantic Region, Regional Reports|

Winter 2016–2017, Dec.  1–Feb. 28 David Seeler [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. 2017. Winter 2016–2017: Atlantic Region & St. Pierre et Miquelon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8SU> North American Birds. Blizzard-like conditions bringing heavy snow began the winter season, and continued into the new year, with several significant snowstorms and one major ice storm. Despite this, overall precipitation rates for the region were at normal to slightly below normal for the season. Offshore coastal water temperatures for NB and NS were approximately 1–3 degrees Celsius above average. Temperatures for the region in general were slightly below normal read more >>

Tennessee & Kentucky: Winter 2016–2017

By |December 1st, 2016|Regional Reports, Tennessee & Kentucky|

1 December–28 February Chris A. Sloan [email protected] Brainard Palmer-Ball, Jr. [email protected] Recommended citation: Sloan, C. and Palmer-Bell, Jr., B. 2020. Winter 2016–2017: Tennessee and Kentucky. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-98L> North American Birds. Climatic conditions during winter 2016–2017 were overall mild, with variable precipitation during the season. The average temperature during December was very close to normal at all major recording stations for Kentucky and west Tennessee, and slightly above average for the rest of Tennessee.  However, January and February were much warmer than normal, with average temperatures roughly 7–8°F higher than normal and 9–10°F higher than read more >>

Colorado: Winter 2016–2017

By |December 1st, 2016|Colorado & Wyoming, Regional Reports|

Winter 2016-2017: December 1–February 28 Dean Shoup [email protected] Recommended citation: Shoup, D. 2021. Winter 2016–2017: Colorado. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-a0W> North American Birds. Temperatures for the season were above average to much above average throughout the state. Precipitation was near average on the eastern plains, above average in the southeast quadrant, and much above average throughout the rest of the state, except the West Slope experienced drier conditions in February. Overall, the season was a mild one, lending itself to some unusual sightings of birds typically found in warmer weather. Species such as Western Kingbird, Blue-gray read more >>

Arkansas & Louisiana: Winter 2016-17

By |December 1st, 2016|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

Winter 2016-17: 1 Dec–28 Feb Paul Conover (LA) [email protected] Kenny Nichols (AR) [email protected] Recommended citation: Conover, P., and Nichols, K. 2021. Winter 2016-17: Arkansas & Louisiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9UJ> North American Birds. Seasonal highlights include Black Scoter, Vermilion Flycatcher, Western Kingbird, and Chestnut-collared Longspur. Weather across the region was typical with the exception of an early January freeze that extended as far south as the Gulf for >24 hours. Significance for Arkansas records is based on Arkansas Birds, their distribution and abundance (James and Neal 1986) and the Arkansas Audubon Society (AAS) online bird record read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Winter 2016-17

By |December 1st, 2016|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

1 Dec 2016—28 Feb 2017 W. Ross Silcock, Nebraska [email protected] Joseph A. Grzybowski, Oklahoma [email protected] Recommended Citation: Silcock, W. R. and Grzybowski, J. A. 2020. Winter 2016-2017: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9dV> North American Birds. As in previous accounts, this season’s strong theme is the continued effects of climate change. Wintering ranges are shifting northward, and fall departure dates are protracted; increasingly, these occur during the winter period. This season, the array of species wintering northward included White-winged Dove, Greater Yellowlegs, Eastern Phoebe, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, and Grasshopper and Vesper Sparrows. Late arrivals of wintering read more >>

Québec: Fall 2016

By |September 1st, 2016|Quebec, Regional Reports|

The Fall 2016, 1 August – November 30 Pierre Bannon 235 de Vimy, app. 2 Saint-Bruno de Montarville, Qc J3V 6G9 [email protected] Olivier Barden 2942 rue de l’Aubier Québec, Québec G1M 3V1 [email protected] Normand David 202-53 Hasting Dollard-des-Ormeaux, Québec H9G 3C4 [email protected] Samuel Denault 1991 rue Saint-Zotique Est Montréal, Québec H2G 1J2 [email protected] Recommended citation: Bannon, P., Barden, O., Normand, D., & Denault, S. 2020. The Fall 2016: Québec. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Io> North American Birds. Above normal temperatures persisted for the entire period. August was the warmest in 70 years in southern Québec. Warm and read more >>

Atlantic Region: Fall 2016

By |September 1st, 2016|Atlantic Region, North American Birds|

The Fall 2016, Aug.  1–Nov. 30 David Seeler 28 Irwin Drive Charlottetown, PE C1E 1S2 [email protected] Alvan Buckley 17 Roche Street St. John's, NL  A1B 1L6 [email protected] Recommended citation: Seeler, D. and Buckley, A. 2016. The fall 2016: Atlantic Region & St. Pierre et Miquelon. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8GK> North American Birds. Although the effects of Hurricane Matthew on NS and Newfoundland lingered in early Oct., overall weather conditions were otherwise close to normal for the season. Unusual sightings within the region included Calliope Hummingbird, White-tailed Tropicbird, Black-capped Petrel, White-faced Storm-Petrel, Band-rumped Storm-Petrel, Hammond’s Flycatcher, and read more >>

New Mexico: Fall 2016

By |September 1st, 2016|New Mexico, Regional Reports|

The Fall 2016, Aug. 1 – Nov. 30 Sartor O. Williams III 1819 Meadow View Drive NW Albuquerque, New Mexico 87104 [email protected] Recommended citation: Williams, S. The Fall 2016: New Mexico. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Ky> North American Birds. Autumn 2016 was characterized by encouraging precipitation across the south and east, including from remnants of a hurricane in early September, and by generally warm temperatures into October and November. On the birding front, an impressive number of rarities were found, including New Mexico’s fifth Black Rail at Carlsbad. Contributors Michael J. Andersen, Jonathan P. Batkin, Matthew J. read more >>

Southern Great Plains: Fall 2016

By |August 1st, 2016|Regional Reports, Southern Great Plains|

1 Aug—30 Nov 2016 Joseph A. Grzybowski, Oklahoma| [email protected] W. Ross Silcock, Nebraska [email protected] Recommended citation: Grzybowski, J. A. and Silcock, W. R. 2020. Fall 2016: Southern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9d3> North American Birds The dynamic influence of changing climate on bird distribution and behavior is a key topic currently; these reports for North American Birds will be a documentary to some of those changes. In the Southern Great Plains, we noted this season an array of late fall departures, along with limited distribution of some northern species. Gulls and some waterfowl showed poorly—apparently, read more >>

Idaho & Western Montana: Fall 2016

By |August 1st, 2016|Idaho & Western Montana, Regional Reports|

Fall 2016: 1 Aug–30 Nov David Trochlell [email protected] Recommended citation:  Trochlell, D., 2021. Fall 2016: Idaho and Western Montana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Ye> North American Birds. The region's enigmatic fall 2016 weather began with typical mild conditions that persisted through September. But in October, unprecedented precipitation came to the region, making it the wettest October in recorded history. Mother Nature had still more surprises in store in November, when unusually dry and record-warm temperatures prevailed. By the end of the season, surface water remained unfrozen even at many high-elevation lakes, encouraging waterfowl and passerines alike to read more >>

Western Great Lakes: Fall 2016

By |August 1st, 2016|Regional Reports, Western Great Lakes|

1 Aug—30 Nov Peder H. Svingen [email protected] Recommended Citation: Svingen, P. H. 2020. Fall 2016: Western Great Lakes. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9jS> North American Birds. The relentless mantra, “temperatures were generally above average in the region,” was accompanied by the drumbeat of above average precipitation—though much of it fell in dramatic bursts. November was balmy, especially in Minnesota where the statewide temperature was 10 degrees above normal. Winter storm “Argos” 18—19 November dumped significant amounts of snow across the region, along with gale-force southwesterly winds. Some lingering migrants were probably trapped by this fast-moving system. Each read more >>

Alabama and Mississippi: Fall 2016

By |August 1st, 2016|Alabama and Mississippi, Regional Reports|

Fall 2016: 1 Aug–30 Nov Greg D. Jackson [email protected] Recommended citation: Jackson, G. D. 2021. Fall 2016: Alabama & Mississippi. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Xc> North American Birds. Drought was the byword of Autumn 2016 in our region, particularly in Alabama where the state climatologist labeled it the worst short-term drought in more than 100 years. A deficit in precipitation already was felt coming into the season, and all four months of the fall continued the trend. Higher than usual temperatures across the region made things worse. Though thankfully not enduring the destruction of tropical storms this read more >>

Iowa & Missouri: Fall 2016

By |August 1st, 2016|Iowa & Missouri, Regional Reports|

August 1–November 30 Joseph W. Eades Recommended citation: Eades, J. 2020. Fall 2016: Iowa & Missouri. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9wi> North American Birds. The fall season in the contiguous U.S. was the warmest on record for the second consecutive year.  August in Missouri was warm and very wet, with warmth and humidity continuing through September. October and November were unusually warm and dry, with temperatures averaging 5 and 7 degrees above average respectively. It was the warmest October in four decades and the eighth-warmest on record, while November was the fifth-warmest on record. The Sep-Oct-Nov period read more >>

Prairie Provinces: Fall 2016

By |August 1st, 2016|Prairie Provinces, Regional Reports|

Fall 2016: 1 Aug–30 Nov Rudolf F. Koes [email protected] Peter Taylor [email protected] Recommended citation: Koes, R. F., and P. Taylor. 2021. Fall 2016: Prairie Provinces. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9Va> North American Birds. August was rather wet throughout the region, especially in Alberta. Temperatures were near normal through much of the early fall, though central Alberta experienced a very cold October. November was mild throughout. The Rockies and parts of Saskatchewan were hit by massive snow storms in September and early October, respectively, but the snow did not persist. Southern Manitoba remained virtually snow-free to the end read more >>

Illinois & Indiana: Fall 2016

By |August 1st, 2016|Illinois & Indiana, Regional Reports|

Fall 2016,  Aug.  1–Nov. 30 James D. Hengeveld [email protected] Keith A. McMullen [email protected] Geoffrey A. Williamson [email protected] Recommended citation: Hengeveld, J. D., et al. 2020. Fall 2016: Illinois & Indiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-8Yo> North American Birds. The fall season was the warmest on record in the region, 2.6–2.8°C warmer than average, with normal precipitation, other than a very wet August. A below-average flight might have been the result of birds lingering to the north in warmer-than-average temperatures. Rarities for the period included Brant, Common Ringed Plover, Common Ground-Dove, White Ibis, Roseate Spoonbill, Swallow-tailed Kite, Gray Kingbird, read more >>

Colorado: Fall 2016

By |August 1st, 2016|Colorado & Wyoming, Regional Reports|

Colorado: Fall 2016 Fall 2016: August 1 - November 30 Dean Shoup [email protected] Recommended citation: Shoup, D. 2021. Fall 2016: Colorado. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9UY> North American Birds. Statewide temperatures from August to October were much above average, with the eastern half of the state experiencing record warm temperatures in November. August precipitation values ranged from above average in the west to near average in the Front Range and much below average in the northern and eastern parts of the state. September precipitation was near average in the west to below average for much of the read more >>

Alaska : Fall 2016 – Summer 2017

By |August 1st, 2016|Alaska, Regional Reports|

August 2016–July 2017 Thede Tobish [email protected] Recommended citation: Tobish, T. Fall 2016 – Summer 2017: Alaska. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9vM> North American Birds. This report summarizes observations in context of Regional significance or of unusual dates or locations for the twelve-month period from fall 2016 through summer 2017. Alaska’s overall temperature for 2017 followed a three-year trend of above long-term means. Northern Alaska again reported a high temperature deviation from normal with Utqiaġvik (Barrow) leading the way. The three last consecutive years have been Alaska’s warmest, most likely influenced by the strong El Nino, above average read more >>

Arkansas & Louisiana: Fall 2016

By |August 1st, 2016|Arkansas & Louisiana, Regional Reports|

1 Aug–30 Nov 2016 Paul Conover [email protected] Kenny Nichols [email protected] Recommended Citation: Conover, P. and Nichols, K. 2020. Fall 2016: Arkansas & Louisiana. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9sX> North American Birds. The weather for the region was generally typical for the season. No tropical weather systems  impacted the region during the period; however, a persistent low pressure system over south central Louisiana produced 20–30 inches of rain across inland south-central Louisiana over the 48-hour period of 12–13 August, and caused massive flooding in that area. Significance for Arkansas records is based on Arkansas Birds, their distribution and read more >>

Northern Great Plains: Spring 2016

By |March 1st, 2016|Northern Great Plains, Regional Reports|

1 Mar–31 May Ron Martin [email protected] Recommended citation: Martin, R. 2020. Spring 2016: Northern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9wc> North American Birds. Warm weather made an early appearance in the spring season with open water in early March in North Dakota. Good numbers of waterfowl were in South Dakota in late February and into North Dakota in early March. Some shorebirds and swallows also made early showings. Shorebirds of interest included a Ruff in North Dakota and Snowy Plovers in both Dakotas. A Black-legged Kittiwake was unusual for spring, and North Dakota had another Great read more >>

Northern Great Plains: Fall 2015

By |August 1st, 2015|Northern Great Plains, Regional Reports|

1 Aug–30 Nov Ron Martin [email protected] Recommended citation: Martin, R. 2020. Fall 2015: Northern Great Plains. <https://wp.me/p8iY2g-9wf> North American Birds. Temperatures were well above average in ND. The most extreme example was Grand Forks, ND, which experienced a full eight degrees above average in November. Water areas stayed open past mid-Nov, and waterfowl remained late in numbers. Northwestern ND had precipitation well above average, but southeastern ND was dry. A Long-tailed Jaeger was seen in ND, and the state had its second modern nesting of Trumpeter Swan. A Purple Sandpiper provided a first read more >>